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The Lies I've Told by Donald Trump

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    The Lies I've Told by Donald Trump

    It seems Trump has set a new record for lies, Don are you listening. Trump is now up to 2,519 false claims for the first 591 days of his presidency, an average of 4.3 per day.
    Trump’s wildly dishonest August was capped by an 83-false-claim week that began Monday, Aug. 27.
    Watching crow being slowly eaten in the PNW.
    The village idiot strikes again.

    #2
    LIKE THESE ?


    SEP 2, 2018


    "....The fact is that African/American unemployment is now the lowest in the history of our country. Same with Asian, Hispanic and almost every other group."

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: Trump was correct about African-Americans and Hispanics, incorrect about Asian-Americans. While the unemployment rates for African-Americans and for Hispanics are at all-time lows, at least since the government started to release this data in the early 1970s, the rate for Asian-Americans is not. The Asian-American rate briefly dropped to a low, 2.0 per cent, in May. (A low, at least, since the government began issuing Asian-American data in 2000.) But the most recent rate at the time Trump spoke, for July, was 3.1 per cent. This was higher than the rate in Obama's last two full months in office -- 3 per cent in November 2016 and 2.8 per cent in December 2016 -- and in multiple months of George W. Bush's second term.

    Filed under:

    Race relations

    Economy

    Jobs AUG 31, 2018

    ".@Rasmussen_Poll just came out at 48% approval rate despite the constant and intense Fake News. Higher than Election Day and higher than President Obama."

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: Rasmussen polls regularly lean toward Republicans. Regardless: Trump's 48 per cent in the Rasmussen poll was not "higher than President Obama." Obama had the exact same approval rating, 48 per cent, in the Rasmussen poll on the equivalent day of his presidency, and Obama left office with a 62 per cent approval rating in Rasmussen.

    Filed under:

    Polls

    Barack Obama

    "The ABC/Washington Post Poll was by far the least accurate one 2 weeks out from the 2016 Election. I call it a suppression poll - but by Election Day they brought us, out of shame, to about even. They will never learn!"

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: There is no evidence the ABC/Washington Post poll was a "suppression poll" intentionally manipulated to suppress Trump's vote. It is also inaccurate to claim that the ABC/Washington Post poll was the least accurate in the election. Its final poll had Clinton winning the popular vote by four percentage points; she won it by two percentage points. A post-election assessment from Costas Panagopoulos, director of the Center for Electoral Politics and Democracy at Fordham University, ranked the poll as the third-most-accurate of 14 major pollsters.

    Filed under:

    Polls

    Media

    Trump has repeated this claim 6 times

    "When I first started I said...'we will cut regulations.' Nobody -- does anybody believe we're going to cut the most in the history of our country? And I did it in much less than two years. More than anybody else done in, you know, in eight years. In a 16-year term! Okay? He didn't quite make it to the 16th, but it was a 16-year term."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: This was a rare instance of Trump modifying one of his regular false claims: this time he said the longest-serving president served "a 16-year term" rather than simply saying he served "16 years," and he implicitly acknowledged Franklin D. Roosevelt's death before the 16-year mark. But we say the modified version is still false. Roosevelt died after just after 12 years.

    Filed under:

    Past presidents

    Trump has repeated this claim 11 times

    "We've already started building the wall, and I can tell you these people are helping us with the wall. We need the wall. We put $1.6 (billion) and now another $1.6 (billion)."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: Construction on Trump's border wall has not started. When Trump has claimed in the past that wall construction has begun, he has appeared to be referring to a project in which a 2.25-mile stretch of existing wall in California is being replaced by a taller wall. That project was proposed in 2009, and the Los Angeles Times reported that Border Patrol spokesperson Jonathan Pacheco told reporters in March: "First and foremost, this isn't Trump's wall. This isn't the infrastructure that Trump is trying to bring in. ... This new wall replacement has absolutely nothing to do with the prototypes that were shown over in the San Diego area." The $1.6 billion Congress allocated to border projects in 2018 is not for the type of giant concrete wall Trump has proposed: spending on that kind of wall is expressly prohibited in the legislation, and much of the congressional allocation is for replacement and reinforcement projects rather than new construction. Trump has requested another $1.6 billion for the 2019 fiscal year, but this has not yet been approved, much less spent.

    Filed under:

    Immigration

    Trump has repeated this claim 27 times

    "We withdrew from the horrible Paris climate accord. It sounds so pretty. It was gonna cost us a fortune and it was going to put us at a tremendous disadvantage -- and we have cleaner air now than anybody. I want clean air. I want crystal clean water. We can do that. We don't have to pay trillions of dollars to other places, we could do it. And, you know, I did that, I said...'I'm going to get just absolutely slaughtered on this one.' Guess what: people understand it. You know China doesn't kick in like till 2030 and Russia kicked in at -- I think it was in '94 and '95 when air was not nearly as good, so they had a different standard. We kicked in immediately and we can't change it. They said, 'Well, you can change it, you have flexibility.' But if we do that all the environmental groups are going to sue us."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: As usual, Trump's description of the Paris climate accord was comprehensively inaccurate. It does not give China more time than the U.S. before it "kicks in," or give China more time than the U.S. to reduce emissions. Rather, it simply allows each nation to set its own voluntary targets. One of China's voluntary targets was to hit peak emissions around 2030. If the U.S. thought its own voluntary targets -- reducing emissions by 26 per cent to 28 per cent by 2025 -- were too burdensome on its economy, it could simply have changed them; Trump did indeed have flexibility, lawsuits or not.

    Filed under:

    Paris climate accord

    China

    Environment

    Trump has repeated this claim 5 times

    "We withdrew from the horrible Paris climate accord. It sounds so pretty. It was gonna cost us a fortune and it was going to put us at a tremendous disadvantage -- and we have cleaner air now than anybody."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: The U.S. does not have the world's cleanest air, according to various environmental rankings. The U.S. ranks 10th in the world for air quality in the Environmental Performance Index, developed by Yale University, Columbia University and the World Economic Forum.

    Filed under:

    Environment

    "Women's unemployment reached the lowest rate in only 65 years. Sorry. Sorry women, I didn't quite get that, but 65 years, not too bad. There was a time when if I said the best in 65 years you'd say good job. Now when I say 65 years, it's like not nearly as good as 'ever,' but I'll tell you what women's unemployment will very shortly be a historic number also."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: This claim was no longer true at the time Trump spoke. It was true as of two months prior: the women's unemployment rate for May, reported in June, was 3.6 per cent, the same as in 1953, 65 years ago. But it was up to 3.9 per cent in July, not even as low as the 3.8 per cent of December 2000, just 18 years prior.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 22 times

    "Do we have any Asian-Americans in the room, please raise your hand. Are you working? Yes. Yes, where? Good. Well you're going to be very -- you're going to like me. We have one. Asian-American unemployment recently achieved the lowest level. Did I do a good job for you?"

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: The unemployment rate for Asian-Americans is not at an all-time low. It briefly dropped to a low, 2.0 per cent, in May. (A low, at least, since the government began issuing Asian-American data in 2000.) But the most recent rate at the time Trump spoke, for July, was 3.1 per cent. This was higher than the rate in Obama's last two full months in office -- 3 per cent in November 2016 and 2.8 per cent in December 2016 -- and in multiple months of George W. Bush's second term.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Jobs

    Race relations

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "We've created almost 500,000, soon it's going to 600,000, manufacturing jobs."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: From January 2017, when Trump took office, through August 2018, the economy had created 348,000 manufacturing jobs.

    Filed under:

    Jobs

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "Four million jobs created since the election. That's unheard of. Nobody thought that was possible."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: It is not true that nobody would have believed 3.9 million jobs could be added over this 20-month period. In the previous 20-month period, under Obama, 4.3 million jobs were added.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Jobs

    Trump has repeated this claim 24 times

    "...One of Dan's competitors, U.S. Steel. I guess that was the biggest company in the world 50 or 60 years ago. And now it was, you know, it was very hurt, very badly hurt, and they're really back, and they announce they're opening up seven or eight new plants."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: Though Trump had been making this claim for two months, there was still no evidence at the time that U.S. Steel is opening seven or eight plants. (Trump originally claimed it was six plants, then later claimed it was seven plants, then eight plants.) At the time Trump spoke, U.S. Steel had only announced a major development at two facilities since he introduced his steel tariffs. First it said it was restarting two shuttered blast furnaces at its plant in Granite City, Illinois, then this week that it was investing $750 million to revitalize a plant in Gary, Indiana.

    Filed under:

    Tariffs

    Steel

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "...One of Dan's competitors, U.S. Steel. I guess that was the biggest company in the world 50 or 60 years ago."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: U.S. Steel was one of the world's biggest companies more than 100 years ago: in the early 1900s, it was the first U.S. corporation with a market capitalization of more than $1 billion. But it was not the biggest company in the world either 50 or 60 years ago, though it was in the upper echelon. Fifty years ago, in 1968, it ranked 10th on the Fortune 500 list, with one fifth of the revenue of General Motors, according to Fortune data. Sixty years ago, in 1958, it ranked fourth on the Fortune 500, but its revenue even then was less than half that of General Motors.

    Filed under:

    Steel

    Exaggeration

    "The hottest industry there is right now is the steel industry, and it was dead as a doornail. We were not going to have a steel industry in a couple of years from now had we not done what we did."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: No expert on the steel industry believes the industry was "dead" or that it would have been nonexistent in "a couple of years" if Trump had not imposed tariffs. The American Iron and Steel Institute said before Trump imposed the tariffs: "The steel industry directly employs around 140,000 people in the United States, and it directly or indirectly supports almost one million U.S. jobs."

    Filed under:

    Trade

    Economy

    Steel

    Tariffs

    Trump has repeated this claim 7 times

    "Last year, we had $817 billion trade deficit. Did you know that, Mr. Meadows? Eight hundred and seventeen -- not million, but billion. A year! Eight hundred and seventeen."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: The 2017 U.S. trade deficit was $566 billion. There is some basis for Trump's claim: the 2017 deficit was $810 billion if you count only trade in goods and do not count trade in services. But Trump, as usual, did not say he was doing so.

    Filed under:

    Trade

    Economy

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 34 times

    "You know, we did a lot for the vets: Choice. We got Choice approved; Forty-six years they tried to get Choice approved. Couldn't do it, and we got it done. That means the vet goes in he has to -- you know, some of them wait on line for two days, five days, 20 days, 30 days, 50 days. Some of 'em never get to see a doctor. Now they go out. They see a doctor, we pay for it. And you want to know something: we actually, number one most importantly, we take care of our great vets. But number two, we save money. It's much less expensive. And they're so happy. For 46 years they've been trying to get it through. It's hard to get things through, but I'm good at getting things through."

