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Need a new Long Block and can't source one??

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    Need a new Long Block and can't source one??

    Hello all, Had a motor issue in the late summer and it turns out water was getting in the cylinders of my EH700 on My 3870. We are removing the old motor and can't source another block anywhere up here in Canada. Does anyone have knowledge of where I could source this?. The old one is done, won't go over 2800 rpm and we have removed a lot of water from the oil pan, so I'm getting rid of it. Heat exchangers are cleaned and resoldered, and riser elbows are are new Stainless, so this shouldn't happen again. thanks for any info in advance. Cheers and Merry Christmas!!

    #2
    Shouldn't need a block - as I recall you would maybe need to pull heads and do liners but shouldn't be a need for a long block.

    Fill the block with diesel, drain, repeat. Assuming you didn't bend a rod or valve in the process of water getting in the engine I don't see why you might need to replace the block.
    1999 Sandpiper Pilothouse - Current
    1989 3888 - 2011-2019, 1985 Contessa - 2005-2011, 1986 21' Trophy 1998-2005
    Nobody gets out alive.

    Comment


      #3
      I agree. It’s very possible that the problem is the copper liner for the injectors. As to the block, the whole thing can be rebuilt right where it is. These are what the car makers call a modular engine. Each piston, rod and connecting rod comes as a unit. So, once the head is off, an the oil pan removed, it’s a matter of removing the connecting rod caps and removing the entire sleeve. Piston and all. You can do one or all six. https://www.marinepartssupply.com/book/18/600/
      That’s why you are having problems finding a long block. Very few come out of the frame or mount.
      Next, buy your parts from the truck or heavy equipment dealer. You may need to do some interpolation of part numbers, but the core engine is a truck, bus, generator and heavy equipment motor.
      Also, contact Earl “the Bayliner Guru”. He can give you guidance on exactly how to proceed. [email protected] Earl can probably give you the part numbers you are going to need. He fixed the muffed rebuild of my port engine just before I bought the boat and I was able to sit and hand him wrench’s (l’m a card carrying gear head) as he did a final torquing of the head a valve adjustment.
      P/C Pete
      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
      MMSI 367770440

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks for the invaluable information you guys. I'm seeing some light at the end of the tunnel. I'll get ahold of Earl, after the holidays. All the best!!

        Comment


          #5
          Is there a reason you are removing the engine? Whatever you do, you’re going to have to protect the salon sole. In home remodeling, the standard product is called Ramboard. It’s thick cardboard and comes in a roll. You can put the salon hatch to the side, cover the carpet or whatever and trust that you won’t ruin the sole. Getting the starboard engine out or out of the way means removing a section of the salon floor structure, I believe. If you look at the cross members under the sub floor you’ll find that they are resting in crotches. The subfloor is screwed under the carpet, which continues under the bar. So, the bar gets disassembled, then the carpet comes up, then the deck section can be unscrewed and removed. That is unless a previous owner added something on the engine room side. If it’s the port motor, then you take the starboard engine out so you can slide the port engine across to remove it through the same access as the starboard. I’m not an expert, I haven’t seen it in process, but that’s my analysis of how to get one out to a shop.
          Repairing or rebuilding it in place will be less comfortable, but more economical imo.
          I suggest adding a few LED RV dome lights to the engine room. Mine are double sided with one mounted on the outboard side of the starboard engine, one between the engines about even with the radiator caps and the last in front of the generator. I already converted the Bayliner installed lights to led, so the total draw is less than the incandescent bulbs. And I can see stuff without requiring a flashlight.
          P/C Pete
          Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
          1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
          Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
          MMSI 367770440

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Pcpete View Post
            Is there a reason you are removing the engine? Whatever you do, you’re going to have to protect the salon sole. In home remodeling, the standard product is called Ramboard. It’s thick cardboard and comes in a roll. You can put the salon hatch to the side, cover the carpet or whatever and trust that you won’t ruin the sole. Getting the starboard engine out or out of the way means removing a section of the salon floor structure, I believe. If you look at the cross members under the sub floor you’ll find that they are resting in crotches. The subfloor is screwed under the carpet, which continues under the bar. So, the bar gets disassembled, then the carpet comes up, then the deck section can be unscrewed and removed. That is unless a previous owner added something on the engine room side. If it’s the port motor, then you take the starboard engine out so you can slide the port engine across to remove it through the same access as the starboard. I’m not an expert, I haven’t seen it in process, but that’s my analysis of how to get one out to a shop.
            Repairing or rebuilding it in place will be less comfortable, but more economical imo.
            I suggest adding a few LED RV dome lights to the engine room. Mine are double sided with one mounted on the outboard side of the starboard engine, one between the engines about even with the radiator caps and the last in front of the generator. I already converted the Bayliner installed lights to led, so the total draw is less than the incandescent bulbs. And I can see stuff without requiring a flashlight.
            I recommend floor protection if any major work is being done to the engines, even if they are not being removed.

            Here are before and after images of mt 3788 when the factory reman engines were installed. Notice the floor protection. Also notice the lighting difference. In the first photo the original lights are installed, with LED bulbs. Before the reman engines were installed, the factory light were replaced with 12VDC LED lights. A couple of extra lights were installed outboard of the engines. I ordered the lights from a truck parts supplier. They are normally installed in trailers or cargo bodies.

            Click image for larger version

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            1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
            2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
            Anacortes, WA

            Comment


              #7
              update: After months of waiting for parts, having everything cleaned and rebuilt,(aside from the main engine), we are still not on the boat. We have decided to rebuild the old block. All parts are now present (Japan did not ship parts during Covid shut down), but all is in place. Taking the motor out was tough. We will have to rebuild block and put it back in the boat and finish rebuild in place before run up. This makes me nervous to say the least. Mechanic we hired has taken another job and work in not progressing. I can't find anyone to take the job, so I'm stuck. Has anyone ever replaced just one motor with another brand?. Im not sure about doing this, but I would consider it if the rebuild goes south and I need another engine.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Bradster1 View Post
                ...... We will have to rebuild block and put it back in the boat and finish rebuild in place before run up.....
                Most diesel rebuilders will run an engine outside of the boat, before installing it, since it's a lot easier to catch and fix things this way. Some parts may need to be removed after the engine run-up, in order to fit it in the boat.

                Here's one of the engines that went in my boat: https://youtu.be/5hRTgPIfE9U
                1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
                2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
                Anacortes, WA

                Comment


                  #9
                  I agree with Norton about the test run prior to installation. Do you have any pictures of the process of getting it out? I’m guessing you have the boat and engine in Pender Harbour. Is there a truck shop or industrial equipment shop there or Gibson’s Landing? I’m thinking someone would be interested, even as a side job, could do the work. The engine is just a truck/bus/generator motor with some bolt on conversion parts.
                  P/C Pete
                  Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                  1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                  Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                  MMSI 367770440

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Bradster1 View Post
                    ... I can't find anyone to take the job, so I'm stuck....
                    You may want to contact Earl Summerville. He's a Hino/Bayliner expert and may know someone that can rebuild your engine: [email protected]
                    1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
                    2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
                    Anacortes, WA

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Just for my own understanding, you have the engine out of the boat, have all parts in hand for the rebuild and ready to start final assembly. Is that correct?

                      Comment

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