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Advice for a novice - please-gctid817107

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  • Dave_GT
    replied
    Thanks for your advice much appreciated. The learning curve will go up exponentially of that I'm certain and the first is navigating round the forum! A new thread will be started and an introduction about me (post haste)!

    Regards,

    Dave

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  • Pcpete
    replied
    Dave, first, welcome! Next, I suggest you start this as a new thread so more folks will see it as a standalone. Along the way, add some vital information about your soon to be yours boat, where you live and plan to use the boat.

    I'm immediately concerned about two things you didn't mention. First a condition and valuation survey that you pay for to have your inspector go over the boat in detail looking for hidden problems like soft wood core under the flying bridge or around the anchor windless. Your insurance company, and you should be looking, IMO, at a Yacht policy which will be for an agreed value based on the survey results will require the survey. Next, you should have a competent Hino mechanic look at the engines prior to starting them. Not a mechanic familiar with Hinos, someone who really knows them. The best advice you can get is from the "Baylinerguru" http://www.susanmohr.com/index.html All here will attest to his knowledge and agreeable nature. Another great source is "smitty477" here on the BOC. In any case, diesels start at an idle. Period. You don't pump the throttle or rev them up until they settle in at idle. It's very likely the fuel has grown some critters and you very well may want to either drain the tanks and system or have the fuel polished before going very far. At least carry a bunch of spare, tight micron filters. I like two micron to keep crap out of the injectors. There should also be a sea trial where everything is properly warmed up and tested.

    Look at this as more like buying a house rather than a car. Get a documentation search, it will also ensure there's no funny business going on like it's been sunk three times or is stolen or has a bunch of liens against it that are going to become your responsibility. Then document the boat with the Coast Guard. A Yacht escrow service can do most of this for you. I did my own legwork getting papers signed and notarized I was charged less than $500 including the documentation application. There's also a neat site where you can look at names you are thinking about that gives all of the documented boats of that name and their home port.

    Once the boat is yours, pm me and I'll share modifications I've made to ours that are making the Admiral very happy. One is revising the ladder to the flying bridge so it's more like a step ladder than a vertical climb.

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  • Dave_GT
    replied
    I'm also a new recruit and about to take ownership of a 3888 circa 1990 . She is in tip top condition cosmetically but the current owner hasn't run the engines for over 2 years. I would appreciate any advice on what needs to be done prior to trying to start her up? I have a background in engineering and have concerns of potential damage if the engines are run up straight off?

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    On my 185 I have on the trim switch up 2 position...coming from the down position if I push gently to raise the feet, it will stop at the max up angle for safe running...after that if I push harder on the up trim button it will rise up to the trailering position...fully up. The max running position is about 3/4 of the max up travel...so what I do is I lower my feet below 3/4 ...say 5/8...and then I raise it with the gentle touch till it stop at the max running position

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  • CraigM
    replied
    Like the others have said, ensure the intake is submerged. You can start and maneuver the boat into deeper water with the trim up if you have to, but keep the revs down (just above idle). And then lower your drive when you have about 3' of water.

    On my 175, I can have the drive trimmed all the way up and the intake is still submerged. I don't like starting the engine like this but shallow water sometimes dictates this...otherwise you got damage to your prop/skeg if you hit bottom

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  • Pcpete
    replied
    That trim range is limited for a reason. Yes, you can start it in most any drive position, however, above the top of the trim range you are risking a hole in the drive bellows. There are two bellows; the lower is the exhaust and operating the engine with one end off will make the exhaust louder, but not a damage causing condition; the upper bellows covers the double u-joints on the drive shaft. When the drive is tipped up the double u-joint assembly can rub on the bellows creating a hole where you really don't want one. The cost of a new bellows isn't too bad, but the installation cost will get your attention.

    Some guys may have gotten away with starting the engine and doing some maneuvering without a problem, but I'm risk adverse, especially during the summer and the possibility of having to wait for the mechanic to "get to me".

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  • aluxury1
    replied
    you can start it in any position as long as the water intake is under water. If you have a shallow water trailer ramp area, you won't want to exit that area with it down all the way anyways. It might have a safety mechanism built in that you might have to have it in the trim range to start it, I'm not sure. Because you trim button will not bring the outdrive all the way to the up position, just to maximum trim height. But your water intake on the lower unit, just above the propeller level needs water for the impeller, so submerge that. When the prop is very high be careful with the throttle, you can send a lot of water airborne!

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  • Jameson
    started a topic Advice for a novice - please-gctid817107

    Advice for a novice - please-gctid817107

    Hello - I've recently bought a 2005 Capri 175 bow rider with an inboard 3 litre engine.

    I've had it all serviced and finally put it on the river this afternoon.

    Can someone please tell me exactly how low the prop should be lowered before engaging the prop into drive ?

    Is it fully lowered or mid way on the gauge ?

    thanks
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