    Source: Fundraiser for North Carolina Republican candidates

    in fact: The Veterans Choice program, which allows some veterans facing long waits in the veterans' health system to see private doctors, was passed in 2014 under Obama. The law Trump signed in 2018 made changes to the existing program.

    Filed under:

    Health care

    Trump has repeated this claim 10 times

    "But I jokingly said last night, I said, 'Women, I'm so sorry. I'm so sorry,' because we have Asian, African-American, Hispanic -- almost all -- the best in history. Women unemployment, it's only 65 years. So I said it last night, and I said, 'I'm sorry. I'm trying hard.' But it's the best number they've had in 65 years. But that's as good as history. But I think that within about three to four weeks, Deb -- three to four weeks, I think what you're going to have is you'll have the best in history also. Because 65 years, we'll take that any day. But we're going to have something special."

    Source: Speech at signing of executive order on retirement security

    in fact: This claim about women was no longer true at the time Trump spoke. It was true as of two months prior: the women's unemployment rate for May, reported in June, was 3.6 per cent, the same as in 1953, 65 years ago. But it was up to 3.9 per cent in July, not even as low as the 3.8 per cent of December 2000, just 18 years prior.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 22 times

    "But a lot of folks have come out in favor of what I am doing because they see what's happening and how great it's been for the African-American community, for the Hispanic American community, where unemployment has reached the lowest level also ever recorded. Likewise, for the Asian community, lowest ever recorded."

    Source: Speech at signing of executive order on retirement security

    in fact: Trump was correct on the first two, incorrect on the last one. While the unemployment rates for African-Americans and for Hispanics are at all-time lows, at least since the government started to release this data in the early 1970s, the rate for Asian-Americans is not. The Asian-American rate briefly dropped to a low, 2.0 per cent, in May. (A low, at least, since the government began issuing Asian-American data in 2000.) But the most recent rate at the time Trump spoke, for July, was 3.1 per cent. This was higher than the rate in Obama's last two full months in office -- 3 per cent in November 2016 and 2.8 per cent in December 2016 -- and in multiple months of George W. Bush's second term.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Jobs

    Race relations

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "So, already under our booming economy, retirement accounts and 401(k)s have flourished, and the stock market has gone up at levels that nobody thought possible. Depending on which market you want to look at -- over 50 per cent, over 40 per cent, 47 per cent -- all of them. They're going through the roof."

    Source: Speech at signing of executive order on retirement security

    in fact: U.S. stock markets are not up by that much since Trump took office. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up about 31 per cent at the time Trump spoke. The S&P 500 Index was up about 28 per cent.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Exaggeration

    "But you have to see what's happening with the steel industry. You don't get it. I mean, they don't tell you about it. Jobs are being produced. Plants are opening. U.S. Steel is opening up at least eight new plants."

    Source: Speech at signing of executive order on retirement security

    in fact: Though Trump had been making this claim for two months, there was still no evidence at the time that U.S. Steel is opening eight plants. (Trump originally claimed it was six plants, then later claimed it was seven plants, then eight plants.) At the time Trump spoke, U.S. Steel had only announced a major development at two facilities since he introduced his steel tariffs. First it said it was restarting two shuttered blast furnaces at its plant in Granite City, Illinois, then this week that it was investing $750 million to revitalize a plant in Gary, Indiana.

    Filed under:

    Tariffs

    Steel

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "If you look at steel, steel was a dead business. They were closing up one plant after another."

    Source: Speech at signing of executive order on retirement security

    in fact: The U.S. steel industry was not "dead" or nearing extinction before Trump imposed his tariffs, though many large steel mills had indeed closed. The American Iron and Steel Institute said then: "The steel industry directly employs around 140,000 people in the United States, and it directly or indirectly supports almost one million U.S. jobs."

    Filed under:

    Trade

    Economy

    Steel

    Tariffs

    Trump has repeated this claim 7 times

    "And I just have to say, because it is funny. I just said -- because, you know, I just -- you know the way I feel. I gave an interview yesterday to Bloomberg Business. And I said 'off the record,' and I made a statement about Canada, which is fine, because I love Canada...But I gave a totally off-the-record -- you saw it -- it said, 'off the record.' And I said something strong, but it's my belief. And they violated it. And they said they were violating it. It's unbelievable what's happening with the fake news. It's unbelievable. When you say off the record, that's a very -- it's not a legal term, but it's a term of honor. So when I say 'off the record, here's the story,' in order, really, to save time -- I don't want to waste a lot of time -- and then they say -- they actually printed my off-the-record. They said, "President Trump said, off the record" and then they go on this."

    Source: Speech at signing of executive order on retirement security

    in fact: Trump's remarks were vague, but it is certainly false that Bloomberg "said they were violating" their off-the-record promise to Trump. The Toronto Star, not Bloomberg, published these remarks after obtaining them from a source; in their public comments, Bloomberg spokespeople said the company respects its off-the-record agreements, not that it was breaking its agreement with the president.

    Filed under:

    Media

    "They don't take care of our military. They don't take care of our vets. We're taking great care of our vets. What we're doing for our vets -- Choice, Accountability. How about, after 48 years, we got Choice approved. So veterans now can go, and if they have a long wait, they say bye-bye, I'm going to see the doctor next door, and we pay for the bill."

    Source: Speech at signing of executive order on retirement security

    in fact: The Veterans Choice program, which allows some veterans facing long waits in the veterans' health system to see private doctors, was passed in 2014 under Obama. The law Trump signed in 2018 made changes to the existing program.

    Filed under:

    Health care

    Trump has repeated this claim 10 times

    "And I'm going to be doing a little work over the weekend. I'm going to be studying, you know, the federal workers in Washington that you've been reading so much about. People don't want to give them any increase. They haven't had one in a long time."

    Source: Speech at signing of executive order on retirement security

    in fact: It has not been "a long time" since federal workers received a pay raise. According to the Washington Post: "After three years of frozen pay rates from 2011 to 2013, federal workers received raises of 1, 1, 1.3 and 2.1 per cent from 2014 through 2017. The latter two figures are averages, since part of each raise was paid out in differing amounts, varying by locality." For this year, Trump approved a 1.4 per cent increase.

    Filed under:

    Trump White House

    "Charlotte has been a great place for us. And I actually have investments in Charlotte. They'll say, 'Oh, there's a conflict of interest.' The fake news, they'll say, 'There's a conflict.' You know where my club is, right? Trump National. And it's a very big success on Lake Norman. Beautiful. Largest man-made lake in the world, by far. Right? The electric company. Had to be more than man-made. That was made with a lot of money for a long time."

    Source: Speech at signing of executive order on retirement security

    in fact: Lake Norman is not even close to the biggest man-made lake in the world, nor even in the United States. Lake Mead, in Nevada, holds 25 times more water.

    Filed under:

    Exaggeration AUG 30, 2018

    "And I can tell you one thing. Iran is not looking at the Mediterranean any longer. And hopefully that will all work out between us and Iran. But they have to live by a certain set of rules. That was a terrible, terrible deal. Remember, they were given $150 billion."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: The "$150 billion" figure has no basis. Experts said Iran had about $100 billion in worldwide assets at the time; after the nuclear deal unfroze Iranian assets, Iran was able to access a percentage of that $100 billion, but not all of it. PolitiFact reported: "The actual amount available to Iran is about $60 billion, estimates Garbis Iradian, chief economist at the Institute of International Finance. U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew pinned it at $56 billion, while Iranian officials say $35 billion, according to Richard Nephew, an expert on economic sanctions at Columbia University's Center on Global Energy Policy."

    Filed under:

    Middle East

    Exaggeration

    Iran

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "We're defending American values and we're also defending our great American interests all over the world. We've secured a record $700 billion for our military this year and $716 billion, another record, next year."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: Neither of these military budgets was a record, even if you ignore inflation. Obama signed a $725 billion version of the same bill in 2011.

    Filed under:

    Military

    Trump has repeated this claim 15 times

    "We passed Veterans Choice. Our veterans are the greatest. You know, when I got involved, I said, that's a bad situation going over with the vets. They're really being treated badly. These are, really, our greatest people, as far as I'm concerned. And...The vets would wait on line to see a doctor six days, nine days, 21 days, 34 days. Some of them would have a minor condition. By the time they saw the doctor, they were terminally ill. And I said, we're not going to let that happen. And I came up with an idea that I thought was brilliant. I said, 'You know what, we have all these doctors, some of them really good, talented doctors, surrounding and in the neighborhoods closer than where the vets are trying to get taken care of. We're going to let the vets go and see those doctors, and we're going to pay their bill, right?' And I said -- I said, 'This is so brilliant.' And then I presented it to Congress, and the Congress went, 'Yes, sir, we've been trying to pass this bill 45 years. So this is common sense, wouldn't you think?' The problem is, they couldn't get it passed. We got it passed. It's called Veterans Choice. The veterans have a choice. They can go here or they go out to see a doctor. We pay the bill."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: The Veterans Choice program, which allows some veterans facing long waits in the veterans' health system to see private doctors, was passed in 2014 under Obama; it was not Trump's idea. The law Trump signed in 2018 simply made changes to the existing program.

    Filed under:

    Health care

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "You remember two weeks ago, Pfizer -- and I take my hat off to them -- I like them -- they increased their prices substantially of drugs. And I got angry about it. I think it's probably the first time I realized what great power we have here. I got angry."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: Pfizer's price increase and subsequent reversal happened seven weeks prior, not "two weeks ago." Trump regularly moves up the date of good news to make it sound like a more recent development.

    Filed under:

    Drugs

    "And one that people love because they said it would be impossible to do, our tax bill saves small businesses and family farms, ranches, and all of the other things associated with -- if you died, you pay a big tax and your children lose it. We have gotten rid of the estate tax, also known as the death tax."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: Trump has not eliminated the estate tax. His tax law merely raised the threshold at which it must be paid.

    Filed under:

    Taxes

    Farmers

    "And U.S. Steel is opening up at least seven plants, and they're going to be spending billions of dollars building new stuff. I'll tell you what, steel. We were dead. It was over."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: The U.S. steel industry was not "dead" or nearing extinction before Trump imposed his tariffs, though the industry was obviously much smaller than it was at the heyday of large integrated steel mills. The American Iron and Steel Institute said then: "The steel industry directly employs around 140,000 people in the United States, and it directly or indirectly supports almost one million U.S. jobs."

