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Just bought a 246 - looking for helpful tips

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    Just bought a 246 - looking for helpful tips

    finally pulled the trigger and bought a 246, cant wait to put her in the water and start cruising the Maine coast.
    anyone have any trailering tips.

    #2
    Welcome! Watch out for low clearances, make sure your spotter knows what he or she is doing, I used hip boots when we trailered and practice a bunch while the ramp isn’t busy until you have a routine. I could put our 1985 2450 on the trailer and be going up the ramp in 8-10 minutes then go back and watch others fuss and fiddle. Have a checklist where every other item on the launch list is “Is the plug in?” That can be item number two coming out of the water after looking to see you are on the trailer properly.
    P/C Pete
    Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
    1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
    Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
    MMSI 367770440

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    • maineguy
      maineguy commented
      Editing a comment
      We live in the belgrade lakes area and have been boating all our lives, the wife and girls look like a pit crew launching our 20ft Prince craft deck boat. Now that the kids are away at school its just the wife and i to explore the Maine coast.i agree with the checklist, its the way to go. My biggest concern is putting the 246 on the trailer, as it can get windy on the coast and its a wee bit bigger than the Princecraft.

    • Pcpete
      Pcpete commented
      Editing a comment
      That’s why I used hip boots, so I could get in the water and get the bow into the rollers. With your experience you’ve seen trailers that aren’t set quite right for the boat. Nevermind the rollers that don’t roll. Having the cradle loose enough to capture the bow like squeezing your cheeks, once the winch line is taught, the boat will straighten right out. If things are greased properly the boat will roll right on. However, trying to stay out of the water is a risky proposition. When I was a teen a bunch of us would work the local boat ramp during salmon season. Tee shirt, cut offs and ugly converses and a willingness to get as wet as required was all we needed. This was around 1961-2 and I’d go home with $20 for twelve hours of work in 50 degree water. I learned a lot about people, winds, tides and currents. I probably launched and retrieved 5-600 boats in a six week period, and it got so the fishermen would point and ask for a particular one of us. It got to the point where a few of us were being asked what was so good about that other guys trailer, and we’d explain it. Great life lessons.

    #3
    Unless you’ve trailered before, when you take the first few trips, go at high tide or on a rising tide. It’s a whole lot easier to get one up a shorter ramp that isn’t half slime when you load up. Also at a slack tide high or low is the best time because you won’t have to fight the tide flow when trying to load and center the boat.
    1990 2755 - sold
    2005 275 - sold (now boatless)

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      #4
      I live in Queens New York and I bought my 246 Bayliner up in Whitehall New York 4 and a half hours away.
      I hired a professional mover to bring it down to Queens as I followed. I'm so glad I did, on the Cross Bronx he hit an up bump and the hitch came off the ball and hit the back of his pick up truck
      . But this guy was all prepared he had a jack and blocks in the exit lane we got it back up on the ball and was on our way If that would've happened to me with a rented pick up truck I would've shit.
      Anyway I'll have no need for the trailer so I'll be looking to sell it in May--right now the boat sitting on it . They say I should get a decent buck for it --it's a 2010 and it's never been in salt water--- stay tuned

      Attached Files

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        #5
        Nice boat. I’d keep that trailer because one day you’re gonna need it, if the boat needs to be pulled because if a storm or needs to be trailered to a repair shop etc. Plus boats are easier to sell with a trailer under them...
        88 Four Winns 200 Horizon 4.3 OMC
        98 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4.0/Selectrac
        07 Jeep Grand Cherokee 5.7 Hemi/Quadradrive II

        Long Island Sound Region

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          #6
          Whatever you get for the trailer, you won't be able to replace it for that, WHEN you need or want it. You can pull that boat and trailer with any half-ton pickup or full size SUV or van. You'll hurt the value of the boat WHEN you go to sell it. Don't be "penny wise and pound foolish." I've been through this before, on my 17th boat in @ 50 years...
          Jeff & Tara
          (And Ginger too)
          Lake Havasu City, AZ

          2000 Bayliner 3388
          "GetAway"
          Cummins 4bta 250s

          In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. July 2, 2010

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            #7
            I couldn’t agree more find a place for that trailer and keep it.
            Be good, be happy, for tomorrow is promised to no man !

            1994 2452, 5.0l, Alpha gen. 2 drive. Sold ! Sold ! Sold !

            '86 / 19' Citation cuddy, Merc. 3.0L / 140 hp 86' , stringer drive. Sold ! Sold ! Sold !

            Manalapan N.J

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              #8
              Ok you just talked me in to keeping it --I'll look into how much there want to store it --this place doesn't have a trailer ramp they use a travel lift and they normally store boats on jackstands which they will have to do for me so I can paint the bottom --the boats never been used in salt water that's one of the main reasons I wanted it .

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