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    what is the best toilet system?

    This is really the wrong question. It’s raging on another forum but every one is so busy giving their opinion no one has bothered to state the obvious. The best system is the one that can be installed correctly on your boat. Every system has its strengths and weakness. What’s right for my boat may not be right for your boat.

    I have used vacuflushes for 25 years. There is no boat toilet that can function for 25 years. Everything wears out eventually. Now the funny thing is, I buy fairly new complete take out systems from the local yard for 10 cents on the dollar. Sometimes I find an obvious problem, like the vacuum tank having 20 sanitary napkins in it. Well if you don’t use them correctly they won’t work. Other times the yard will let me know that the system was installed so poorly that it was bound to constantly fail and the owner was so frustrated he wanted something different. So what I am saying here is, you need to match your boat to the system and you need to install it correctly. I don’t even think about my toilets for years. Usually once every 5 years I have to replace duck bill valves and once every 10 years I have to rebuild the vacuum pump. Once I had to replace the vacuum switch on one toilet. Then there is the whole discussion on hoses. Hey, vacuum hoses don’t stink, even if you get a hole in one.

    this is not ment to be an argument against macerater toilets. There are some really good macerater tolits out there and they are the only answer for many boats. However if you install one poorly it’s going to be problematic and hose quality is very important.

    Again the installation matters more than the type of system you choose.
    Azzurra
    Seattle, WA
    Ocean Alexander 54

    #2
    Are you refering to the toilet bowl itself or the whole system from what i sit on all the way to ejection outside the boat?

    Comment


      #3
      My current boat has Vacuflush heads. At first I was scared of them because I did not understand how all the parts work together.. Now that I have rebuilt both of mine, and understand how they work, I am happy with them. I’ve had this boat since 2011 and except for my preemptivly rebuilding them, they have been trouble free.

      I have also had Raritan macerating heads. These were great units as well, and I would be comfortable replacing my vacuflush units with the Raritan heads, but I see no reason to do so.

      The only heads I am/was not happy with were the cheapo Jabsco manual heads I had on my several cabin cruisers. Then again, I suppose you get what you pay for, and the Jabsco manual units i has were really entry level, occasional use heads.

      So... What’s the best??? The best head system is easy to work on, and easy to get parts for.

      KEVIN SANDERS
      4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
      where are we right now​​​​​​???​

      https://share.findmespot.com/shared/...j23OquWOj2N3Xe

      Comment


        #4
        I am talking about the whole system, from toilet to holding tank.
        Azzurra
        Seattle, WA
        Ocean Alexander 54

        Comment


          #5
          I have worn out the actual toilet it’s self over 10 years and there are a pair of seals in the toilet that need replacing every 4-5 years. Home systems have so few moving parts that they last 40years. Not the same on a boat.
          Azzurra
          Seattle, WA
          Ocean Alexander 54

          Comment


            #6
            Oh, from the toilet back I MUCH prefer a waste treatment system. I have installed and used Raritans products including the old electra-san, the newer electro-scan, and the older Purasan.

            The one I currently have now and like is the electro-scan with a salt feed. I re-engineered the Raritan salt feed system to make it more reliable and I go through a 40 lb bag of salt about once every three weeks or so as a one person liveaboard.

            Raritan also has a Great product that I use called a hold n treat controller. My heads both empty into the holding tank. The electro-scan is plumbed between the macerator pump and the waste discharge seacock. The Hold n Treat controllers job is to sense the holding tank level and initiate the macerator pump, and waste treatment system so that the holding tank stays empty. When in a no discharge area I simply turn the key to the off position and the system will not discharge any even treated waste in compliance with USCG regulations.

            With this system I get the best of both worlds. I can hold ther waste onboard and have it pumped when necessary, and I can discharge treated waste safely overboard when allowed.

            KEVIN SANDERS
            4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
            where are we right now​​​​​​???​

            https://share.findmespot.com/shared/...j23OquWOj2N3Xe

            Comment


              #7
              Because I could see no discharge zones coming to the PNW, I put Incinolets in my current boat. I didn't want a holding tank and I didn't want a sewage treatment system I couldn't use. I've had the Incinolets since 2011 and like them. Standard toilet seat, standard height. But they need electricity, 120 or 240 AC. I have generators, but my inverter will run them, too. No plumbing, but they have a vent that runs in plastic pipe. No parts failure since new with daily use, very low maintenance, and all stainless, so easy to keep clean. When operating, a blower draws thru the burn pot and so no head smells. Mine exhaust 2 decks above and point to the side, so rarely does anyone get a burning smell. And the smell is a general burning smell like cardboard, not sewage. The really nice part is, unlike a marine toilet, no mess to deal with in the event of a pump or valve failure, no issue with the Coast Guard or any port or marina.