    Filed under:

    Trade

    Economy

    Steel

    Tariffs

    Trump has repeated this claim 7 times

    "And U.S. Steel is opening up at least seven plants, and they're going to be spending billions of dollars building new stuff."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: Though Trump had been making this claim for two months, there was still no evidence at the time that U.S. Steel is opening seven plants. (Trump originally claimed it was six plants, then later claimed it was seven plants, then eight plants.) At the time Trump spoke, U.S. Steel had only announced a major development at two facilities since he introduced his steel tariffs. First it said it was restarting two shuttered blast furnaces at its plant in Granite City, Illinois, then this week that it was investing $750 million to revitalize a plant in Gary, Indiana.

    Filed under:

    Tariffs

    Steel

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "We've increased exports of clean, beautiful coal, one of our great resources, that they wanted to close up, by -- listen to this, by 60 per cent, in just this little short period of time, six-oh." And: "We've ended the war on clean coal."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: Trump's number is right, but the term "clean coal" is false in itself. Trump was referring to a 60 per cent increase in overall coal exports; there is nothing "clean" about this coal. Even if one were to believe that there is indeed "clean coal," a term that is the creation of industry spin, the term is not meant to be applied to all coal, which is how Trump uses it. The phrase, the New York Times reported, "is often understood to mean coal plants that capture the carbon dioxide emitted from smokestacks and bury it underground as a way of limiting global warming." As the Washington Post wrote: "Saying that the United States exported clean coal is like saying that the United States is shipping bathrobes overseas each time a shipping container full of cotton leaves an American port. Maybe it will be a bathrobe, but that's not what we're sending."

    Filed under:

    Energy

    Trump has repeated this claim 11 times

    "We've added almost 500,000 new manufacturing jobs since election, 500,000."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: The economy added 378,000 manufacturing jobs between November 2016 and August 2018, according to the August jobs report released a week after Trump spoke.

    Filed under:

    Jobs

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "All right, women. This is not good. So African-American historic, Asian-American, Hispanic American, all historic, right? Sorry, women, I let you down again. Women's unemployment rate recently reached only the lowest rate in 65 years. I let you down, I'm sorry. What can I do? But I predict -- 65 years for women. Most of the rest are historic. The women -- I promise you, I think, I better say I think, within three or four weeks, you'll also be at historic levels, I think, 65 years. We'll say, 65 years is not good enough."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: This claim was no longer true at the time Trump spoke. It was true as of two months prior: the women's unemployment rate for May, reported in June, was 3.6 per cent, the same as in 1953, 65 years ago. But it was up to 3.9 per cent in July, not even as low as the 3.8 per cent of December 2000, just 18 years prior.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Jobs

    Trump has repeated this claim 22 times

    "And the failing New York Times, which, by the way, if I wasn't here, those -- they would be out of business, the Washington Post, the New York Times, CNN."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: We don't usually fact-check Trump's hypotheticals, but this is transparently absurd.

    Filed under:

    Media

    "Hispanic Americans and Asian-Americans, the unemployment have recently reached their lowest rates in the history of our country."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: Trump was correct on the first one, incorrect on the last one. While the unemployment rates for Hispanics is at an all-time low, at least since the government started to release this data in the early 1970s, the rate for Asian-Americans is not. The Asian-American rate briefly dropped to a low, 2.0 per cent, in May. (A low, at least, since the government began issuing Asian-American data in 2000.) But the most recent rate at the time Trump spoke, for July, was 3.1 per cent. This was higher than the rate in Obama's last two full months in office -- 3 per cent in November 2016 and 2.8 per cent in December 2016 -- and in multiple months of George W. Bush's second term.

    Filed under:

    Jobs

    Economy

    Race relations

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "And the beauty of the jobs, people that were stock in one job, didn't like it, they've now got six different alternatives. They go here. They get one that they like. And they're making more money. Wages are going up. Nobody thought this was going to happen. Excuse me, you ready? 3.8 per cent. Isn't that nice? Nobody thought that was going to happen."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: It is not true that nobody expected wages to rise under Trump: wages have been rising since 2014. (It is not clear what Trump meant by "3.8" -- perhaps he was referring to the unemployment rate of 3.9 per cent.) Wage growth was 2.7 per cent in July, the same as it was in Obama's last full month in office, December 2016. Adjusting for inflation, wages were actually down 0.2 per cent year-over-year as of July.

    Filed under:

    Jobs

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 26 times

    "Because they are not liking my poll numbers even a little bit. And within the Republican Party -- I have to say this, because this is very cool -- within the Republican Party, the highest poll numbers -- I think it's -- well, they have 90 per cent, they have 92 per cent, and they have 93 per cent. The highest poll numbers ever. Ever. Is that crazy? I actually asked them, I said, 'Did they do polling when Honest Abe Lincoln was around?' You know what? Nobody's been able to give me that answer, but I'm assuming they did, OK? So we can say we're beating Honest Abe."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: Trump does not have the highest poll numbers of all time among Republicans; George W. Bush had Republican approval ratings as high as 99 per cent after the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. Contrary to Trump's assumption, there was no scientific polling on public opinion of the president during Lincoln's presidency in the 1800s.

    Filed under:

    Polls

    Past presidents

    Republicans

    Trump has repeated this claim 6 times

    "We've now started the wall in San Diego, and we're doing another ninety. It's like pulling teeth to get the money from these Democrats. We got $1.6 billion, then we just got another $1.6 billion. Now we're asking for a lot more. We can do that thing so quickly."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: Construction on Trump's border wall has not started. When Trump has claimed in the past that wall construction has begun, he has appeared to be referring to a project in which a 2.25-mile stretch of existing wall in California is being replaced by a taller wall. That project was proposed in 2009, and the Los Angeles Times reported that Border Patrol spokesperson Jonathan Pacheco told reporters in March: "First and foremost, this isn't Trump's wall. This isn't the infrastructure that Trump is trying to bring in. ... This new wall replacement has absolutely nothing to do with the prototypes that were shown over in the San Diego area." The $1.6 billion Congress allocated to border projects in 2018 is not for the type of giant concrete wall Trump has proposed: spending on that kind of wall is expressly prohibited in the legislation, and much of the congressional allocation is for replacement and reinforcement projects rather than new construction. Trump has requested another $1.6 billion for the 2019 fiscal year, but this has not yet been approved, much less spent.

    Filed under:

    Immigration

    Trump has repeated this claim 27 times

    "Governor, look how many cameras you have back there. Is this -- like the Academy Awards. Look at it. They can't get enough. But when I start screaming fake news, you see those red lights go off for a little while. You know, 'Excuse me, we have technical difficulties.' OK, then they go back. Right? Look at this. You know, in the studio, you hear, they go, listen, he's about ready to go. 'Look, ladies and gentlemen, we have technical difficulties, we'll be back in just about' -- then he goes back. 'OK, we're back, here we go, keep going.'"

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: This is one of Trump's regular rally lies. There is no evidence that any television network has cut away from him or turned off its camera when he has complained about "fake news."

    Filed under:

    Media

    Trump has repeated this claim 5 times

    "And I just saw a poll just a little while ago, a real poll -- you know, they have fake polls. They do suppression polls. You know what a fake poll is. It's called a suppression. They make you think you can't win, so you go to see a movie."

    Source: Campaign rally in Evansville, Indiana

    in fact: There is no evidence that pollsters have manipulated their numbers to suppress Trump's vote.

    Filed under:

    Polls

    Trump has repeated this claim 6 times

    "The wall's happening. By the way, I've already started the wall...We're building. We're building actually 80 miles of the wall right now. The wall is already started. You know the -- as you know it's in San Diego. It's almost complete all up San Diego in a very bad stretch and we're building the wall in the bad stretches. You know the stretches."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: Construction on Trump's border wall has not started. When Trump has claimed in the past that wall construction has begun, he has appeared to be referring to a project in which a 2.25-mile stretch of existing wall in California is being replaced by a taller wall. That project was proposed in 2009, and the Los Angeles Times reported that Border Patrol spokesperson Jonathan Pacheco told reporters in March: "First and foremost, this isn't Trump's wall. This isn't the infrastructure that Trump is trying to bring in. ... This new wall replacement has absolutely nothing to do with the prototypes that were shown over in the San Diego area." The $1.6 billion Congress allocated to border projects in 2018 is not for the type of giant concrete wall Trump has proposed: spending on that kind of wall is expressly prohibited in the legislation, and much of the congressional allocation is for replacement and reinforcement projects rather than new construction. Trump has requested another $1.6 billion for the 2019 fiscal year, but this has not yet been approved, much less spent.

    Filed under:

    Immigration

    Trump has repeated this claim 27 times

    "The advantage we have is -- I am actually a very popular president, which people don't like to say, you know. In fact, I guess the Republican poll came out, there's one at 92 and one at 93 and one at 90, and they're the highest numbers that have ever been, with the exception of a tiny period of time with a bullhorn. But that period lasted for about a week."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: By "with the exception of a tiny period of time with a bullhorn," Trump was referring to George W. Bush's poll numbers after the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. (Bush famously spoke through a bullhorn on a visit to Ground Zero on September 14, 2001.) Trump, however, was wrong that Bush's superior post-9/11 popularity among Republicans lasted only "for about a week." In an ABC poll three weeks after the attacks, Bush had a 99 per cent approval rating among Republicans. In a Gallup poll more than three months after the attacks, Bush had a 98 per cent approval rating among Republicans.

    Filed under:

    Polls

    Republicans

    Past presidents

    "I have a very good relationship with Angela Merkel. An excellent relationship. I just disagree. I don't think she should be buying oil for Russia -- from Russia. I don't think that, you know, she should be paying 1 per cent and we're paying 4.3 per cent for NATO. You know, I have a lot of disagreements with her."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: The U.S. does not spend 4.3 per cent of GDP on defence. It is spending 3.5 per cent, according to an official NATO estimate released the month prior, down slightly from 3.57 per cent in 2017.

    Filed under:

    NATO

    Military

    Trump has repeated this claim 5 times

    "I'll tell you, there are some moments where we say, wow, that really is bad what they're doing. You know, we just put something up yesterday on Google where they were promoting Obama, Obama, Obama -- the day I got to office for the same event, which was the State of the Union speech, the day I got to office, they -- it was like, dead."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: Trump was referring to an inaccurate video he had posted on Twitter. The video purported to show that Google promoted Obama's State of the Union addresses on its search home page but not Trump's own State of the Union Addresses. While Google did not promote Trump's first address to a joint session of Congress, in 2017, this was not regarded an official State of the Union, since he had just taken office; Google also did not promote Obama's first address to a joint session, in 2009. The video also purported to show that Google did not promote Trump's first actual State of the Union, in 2018. In fact, it did do so, in the exact same way it did so for Obama. As the Associated Press reported: "For 2018, several web pages captured by Wayback Machine (internet archive site) show the Google homepage advertising a livestream of Trump's speech with the words: 'Live! Watch President Trump's State of the Union address on YouTube.'"

    Filed under:

    Google

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    Bloomberg: "There are some in the legal community that say you could prove that if there was a pattern of Michael (Cohen) making payments over a long period of years, then -- then it would be argued that it was..." Trump: "Jennifer, there was no campaign violation -- all of them." Bloomberg: "...if those payments would have been to protect the Trump business brand." Trump: "All I'm saying is this -- every lawyer that everybody's spoken to said there's no campaign violation. So." Bloomberg: "Not every lawyer." Trump: "Well, other than the fake news..." Bloomberg: "The federal prosecutors."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: As Bloomberg noted, it is not true that "every lawyer that everybody's spoken to" said that Trump's ex-lawyer Michael Cohen did not commit the campaign finance crimes to which he pleaded guilty. Many lawyers believe that Cohen did indeed commit these crimes.

    Filed under:

    Michael Cohen

    Trump has repeated this claim 3 times

    "I do ask, why didn't the FBI take the server from the DNC? And why didn't they do it? They didn't take it. I mean, what kind of -- you mean they wouldn't give it, they wouldn't give it to them, they would not give their server. I mean, Jennifer, you've figured that one out too a long time ago. And I do say, Awan from Pakistan, he had three servers, all with congressional medal -- congressional people. They just settled the case with him, they gave him nothing. And they -- and they never got the servers."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: There is no basis for Trump's server-related claims about Imran Awan, a former information technology employee for Democrats in the House of Representatives. Awan, a Pakistani-American who obtained U.S. citizenship in 2004, pleaded guilty in 2018 to making false statements on a bank loan application. But in that plea deal, the federal government issued a lengthy statement making clear that the Trump-promoted conspiracy theories about Awan and servers were baseless. Prosecutors wrote that they had conducted a "thorough" investigation, which included interviews with about 40 witnesses and an examination of computers and devices, and "uncovered no evidence that your client violated federal law with respect to the House computer systems. Particularly, the government has found no evidence that your client illegally removed House data from the House network or from House members' offices, stole the House Democratic Caucus server, stole or destroyed House information technology equipment, or improperly accessed or transferred government information, including classified or sensitive information."

    Filed under:

    Democrats

    Trump has repeated this claim 5 times

    "There was no collusion. I think almost everybody, even in your business, is saying there just is no collusion. There were no Russians. If there were, you would have known about it. There was collusion between the Democrats and the DNC and Russia."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: The claim that Democrats colluded with Russia is simple nonsense: the word "collusion" -- in common language, a "secret agreement or co-operation especially for an illegal or deceitful purpose" -- just does not apply to Democrats' Russia-related activities. The accusation is based on the fact that the British ex-spy who produced a research dossier on the Trump campaign's alleged links to Russia, which was funded in part by Clinton's campaign, used Russian sources in compiling his information. That does not come close to meeting the definition of "collusion."

    Filed under:

    Democrats

    Election

    Russian ties

    Trump has repeated this claim 26 times

    "There was no collusion. I think almost everybody, even in your business, is saying there just is no collusion. There were no Russians. If there were, you would have known about it."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: It is not true that "almost everybody," including almost everybody in the media business, says there is no collusion between Trump's campaign and Russia. Some media commentators believe there is already proof of collusion; most reporters have refrained from rendering a judgment either way, noting that special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into the matter has not been completed. (It was not clear what Trump meant by "there were no Russians.")

    Filed under:

    Election

    Russian ties

    Trump has repeated this claim 19 times

    "I put on judges that -- when I got here, I had 145 openings. Nobody's ever had that before. And that was because something happened in the last three years of Obama where he didn't put judges on. I think they forgot. I really do, I believe they forgot."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: Trump inherited 105 vacancies on district courts and courts of appeal, not 145. And Obama did not forget to appoint federal judges. What actually happened was that Senate Republicans executed what Politico in 2016 called a "historic judge blockade" against Obama's nominees. Under Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's leadership, the Republicans used a variety of procedural tactics in 2015 and 2016 to grind the nomination process to a near-halt -- confirming the fewest judges of any Congress since the 1950s. Politico reported in 2016: "In 2015, the Republican Senate majority ushered through confirmations for 11 circuit and district court judges. So far in 2016, nine have been confirmed. That's 20 confirmed this Congress -- the lowest number since the 82nd Congress in 1951-52, which confirmed just 18 judges, according to the Congressional Research Service. Harry S. Truman was president at the time. The CRS retains data on judicial confirmations dating to 1945."

    Filed under:

    Barack Obama

    Congress

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "So we're doing tariffs, and we are in a war, in a sense, because we have been ripped off so badly by past presidents that should never have allowed this to happen. Last year, we lost $800 billion on trade. Because of bad trade deals. Not last year -- for years. But we lost $800 billion on trade. How the hell do you do that?"

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: The U.S. has never had an $800 billion overall trade deficit, and the 2017 deficit was $566 billion. There is some basis for Trump's claim: the 2017 deficit was $810 billion if you count only trade in goods and do not count trade in services. But Trump, as usual, did not say he was doing so.

    Filed under:

    Trade

    Economy

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 34 times

    "The aluminum business is doing much better. It was -- it was a dead business. There's so -- and I only charged 10 per cent on that one because of that. It's a -- you know, it's -- it was a little more delicate."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: Aluminum was not a "dead business" before Trump's tariffs. The Aluminum Association said in early 2018: "Today, the U.S. aluminum industry directly employs 161,000 workers and indirectly employs an additional 551,000 workers."

    Filed under:

    Steel

    Tariffs

    Trade

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 7 times

    "You call up the head of U.S. Steel, chief executive officer, what's his name? Great guy. He's -- he's opening up six or seven plants, he's going to open up others, he's spending billions of dollars."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: Though Trump had been making this claim for two months, there was still no evidence at the time that U.S. Steel is opening six or seven plants. (Trump originally claimed it was six plants, then later claimed it was seven plants, then eight plants.) At the time Trump spoke, U.S. Steel had only announced a major development at two facilities since he introduced his steel tariffs. First it said it was restarting two shuttered blast furnaces at its plant in Granite City, Illinois, then this week that it was investing $750 million to revitalize a plant in Gary, Indiana.

    Filed under:

    Steel

    Tariffs

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "Look at the European Union -- Union, it's as restrictive as any single country in the world -- including China. European Union doesn't let our agricultural products in. They have a wall. They don't even -- it's not even a tariff; they have a wall. They don't want it. They don't let our agriculture -- and they create, you know, standards that make it impossible because they have standards that -- that -- like, with medical equipment, they created new standards so we can't get our medical equipment -- not that the standards are higher."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: While U.S. farmers do face some trade barriers in selling into the European Union, it is a gross exaggeration to say the EU simply "doesn't let our agricultural products in" or "don't want it." According to the website of Trump's own Department of Agriculture, the U.S. exported $11.6 billion in agricultural products to the European Union in 2016 and $11.5 billion in 2017. The EU ranked fourth for U.S. agricultural exports in 2016 and fifth in 2017.

    Filed under:

    European Union

    Trade

    Farmers

    Trump has repeated this claim 14 times

    "You know, we made a deal with South Korea; nobody talks about it. We made a deal with South Korea. We took the horrible deal that was made by Hillary Clinton where she said 200,000 jobs will be produced -- and she was right -- for South Korea. They were produced for South Korea, not for us. OK?"

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: Clinton did not claim that the trade deal with South Korea would produce 200,000 jobs. Neither did anyone else in the Obama administration. Obama said that deal would "support at least 70,000 American jobs." (It is also probably a stretch to say the deal was "made by Hillary Clinton." George W. Bush's administration negotiated the original version of the deal. When Congress refused to ratify it, it was revised by the Obama administration when Clinton was secretary of state.)

    Filed under:

    Trade

    South Korea

    Jobs

    Trump has repeated this claim 8 times

    "And if they don't shape up, I would withdraw from the WTO. We rarely won a lawsuit except for the last year. You know, in the last year, we're starting to win a lot. You know why? Because they know if we don't, I'm out of there. I'll take them out. We're starting to win lawsuits that we never -- you know that. We never won lawsuits because the courts are stacked. You know they -- it's sad. We have a minority on the courts."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: Trump's claim is comprehensively inaccurate. First, it is false that WTO panels are "stacked": no judge on any of the three-judge WTO panels that adjudicate complaints can be from a country involved in the dispute -- so while the U.S. doesn't have a majority of judges, it also does not have a minority. Further, decisions by those initial panels can be appealed to the WTO's seven-member appeals body -- on which the U.S. has a judge. " The United States, in fact, has always had one of the Appellate Body members with U.S. nationality, which is very unusual, but it is the situation," WTO Director General Roberto Azevedo said in response to an earlier version of this Trump allegation. Second, it is false that the U.S. "never" won WTO cases before Trump came along; as his own Council of Economic Advisers said in a report in February, the U.S. has won 86 per cent of the cases it has brought to WTO adjudicators; the global average is 84 per cent, China's figure 67 per cent. (Other analyses have put the U.S. victory rate as high as 91 per cent). As is standard for the WTO, the U.S. tends to lose cases where a complaint is brought against it -- but even in those cases, Trump's advisers noted that it does better (25 per cent victory rate) than the world average (17 per cent) or China's record (just 5 per cent). Third, trade experts say there is no evidence the U.S. is now doing better at the WTO than it used to. "There is absolutely nothing to the claim that 'we're starting to get much better results,'" Dan Ikenson, director of trade policy at the libertarian Cato Institute, said in response to an earlier version of this claim. "They've been consistent and fair from the outset."

    Filed under:

    Trade

    Trump has repeated this claim 5 times

    "The United States -- look, since the World Trade Organization, which was probably, I called -- I called NAFTA the second-worst trade deal ever made. I would say the WTO was the single worst trade deal ever made."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: Trump has repeatedly called NAFTA the worst trade deal ever made. Until this, he had not called NAFTA the second-worst trade deal ever made.

    Filed under:

    Trade

    Canada

    Mexico

    "The NATO meeting was phenomenal. You know they're putting up hundreds of billions of dollars more, and I came out of that one where they said I was too rough on the other presidents and prime ministers of the countries, so OK, give me a break. But in the meantime we were carrying them on NATO. They weren't paying their bills, or as you would say in your wonderful magazine, they were delinquent. Very delinquent, OK?"