              Comment


                #8
                I get it now. It can be frustrating when whole systems are deemed garbage with little consideration to specific applications and quality installs. Case in point i have a carlisle search light that is not working. Some told me i should rip it out and put in a new fancy LED one. Hold on there buddy, you want me to throw out the best light ever made because it might have a short? Damn.

                kind of interesting as well these days, everything i do or buy im always asking myself, will this last uat least until i die? I absolutly hate doing things over or replacing them, espcially on the boat.

                now for the toilet system, since i inherited it, i can say i got a bit lucky. The toilets are 18 years old and no issues, same with the rest of the system. the comodes are microphor half gallon flush. The water drops everything into the hopper, the flap closes and compressed air shoots it down the pipe at 60psi. All pipes are PVC same as a house with a clean out for easy snaking should the worse happen.

                this goes into a huge treatment tank from microphor as well that uses series of media and germs to eat all that stuff and comes out to a clorinator for final sanitization and the out overboard or a holding tank that ive not used yet. System is rated for 15 people full time, so im well bellow capacity of course.

                so no power is used, valves are simple mechanical devices, adjustable , maintenance adding dry bacteria every 3 months and adding chlorine pucks when it gets low.

                parts are readily available, i have 2 rebuid kits on board i ordered right away for the toilets just to have them in case, and the support is great. Took me a while to understand what i had and the rep is top notch.

                but again, this is on this boat, would not do well on other boats for sure. but i do love it. Mind you lepke setup is something i would look into if i had to do something from scatch.

                On the other hand on our dingy i got what we call the crapitulator! Now that thing is absolutly awesome. A suitcase that unfolds with 3 sturdy legs, a seat and back rest. You put a bag with chemicals in it and poop in luxury anywhere you might be?. Bets my old diving days of a five gallon bucket on deck, that boat did not have any heads, so its all relative.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I do like my Vaccu-flush system. I have owned a number of vessel with electric and manual systems. The Vaccu-flush has some simple seals that will last from one to three years with care but are easy to replace. I keep those seals on board for quick repairs. Convenience in use and odor control. Just have to instruct guest: never stand & pee, never flush more than a few pieces of authorized paper, there is no such thing as a “flushable” baby wipe!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Put a sign in the head, if you have not eaten it or is not toilet paper it does not belong in the toilet.
                    If you plug it up you will need to help unplug it!
                    Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                    Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                    Twin 350 GM power
                    Located in Seward, AK
                    Retired marine surveyor

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Lepke what model boat did you put the Incinolets into? I have been reading about them after reading your post above but from what I can see there is no way one will fit into my 3888.
                      P/C Bob Hicks JN
                      Dock Holiday, 1992 Bayliner 3888 Double Cabin Flybridge Cruiser
                      Twin Hino W04TI 210 HP Diesels with Hurth HSW630A 2.0:1 Trannys
                      Westerbeke 8.0 BTD-614 8KW Genset
                      Avon 9 ft 6 in Tender with a Tohatsu M8B 8HP outboard
                      Currently moored at Stones in Nanamio, B.C.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I have a 53 year old Wilcox Crittenden Skipper in my boat. My next boat will have one too!

                        The thing is simple and the nickname it has been bestowed is the "Corn Cob Crusher" I will let your imagination work that one out!

                        Even better if you fresh water flush em!
                        Currently sailing: Spencer 42 Sloop Hull #7

                        Looking at a 3888.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I've been considering upgrading to the electric flush for convenience and to not have to keep explaining how the pump works. Along with that upgrade comes the decision to continue to use sea water or to plumb into the fresh water system.

                          Those of you who have upgraded - fresh water flush or sea water flush pros and cons?

                          Paul
                          US Army (Retired), Federal Way, WA

                          1990 Bayliner 3288 - the "Janna Lea"
                          MMSI: 338181912

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by O1dSoldier View Post
                            I've been considering upgrading to the electric flush for convenience and to not have to keep explaining how the pump works. Along with that upgrade comes the decision to continue to use sea water or to plumb into the fresh water system.

                            Those of you who have upgraded - fresh water flush or sea water flush pros and cons?
                            if I had big tanks and good access to fresh water, I would go fresh water flush, sea water has lots of absorbed solids in it, and thus it is going to gum up the inside of your toilet system eventually and you will be having to rebuild or replace all the calcified components.
                            Currently sailing: Spencer 42 Sloop Hull #7

                            Looking at a 3888.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              My 32 has a ~90 gallon water tank currently not used for drinking and we don't take extended trips (though one day we will, I hope) so a water shortage isn't an issue at this point. I haven't had the boat long enough to see any problems with calcification but the odor left by the dead and decaying saltwater critters can be noticeable hence the convenience factor of not having to do a fresh water flush anyway to rinse out the seawater from the bowl.

                              Paul
                              US Army (Retired), Federal Way, WA

                              1990 Bayliner 3288 - the "Janna Lea"
                              MMSI: 338181912

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