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: NATO countries were not "delinquent" or "not paying their bills" before Trump took office. Trump was referring to the fact that some European countries had not been meeting their pledge to spend 2 per cent of their gross domestic product on defence. But this 2 per cent figure was merely a guideline or target, not an ironclad commitment, and countries' failure to meet it did not result in bills of any kind. (One could argue that Trump was using "delinquent" in a figurative sense, but he has repeatedly suggested that NATO countries owe the U.S. an actual debt, so we believe he is making a literal claim that is false.)

    Filed under:

    NATO

    Military

    Trump has repeated this claim 16 times

    "The NATO meeting was phenomenal. You know they're putting up hundreds of billions of dollars more, and I came out of that one where they said I was too rough on the other presidents and prime ministers of the countries, so OK, give me a break. But in the meantime we were carrying them on NATO. They weren't paying their bills, or as you would say in your wonderful magazine, they were delinquent. Very delinquent, OK?"

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: Contrary to Trump's frequent claims, there is no evidence NATO members agreed at this 2018 summit to spend "hundreds of billions of dollars more" on defence. The countries merely agreed to a declaration in which they reiterated their 2014 commitment to spend 2 per cent of gross domestic product on defence by 2024: "We reaffirm our unwavering commitment to all aspects of the Defence Investment Pledge agreed at the 2014 Wales Summit, and to submit credible national plans on its implementation, including the spending guidelines for 2024." French President Emmanuel Macron explicitly rejected Trump's claim about significant additional commitments: "The communique is clear. It reaffirms a commitment to 2 per cent in 2024. That is all," he said.

    Filed under:

    NATO

    Military

    Trump has repeated this claim 8 times

    "Another thing that happened is with the North Korea -- and -- and if you people remember, if you go back to the end of the Obama administration, we were ready to go to war with North Korea, just so you understand. You know, when people say, 'Oh, what have you done?' We don't feel that now. OK?"

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: There is no evidence Obama was ready to go to war with North Korea or that, as Trump has claimed, he told Trump such a thing; such a remark would be a total departure from Obama's long-held views on North Korea. Obama's office has declined to comment on Trump's previous claims about Obama supposedly making this statement at his post-election meeting with Trump, but Ned Price, a former special assistant to Obama and spokesperson for the National Security Council, called Trump's remark "absolute revisionist history," saying, "I've never heard anything even remotely like that coming up during that session." Obama's strategy of "containment and deterrence" was "predicated in part on the understanding that a military conflict on the (Korean) Peninsula would be nothing short of catastrophic," Price said. In the past, Trump has confirmed what news outlets have reported: Obama told him North Korea was the biggest or most urgent problem he would face, not that war was inevitable.

    Filed under:

    Barack Obama

    North Korea

    Military

    Trump has repeated this claim 6 times

    "China was rebuilt with American dollars. They were taking out $500 billion a year."

    Source: Interview with Bloomberg

    in fact: The U.S. has never once had a $500 billion trade deficit with China, according to U.S. government data. The deficit was $337 billion in 2017, $375 billion if you only count trade in goods and exclude trade in services.

    Filed under:

    China

    Trade

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 57 times

    "What's going on at @CNN is happening, to different degrees, at other networks - with @NBCNews being the worst. The good news is that Andy Lack(y) is about to be fired(?) for incompetence, and much worse. When Lester Holt got caught fudging my tape on Russia, they were hurt badly!"

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: There is no evidence that Lester Holt altered the tape of the famous 2017 interview in which Trump said he had been thinking of the Russia investigation when he fired FBI director James Comey. The whole interview had been available online for 15 months before Trump raised this objection in August 2018. Trump did not provide any substantiation for the assertion.

    Filed under:

    Media

    Russian ties AUG 29, 2018

    (Trump tweeted out an inaccurate video.)

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: Trump tweeted out an inaccurate video. The video purported to show that Google promoted Obama's State of the Union addresses on its search home page but not Trump's own State of the Union Addresses. While Google did not promote Trump's first address to a joint session of Congress, in 2017, this was not regarded an official State of the Union, since he had just taken office; Google also did not promote Obama's first address to a joint session, in 2009. The video also purported to show that Google did not promote Trump's first actual State of the Union, in 2018. In fact, it did do so, in the exact same way it did so for Obama. As the Associated Press reported: "For 2018, several web pages captured by Wayback Machine (internet archive site) show the Google homepage advertising a livestream of Trump's speech with the words: 'Live! Watch President Trump's State of the Union address on YouTube.'"

    Filed under:

    Google

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "'Anonymous Sources are really starting to BURN the media.' @FoxNews The fact is that many anonymous sources don't even exist. They are fiction made up by the Fake News reporters. Look at the lie that Fake CNN is now in. They got caught red handed! Enemy of the People!"

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: There is no evidence that reporters have invented fictional sources for their stories on Trump. (There are, of course, valid questions about the use of anonymous sources. In the CNN case Trump was referring to, Lanny Davis, the lawyer for Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen, served as an anonymous source for a story that said Cohen was prepared to tell investigators that Trump had advance knowledge of a controversial 2016 meeting involving his son and a Russian lawyer -- then Davis later retracted his claims, saying he was unable to confirm it. But even here, CNN did not invent a nonexistent source, merely used an unreliable source.)

    Filed under:

    Media

    Trump has repeated this claim 13 times

    "I think part of the North Korean problem is caused by our trade disputes with China. China has been taking out about $500 billion a year from the United States for many years. And we can't let that happen." And: "But when you're losing four to five hundred billion dollars a year, and it's going to China, and coming away from our country and our taxpayers, I can't let that go on."

    Source: Speech about Drug-Free Communities program

    in fact: The U.S. has never once had a $500 billion trade deficit with China, according to U.S. government data. The deficit was $337 billion in 2017, $375 billion if you only count trade in goods and exclude trade in services.

    Filed under:

    China

    Trade

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 57 times

    "We have put billions and billions of dollars into Puerto Rico. And it was a very tough one. Don't forget, their electric plant was dead before the hurricane. If you look back on your records, you'll see that that plant was dead. It was shut. It was bankrupt. It was out of business. They owed tremendous amounts of money. They had it closed up. And then, when the hurricane came, people said, 'What are we going to do about electricity?' That wasn't really the hurricane; that was done before the hurricane."

    Source: Speech about Drug-Free Communities program

    in fact: While Puerto Rico's power authority was indeed mired in financial problems before the hurricane, and while Puerto Rico's power grid had serious pre-hurricane problems, the island's power plants were not "dead" pre-hurricane; Puerto Ricans had electricity then.

    Filed under:

    Puerto Rico

    Hurricanes

    "And we're doing record business, record stock market, record everything. And also, record unemployment."

    Source: Speech about Drug-Free Communities program

    in fact: U.S. stock markets have indeed hit record highs under Trump. Unemployment has not hit a record low. The unemployment rate at the time Trump spoke was 3.9 per cent; the unemployment rate hit 2.5 per cent in 1953.

    Filed under:

    Jobs

    Economy

    Exaggeration AUG 28, 2018

    "And I guess you figure you would know this better than anybody, but 15 years of declines in terms of farmers. They've had 15 years, straight years, in terms of decline."

    Source: Interview with RFD-TV

    in fact: We've let several versions of this Trump claim slide without correction, but Trump is objectively incorrect when he says farmers have had 15 uninterrupted years of decline. The Congressional Research Service reported in February 2018: "U.S. farm income experienced a golden period during 2011 through 2014 due to strong commodity prices and robust agricultural exports -- in 2014 U.S. agricultural exports achieved a record of $152.3 billion."

    Filed under:

    Farmers

    "I've always said if you'd go from election day, five years back, take soybeans, it's dropped in half. That had nothing to do with me. So it came down."

    Source: Interview with RFD-TV

    in fact: We've let some of Trump's previous claims about an Obama-era drop in soybean prices slide without comment, but in this case he was again inaccurately describing what happened between two specific dates. Between Nov. 8, 2011, five years before election day, and Nov. 8, 2016, soybean prices dropped 16 per cent, from about $12 per bushel to about $10 per bushel, according to historical data from Markets Insider and from Macrotrends.

    Filed under:

    Farmers

    Economy

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 6 times

    "The steel is booming. We're making steel again and I will tell you that prices are going to start to come down because, as an example, U.S. Steel opened up six plants."

    Source: Interview with RFD-TV

    in fact: Though Trump had been making this claim for two months, U.S. Steel had not opened up six plants, and there was still no evidence at the time that U.S. Steel planned to do so. (Trump originally claimed it was six plants, then later claimed it was seven plants, then eight plants.) At the time Trump spoke, U.S. Steel had only announced a major development at two facilities since he introduced his steel tariffs. First it said it was restarting two shuttered blast furnaces at its plant in Granite City, Illinois, then this week that it was investing $750 million to revitalize a plant in Gary, Indiana.

    Filed under:

    Tariffs

    Steel

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "Our steel industry was dead. It was going to go out of existence..."

    Source: Interview with RFD-TV

    in fact: The U.S. steel industry was not "dead" or nearing extinction before Trump imposed his tariffs, though it certainly had challenges and was obviously far smaller than it was in the heyday of traditional integrated steel mills. The American Iron and Steel Institute said then: "The steel industry directly employs around 140,000 people in the United States, and it directly or indirectly supports almost one million U.S. jobs."

    Filed under:

    Trade

    Economy

    Steel

    Tariffs

    Trump has repeated this claim 7 times

    "Hillary Clinton's Emails, many of which are Classified Information, got hacked by China. Next move better be by the FBI & DOJ or, after all of their other missteps (Comey, McCabe, Strzok, Page, Ohr, FISA, Dirty Dossier etc.), their credibility will be forever gone!"

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: There was no evidence for the president's claim, and the FBI took the rare step of publicly rejecting it. As the Washington Post reported: "Asked about the president's assertions, the FBI provided a statement Wednesday afternoon that simply said: 'The FBI has not found any evidence the servers were compromised.'"

    Filed under:

    China

    Election

    US intelligence

    Hillary Clinton

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "Report just out: 'China hacked Hillary Clinton's private Email Server.' Are they sure it wasn't Russia (just kidding!)? What are the odds that the FBI and DOJ are right on top of this? Actually, a very big story. Much classified information!"

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: There was no evidence for the president's claim, and the FBI took the rare step of publicly rejecting it. As the Washington Post reported: "Asked about the president's assertions, the FBI provided a statement Wednesday afternoon that simply said: 'The FBI has not found any evidence the servers were compromised.'"

    Filed under:

    China

    Election

    US intelligence

    Hillary Clinton

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "Google search results for 'Trump News' shows only the viewing/reporting of Fake News Media. In other words, they have it RIGGED, for me & others, so that almost all stories & news is BAD. Fake CNN is prominent. Republican/Conservative & Fair Media is shut out. Illegal? 96% of results on 'Trump News' are from National Left-Wing Media, very dangerous. Google & others are suppressing voices of Conservatives and hiding information and news that is good. They are controlling what we can & cannot see. This is a very serious situation-will be addressed!"

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: There was no evidence that Google was rigging search results to promote anti-Trump outlets or suppress pro-Trump outlets. The "96 per cent" figure was based on an informal analysis by a right-wing writer on PJMedia.com, who autioned it was "not scientific." And the methodology was questionable at best: among the entities it classified as left-wing were the majority of the country's most prominent news outlets, which would pop up, for obvious reasons, in a search for news. Outlets identified as left-wing included the Reuters wire service to which Trump had just given an interview; the business channel CNBC, to which he had also given a recent interview; ABC, NBC and CBS; and the Associated Press.

    Filed under:

    Google

    "I smile at Senators and others talking about how good free trade is for the U.S. What they don't say is that we lose Jobs and over 800 Billion Dollars a year on really dumb Trade Deals...."

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: The U.S. has never had an $800 billion overall trade deficit, and the 2017 deficit was $566 billion. There is some basis for Trump's claim: the 2017 deficit was $810 billion if you count only trade in goods and do not count trade in services. But Trump, as usual, did not say he was doing so.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Trade

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 34 times AUG 27, 2018

    "Now one of the things I'm most proud of is getting rid of the Johnson Amendment. That was a disaster for you."

    Source: Speech at White House dinner for evangelical leaders

    in fact: As Trump's audience of evangelical leaders knew, he has not gotten rid of the Johnson Amendment, which prohibits churches from endorsing or opposing political candidates. His 2017 executive order merely says the Treasury Department will, "to the extent permitted by law," not impose a tax penalty on a person or religious organization who "speaks or has spoken about moral or political issues from a religious perspective." The government almost never imposed such penalties even before the order, and such a directive is far from complete repeal. "Trump's Religious Liberty Order Doesn't Answer Most Evangelicals' Prayers; Prayer breakfast pledge to 'totally destroy' Johnson Amendment comes up shy," read the headline on the website Christianity Today.

    Filed under:

    Religion

    Promises

    Trump has repeated this claim 5 times

    "And women's unemployment recently achieved its lowest rate in 65 years."

    Source: Speech at White House dinner for evangelical leaders

    in fact: This claim was no longer true at the time Trump spoke. It was true as of two months prior: the women's unemployment rate for May, reported in June, was 3.6 per cent, the same as in 1953, 65 years ago. But it was up to 3.9 per cent in July, not even as low as the 3.8 per cent of December 2000, just 18 years prior.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 22 times

    "We're restoring opportunity for all Americans. African-American, Hispanic American, Asian-American unemployment have all recently achieved their lowest rates ever recorded in the history of our country."

    Source: Speech at White House dinner for evangelical leaders

    in fact: Trump was correct on the first two, incorrect on the last one. While the unemployment rates for African-Americans and for Hispanics are at all-time lows, at least since the government started to release this data in the early 1970s, the rate for Asian-Americans is not. The Asian-American rate briefly dropped to a low, 2.0 per cent, in May. (A low, at least, since the government began issuing Asian-American data in 2000.) But the most recent rate at the time Trump spoke, for July, was 3.1 per cent. This was higher than the rate in Obama's last two full months in office -- 3 per cent in November 2016 and 2.8 per cent in December 2016 -- and in multiple months of George W. Bush's second term.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Jobs

    Race relations

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "Today we reached the highest level in the history of the stock market. We broke 26,000 -- so I assume you have some stock."

    Source: Speech at White House dinner for evangelical leaders

    in fact: This was not the highest level in the history of the stock market. While the Dow Jones Industrial Average did break the 26,000-point barrier that day, closing at 26,049.64, its peak was much higher: it closed at 26,616.71 on January 26, 2018.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Exaggeration

    "Well, you are here on a very special day because the stock market is up almost 300 points today. We just signed a trade agreement with Mexico, and it's a terrific agreement for everybody. It's been in the works for a long time. It's an agreement that a lot of people said couldn't be done, and we did something, and it was very special. Great for our farmers, our workers. And our stock market just broke 26,000 for the first time ever in the history."

    Source: Remarks at meeting with Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta

    in fact: Trump's first claim about the stock market -- "up almost 300 points today' -- was correct, and the Dow Jones Industrial Average finished the day up 259.29 points. But Trump's second claim was incorrect: this was not the first time in history the Dow had broken 26,000 points. The first time was on January 16, 2018, nine months prior.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Exaggeration

    "We're starting negotiations with Canada, pretty much immediately. I can't tell you where those negotiations are gone (sic). It's going to be a -- it's a smaller segment, as you know. Mexico is a very large trading partner."

    Source: Remarks on trade deal with Mexico

    in fact: U.S. trade with Canada is larger, not smaller, than U.S. trade with Mexico. In 2017, according to the website of the U.S. Trade Representative, "U.S. goods and services trade with Mexico totaled an estimated $615.9 billion," while "U.S. goods and services trade with Canada totaled an estimated $673.1 billion."

    Filed under:

    Canada

    Mexico

    Trade

    "This is one of the largest trade deals ever made. Maybe the largest trade deal ever made.

    Source: Remarks on trade deal with Mexico

    in fact: The preliminary trade deal the U.S. struck with Mexico is not even close to the largest trade deal ever made. It is, obviously, not even close to the size of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Trump abandoned -- which would have included not only the U.S., Canada and Mexico but nine other Pacific countries. With the U.S. involved, TPP would have covered 40 per cent of global economic production.

    Filed under:

    Trade

    Mexico AUG 26, 2018

    "Over 90% approval rating for your all time favorite (I hope) President within the Republican Party and 52% overall. This despite all of the made up stories by the Fake News Media trying endlessly to make me look as bad and evil as possible."

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: Trump did not have a 52 per cent approval rating in any poll at the time. Even the pollster he has cited most frequently, Republican-leaning Rasmussen, had him at 46 per cent approval at the time. The RealClearPolitics average had him at 43.6 per cent, the FiveThirtyEight average had him at 41.9 per cent. The last time he was at 52 per cent in Rasmussen was on March 6, 2017, 17 months prior.

    Filed under:

    Polls

    "'Mainstream Media tries to rewrite history to credit Obama for Trump accomplishments. Since President Trump took office, the economy is booming. The stronger the economy gets, the more desperate his critics are. O had weakest recovery since Great Depression.' @WashTimes"

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: This is an unusual kind of error by Trump: rather than making a false statement himself, he carelessly combined four quotes from various spots in two media reports into one quote he attributed to a single publication, Washington Times. He was correct that an articlein the Washington Times said, "Since President Trump took office, the economy is booming." But the other quotes in Trump's tweet originated in an Investor's Business Daily article that this Washington Times article was itself quoting. For example, the Investor's Business Daily article said: "The stronger the economy gets under President Trump, the more desperate his critics are to hand credit over to Obama." The headline of that article was: "Economic Boom: Media Rewrite History To Credit Obama Instead Of Trump." We know Trump isn't a journalist, so we try to give him some leeway in his use of quotation marks, but this one was inaccurate.

    Filed under:

    Barack Obama

    Economy

    Media AUG 24, 2018

    "Social Media Giants are silencing millions of people. Can't do this even if it means we must continue to hear Fake News like CNN, whose ratings have suffered gravely. People have to figure out what is real, and what is not, without censorship!"

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: Trump provided no evidence that big social media companies are "silencing millions of people" in any way that could be considered political censorship. While Twitter has recently suspended millions of accounts -- 70 million in May and June alone, according to the Washington Post -- it was targeting automated "bots" and fake accounts, not humans. It has individually banned a small number of political figures, such as Milo Yiannopoulos, who were involved in racist harassment or other abusive behaviour, and it has banned Alex Jones, the notorious peddler of conspiracies, but there is no evidence that bans like this number in the "millions."

    Filed under:

    Media

    "...Russian collusion by Dems - and so much more."

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: The claim that Clinton or Democrats more broadly colluded with Russia is simple nonsense: the word "collusion" -- in common language, a "secret agreement or co-operation especially for an illegal or deceitful purpose" -- just does not apply to Democrats' Russia-related activities. The accusation is based on the fact that the British ex-spy who produced a research dossier on the Trump campaign's alleged links to Russia, which was funded in part by Clinton's campaign, used Russian sources in compiling his information. That does not come close to meeting the definition of "collusion."

    Filed under:

    Democrats

    Russian ties

    Trump has repeated this claim 26 times

    "Remember when I first started -- I hate to bring it up now, in this heat, but I used to say, we're going to saying 'Christmas' again. You know, they're saying 'Christmas' again now, right? Remember, at the beginning of my campaign, it was December, and I'd see these stores and they never said 'Merry Christmas.' They're all saying 'Merry Christmas' now. They're proud of it."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: There is no evidence that big department stores and other businesses that said Happy Holidays before Trump's presidency are now saying Merry Christmas. Even Trump's own family members continue to say "Happy Holidays": daughter and aide Ivanka Trump and son Eric Trump both used that phrase instead of "Merry Christmas" on Twitter in December 2017.

    Filed under:

    Religion

    Trump has repeated this claim 4 times

    "Republicans are rebuilding our country. We believe in the dignity of work, the power of freedom, and we believe in the truth of our national motto, which a lot of people don't like using. Did you see some court ruled against it the other day? 'In God we trust.'"

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: There have been no recent rulings against the official use of the motto "In God We Trust," according to both a group that opposes such use and a group that supports it. Andrew Seidel, attorney and director of strategic response at the Freedom from Religion Foundation, said, "There haven't been any decisions recently that have come down that way." Ryan Colby, media associate at Becket, a nonprofit fighting for "religious liberty," said, "The Sixth Circuit ruled in favor of 'In God We Trust' in late May. I believe that is the latest ruling. There is a similar case at the Eighth Circuit but no ruling yet." Just days after Colby's email, the Eighth Circuit ruled in favour of In God We Trust.

    Filed under:

    Religion

    Courts

    "We passed a landmark V.A. accountability law where we can actually fire people if they're bad to our great veterans. And as I've said, we also passed Veterans Choice, something they've been trying to get for 45 years, Veterans Choice. And I'm so proud of that one. And the Senate came through, and the House came through, and it wasn't easy, but we now have a plan. You know, the veterans, these are the greatest people. And they go to a doctor. They're not feeling well, something's wrong. They'd wait in line for 14 days, and literally, not call in and say, 'Come back in two weeks.' You'd be waiting 14 days, 21 days, 32 days, and they'd be waiting in line. And some of them had a small ailment, and it would be terminal by the time they go to see a doctor. It was so bad. It was horrible. And I used to say, I said -- you know I said, 'It's really -- oh, I had something so smart.' I said, 'Listen, I have an idea. If they have to wait that long, why don't we send them to a doctor around the corner?' And everyone said, 'Sir, we've trying to get that approved for 40 years.' But I'm good at getting things approved. We're pretty good at that, right, and we got it approved. So we now have Veterans Choice. They can go out and see a doctor if they have to wait. We'll pay the bill, and we'll save a lot of money. We're going to save a lot of lives. And we're making the quality of life better, a lot better. And we're giving our brave war fighters the tools, resources, and equipment they need to defeat any enemy that dares to threaten our people."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: It was not Trump's idea to let veterans see private doctors when they face long waits at veterans' hospitals, nor was he the first to get such a plan passed in 40 years. Obama signed the Choice program into law in 2014. The bill Trump signed in 2018 simply altered the existing program.

    Filed under:

    Health care

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "To build a highway in this country would take 17, 18, 20 and even 21 years to get approved. And then the highway was no good and it would end up costing like 25 times more than they originally thought. We've got it down to about two years and what I want to do is get it down to one year."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: While some controversial and complicated infrastructure projects may have taken 17, 18, 20 or 21 years to get approved, there is no basis for Trump's suggestion that this time frame was standard. The Treasury Department reported under Obama: "Studies conducted for the Federal Highway Administration concluded that the average time to complete a NEPA (environmental) study increased from 2.2 years in the 1970s, to 4.4 years in the 1980s, to 5.1 years in the 1995 to 2001 period, to 6.6 years in 2011." Further, there is no current evidence that Trump has already succeeded in reducing the standard approval time frame to two years, although he says this is his intention. His Department of Transportation reported a median approval time of 3 years, 10 months in 2017.

    Filed under:

    Infrastructure

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 7 times

    "One of the things that we've done in addition to the biggest tax cuts is we've eliminated the largest number of job-killing regulations of any president, even if they're there for four years, eight years, almost 16 years. We -- we set the record already and we have a lot to go."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: No president has served for "almost 16 years." The longest-serving president, Franklin D. Roosevelt, served just over 12 years, dying shortly into his fourth term. This wasn't a one-time informal remark; it was the 10th time he had suggested that a president served for 16 years.

    Filed under:

    Past presidents

    Trump has repeated this claim 11 times

    "Nucor has just announced an $85 million upgrade in Marion. By the way, I hate to say this, they're doing $750 million in Florida -- but we won't mention that tonight. They'll be doing it here soon, too, because they love this state."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: Nucor announced in March that it would invest $240 million in a steel rebar mill in Florida. It has not announced an investment of $750 million. We will update this item if additional evidence emerges; the company did not respond to a request for comment on Trump's claim.

    Filed under:

    Steel

    Tariffs

    Economy

    "You know, they kept saying I had a problem with the women's vote; I get 52 per cent in the election. I did OK. I did OK."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: Trump won a majority of white women, according to 2016 exit polls, not a majority of all women, as he was claiming here. Exit polls found that had the support of 52 per cent of white women but 42 per cent of all women.

    Filed under:

    Election

    Polls

    Race relations

    Trump has repeated this claim 5 times

    "Women didn't do quite as well. With women, I'm sorry to tell you women, I'm sorry Mrs. Portman. I hate to say this, women's unemployment has just reached a level which is the lowest in only 65 years. So we're not doing as well." And: "So we reached the lowest level in 65 years and in a very short period of time that will be a historic level, too, like the others."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: This claim was no longer almost-true at the time Trump spoke. It was close to true as of two months prior: the women's unemployment rate for May, reported in June, was 3.6 per cent, the same as in 1953, 65 years ago. But it was up to 3.9 per cent in July, not even as low as the 3.8 per cent of December 2000, just 18 years prior.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 22 times

    "African-Americans, you've heard me say this, the unemployment rate recently achieved the lowest level in recorded history. Along with Hispanic and Asian, lowest levels in recorded history."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: Trump was correct on the first two, incorrect on the last one. While the unemployment rates for African-Americans and for Hispanics are at all-time lows, at least since the government started to release this data in the early 1970s, the rate for Asian-Americans is not. The Asian-American rate briefly dropped to a low, 2.0 per cent, in May. But the most recent rate at the time Trump spoke, for July, was 3.1 per cent. This was higher than the rate in Obama's last two full months in office -- 3 per cent in November 2016 and 2.8 per cent in December 2016 -- and in multiple months of George W. Bush's second term.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Jobs

    Race relations

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times

    "But our farmers -- if you look at soybean prices, go five years before our great election in '16, go five years before, go five years back, soy beans went down by 50 per cent on election night. They were down by 50 per cent from what they were five years before."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: We've let some of Trump's previous claims about an Obama-era drop in soybean prices slide without comment, but in this case he is inaccurately describing what happened between two specific dates. Between Nov. 8, 2011, five years before election day, and Nov. 8, 2016, soybean prices dropped 16 per cent, from about $12 per bushel to about $10 per bushel, according to historical data from Markets Insider and from Macrotrends.

    Filed under:

    Farmers

    Exaggeration

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 6 times

    "Did you see where soybeans now is slightly higher than when I started -- you know, everybody was saying, 'Oh, that's the end' -- soybeans are going up. Even I said how did that happen? That's like a great -- how good is that?"

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: This is false whether "when I started" means when he started being president or started his trade war with China. As the president of the American Soybean Association noted, soybean prices have fallen "by about $2.00 per bushel, or 20 per cent, since events leading to the current tariff war with China began impacting markets in June" -- from over $10 per bushel to under $9 per bushel. The decline is about the same from Trump's inauguration to the present. Trump was possibly referring to a recent rebound in the price from its lowest point during the trade war period, but the rebound has not brought the price anywhere close to where it was when he "started."

    Filed under:

    Farmers

    Tariffs

    Trade

    "Do you know how many car companies are now coming back to Ohio and Michigan and Pennsylvania? They're coming back. Companies that left, they're coming back."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: Car companies have made investments in Ohio and Michigan plants since Trump's election, though they have also laid off workers there. But there have seen no announcements about any car company moving back to Pennsylvania. We will update this item if evidence emerges.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "Since the election, we've created nearly 4 million new jobs, an unthinkable number."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: It is not true that nobody would have believed 3.9 million jobs could be added over this 20-month period. In the previous 20-month period, under Obama, 4.3 million jobs were added.

    Filed under:

    Jobs

    Economy

    Trump has repeated this claim 24 times

    "We had a Republican -- Dov Hikind of New York, he's a very strong Democrat, probably never uttered the word Republican in his life. And he was on television saying what the president of the United States did was incredible." And: "And I'll tell you, he got on television and he said great things. I actually think he would vote for me. And I'll tell you, he would never vote for a Republican. It was never in his -- but what he said was great."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: Hikind, a Democrat who represents a Brooklyn district in the New York state assembly, endorsed Republican George W. Bush in the 2004 election, Republican John McCain in the 2008 election, and Republican Mitt Romney in the 2012 election. He said he could not support Trump in the 2016 election, citing Trump's behaviour and lack of knowledge of policy, but said he would write in Republican Paul Ryan.

    Filed under:

    Democrats

    Immigration

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "The new platform of Democrat Party is to abolish ICE. They want to abolish the agency that is removing violent predators, drug dealers, murderers, MS-3 (sic) monster gang members and even just recently a Nazi criminal who nobody could get out for 40 years."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: "Forty years" is an exaggeration. The Nazi in question, Jakiw Palij, "was first tracked down by investigators in 1993," the New York Times reported, so efforts to deport him from the U.S. lasted a maximum of 25 years.

    Filed under:

    Immigration

    "The new platform of Democrat Party is to abolish ICE."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: This is an exaggeration. There is new Democratic momentum behind the movement to abolish Immigration and Customs Enforcement, but that is not the position of "the Democrat Party" as a whole. While a smattering of Democratic House members and two prominent senators, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Elizabeth Warren, have joined the call for abolition at the time Trump spoke, the party's leadership remains opposed to the proposal. Democratic Senate Leader Chuck Schumer told reporters: "Look, ICE does some functions that are very much needed. "Reform ICE? Yes. That's what I think we should do. It needs reform." Democratic House Leader Nancy Pelosi, through a spokesperson, has called for a "drastic overhaul of its immigration functions," but has not endorsed abolition.

    Filed under:

    Democrats

    Immigration

    Trump has repeated this claim 6 times

    "We have in New York a governor -- Governor Cuomo -- sues everybody. You know, you go into that state, you get sued; that's why people don't want to move in. For that and the fact that it's the highest taxes. But if you go to New York, you get sued, and people are afraid to go to New York. They don't want to go."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: We have no idea what Trump is referring to. It is obviously not true that "if you go to New York, you get sued."

    Filed under:

    Democrats

    "There was a poll today -- they put it up -- that all of the candidates put together can't beat Trump in the election of 2020. I think they felt good about that; do you think they like that poll? I think so. I actually put it up on my Twitter because I thought they'd love to see it. We'll send it to a lot of people."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: There was no poll at all. The article Trump posted on his Twitter was about gambling: a website called BetOnline.ag reporting that more gamblers were betting on Trump to win in 2020 than on all other potential candidates combined.

    Filed under:

    2020 election

    Polls

    "He (Sherrod Brown) voted no on Neil Gorsuch. How do you do that? First in his class at Harvard, first in his class at Oxford -- 'I'll take a no vote.'"

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: We do not know if Gorsuch even had an official ranking at Oxford -- he got his PhD there -- but he was not first in his class at Harvard, where he attended law school. More than 10 per cent of Gorsuch's class graduated summa cum laude, according to a Harvard spokesperson; Gorsuch, who graduated at one level lower, cum laude, was not one of them.

    Filed under:

    Courts

    Exaggeration

    Trump has repeated this claim 3 times

    "I'll tell you, fellows, if you don't win that (Ohio governor) race, I will be so disappointed. I will say you should never run again. Get them to get the information on the building, OK, the building that he (Richard Cordray) bought, where they spent $250 million buying a building that was worth the fraction of that. But call my office, I have so much information. That was a bad guy." And: "So you're going to be sent some information on the $250 million, the federal money. I'm sending it to you."

    Source: Speech to the Ohio Republican Party

    in fact: Trump had his details wrong. Cordray, the Democratic candidate for Ohio governor, was formerly the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Republicans in Congress have criticized him for a costly renovation of the CFPB's office building, not for buying a new building. Republicans said the renovation cost $145 million, not $250 million; $145 million is the figure news outlets including the Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg have used in the last year.

    Filed under:

    Democrats

    "It's said now that our economy is the strongest it's ever been in the history of our country, and you just have to take a look at the numbers. Unemployment: all-time historic lows. Black unemployment, Hispanic unemployment, Asian unemployment, women unemployment. These are records that are being set on a weekly basis."

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: Trump was correct on the first two, incorrect on the last two. While the unemployment rates for African-Americans and for Hispanics are at all-time lows, at least since the government started to release this data in the early 1970s, the rate for Asian-Americans and women is not. The Asian-American rate briefly dropped to a low, 2.0 per cent, in May. But the most recent rate at the time Trump spoke, for July, was 3.1 per cent. This was higher than the rate in Obama's last two full months in office -- 3 per cent in November 2016 and 2.8 per cent in December 2016 -- and in multiple months of George W. Bush's second term. The women's unemployment rate for May, reported in June, was 3.6 per cent, the same as in 1953, 65 years ago. But it was up to 3.9 per cent in July, not even as low as the 3.8 per cent of December 2000, just 18 years prior.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Jobs

    Race relations

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times AUG 23, 2018

    "Because of our incredible achievements, other nations seek to steal, copy, or control American intellectual property. And we had very, very little safeguards up. We had, in many cases, I would say, Marco (Rubio), no safeguards. And now we have probably the best there is in the world."

    Source: Remarks at roundtable on the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act

    in fact: This is an exaggeration on both ends: it is not true that the U.S. had "no safeguards" against intellectual property theft before Trump, nor that the safeguards have dramatically improved under Trump. "His claim is false. We had robust IP protections prior to his presidency and very little has changed during his presidency," said Denver lawyer Zoe Argento, who works in the field and formerly taught about intellectual at Roger Williams University School of Law. Sean Pager, professor and associate director of the intellectual property program at Michigan State University, said Trump's claim about the past is "almost certainly hyperbole"; regarding Trump's claim about the present, Pager said, "'Probably the best in the world' is not something I can evaluate, but count me dubious."

    Filed under:

    Economy

    "So we've had tremendous success. And just to finish, NATO -- I raised hundreds of billions of dollars from these countries that weren't paying. They were delinquent, they weren't paying their bills."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: NATO countries were not "delinquent" or "not paying their bills" before Trump took office. Trump was referring to the fact that some European countries had not been meeting their pledge to spend 2 per cent of their gross domestic product on defence. But this 2 per cent figure was merely a guideline or target, not an ironclad commitment, and countries' failure to meet it did not result in bills of any kind. (One could argue that Trump was using "delinquent" in a figurative sense, but he has repeatedly suggested that NATO countries owe the U.S. an actual debt, so we believe he is making a literal claim that is false.) In addition, "hundreds of billions of dollars" appears to be an exaggeration. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said in July "In fact, since President Trump took office, European allies and Canada have added an additional $41 billion to their defence spending."

    Filed under:

    NATO

    Military

    Trump has repeated this claim 16 times

    "And I'll never forget -- you talk about the fake news -- they said, 'Donald Trump met' -- the first day it was incredible. Nobody could believe I was able to do it. Obama couldn't get a meeting. Clinton couldn't get a meeting. Bush couldn't get a meeting, with the family. Bush couldn't get a meeting. Nobody could get a meeting. And this one's tougher than the father. I say that with respect, but he's tougher than the father and tougher than the grandfather. They couldn't even get a meeting. I got a meeting."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: There is no evidence that Obama or his predecessors ever desired a meeting with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il or successor Kim Jong Un, much less that the North Koreans rejected such a meeting. Ned Price, a former special assistant to Obama and National Security Council spokesperson, said the claim is false. He wrote in an email: "President Trump lives in a fantasy world in which only he can do certain things -- it goes back to his campaign phrase: 'Only I can fix it.' But the truth is that there are certain things that only President Trump would do. And rushing to meet with his North Korean counterpart counts among them. To be clear: the previous administration never sought a meeting between Obama and Kim Jong-un or his father. It's not that such a meeting would have been off the table; had the North Koreans demonstrated a genuine willingness to denuclearize, backed up by concrete moves, such a meeting could have materialized over time. But the North Koreans didn't demonstrate that then, nor have they demonstrated that now. This claim is nothing more than Trump's deep inferiority complex once again rearing its head."

    Filed under:

    Barack Obama

    North Korea

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "When I took over, President Obama thought we'd have to go to war with North Korea, and I asked him, 'Did you ever speak to Kim Jong Un?' 'No.' I said, 'Wouldn't it be maybe a good thing to give it a shot?'"

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: There is no evidence Obama told Trump or suggested to Trump anything that would suggest the U.S. would have to go to war with North Korea; such a remark would be a total departure from Obama's long-held views on North Korea. Obama's office declined to comment, but Ned Price, a former special assistant to Obama and spokesperson for the National Security Council, called Trump's remark "absolute revisionist history," saying, "I've never heard anything even remotely like that coming up during that session." Obama's strategy of "containment and deterrence" was "predicated in part on the understanding that a military conflict on the (Korean) Peninsula would be nothing short of catastrophic," Price said. In the past, Trump has confirmed what news outlets have reported: Obama told him North Korea was the biggest or most urgent problem he would face, not that war was inevitable.

    Filed under:

    Barack Obama

    North Korea

    Military

    Trump has repeated this claim 6 times

    "I get along great with President Xi -- but I said, 'We can no longer give you $500 billion a year on bad trade deals.'" And: "But last year China made 500 and sev -- we had a deficit with China, $517 billion. Not gonna happen anymore."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: The U.S. has never once had a $500 billion trade deficit with China, according to U.S. government data. The deficit was $337 billion in 2017, $375 billion if you only count trade in goods and exclude trade in services.

    Filed under:

    China

    Trade

    Exaggeration

    "What we're doing for health care is incredible. We're even keeping the remnants of Obamacare. You know, we've mostly got it killed."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: Trump has weakened Obamacare in several ways, most notably by eliminating the "individual mandate" that required people to obtain health insurance, but the law is far from dead. Trump did not eliminate Obamacare's expansion of the Medicaid insurance program for low-income people, the federal and state Obamacare marketplaces that allow other uninsured people to buy insurance, or the subsidies that help many of them make the purchases. Nor did he touch various Obamacare rules for the insurance market, like its prohibition on insurers denying coverage to people with pre-existing conditions.

    Filed under:

    Health care

    Taxes

    Trump has repeated this claim 13 times

    "Dov Hikind, who's a very Democrat assemblyman from New York, heavy Democrat. I mean, this is a guy that never heard of a Republican, OK? He was giving me such praise."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: Hikind, a Democrat who represents a Brooklyn district in the New York state assembly, endorsed Republican George W. Bush in the 2004 election, Republican John McCain in the 2008 election, and Republican Mitt Romney in the 2012 election. He said he could not support Trump in the 2016 election, citing Trump's behaviour and lack of knowledge of policy, but said he would write in Republican Paul Ryan.

    Filed under:

    Democrats

    Immigration

    Trump has repeated this claim 2 times

    "We're building the wall. It's already started...The wall is going up, a lot of people don't know it. I'd like to build it even faster, but dealing with the Democrats is very tough."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: Construction on Trump's border wall has not started, and the U.S. has not spent $3.2 billion. When Trump has claimed in the past that wall construction has begun, he has appeared to be referring to a project in which a 2.25-mile stretch of existing wall in California is being replaced by a taller wall. That project was proposed in 2009, and the Los Angeles Times reported that Border Patrol spokesperson Jonathan Pacheco told reporters in March: "First and foremost, this isn't Trump's wall. This isn't the infrastructure that Trump is trying to bring in. ... This new wall replacement has absolutely nothing to do with the prototypes that were shown over in the San Diego area." The $1.6 billion Congress allocated to border projects in 2018 is not for the type of giant concrete wall Trump has proposed: spending on that kind of wall is expressly prohibited in the legislation, and much of the congressional allocation is for replacement and reinforcement projects rather than new construction. Trump has requested another $1.6 billion for the 2019 fiscal year, but this has not yet been approved, much less spent.

    Filed under:

    Immigration

    Trump has repeated this claim 27 times

    "And how about with Manafort they raided his home at like 5:00 in the morning I think, on a weekend and his wife is in bed and they go in with guns? This isn't Al Capone."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: Manafort's home was raided by the FBI on Wednesday, July 26, 2017, not a weekend.

    Filed under:

    Robert Mueller

    Russian ties

    "But I'll tell you there's somebody made a better deal -- Awan, the IT guy for Schultz, Congresswoman Schultz. He had all the information on the Democrats, he had all the information on everybody. He went to jail holding the hands of the Justice Department and the FBI. They sat there together, they were smiling and laughing. And he got nothing. And he stole money. And he had more information on corruption of the Democrats than anybody. And they don't even have his computers and his servers. They just gave him -- you saw that, it was on your show -- they gave him nothing. Nothing." And: "I mean, he was worse than anybody, in my opinion. He got nothing. He's a Democrat, he got nothing. The reason he got nothing, because the Dems are very strong in the Justice Department."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: There is no basis for Trump's claims about Imran Awan, a former information technology employee for Democrats in the House of Representatives. Awan, a Pakistani-American who obtained U.S. citizenship in 2004, pleaded guilty in 2018 to making false statements on a bank loan application. But in that plea deal, the federal government issued a lengthy statement making clear that the Trump-promoted conspiracy theories about Awan and computer servers were baseless. Prosecutors wrote that they had conducted a "thorough" investigation, which included interviews with about 40 witnesses and an examination of computers and devices, and "uncovered no evidence that your client violated federal law with respect to the House computer systems. Particularly, the government has found no evidence that your client illegally removed House data from the House network or from House members' offices, stole the House Democratic Caucus server, stole or destroyed House information technology equipment, or improperly accessed or transferred government information, including classified or sensitive information."

    Filed under:

    Democrats

    Trump has repeated this claim 5 times

    "...He (Michael Cohen) was in another business totally unrelated to me, where I guess there was fraud involved and loans and taxicabs and all sorts of things -- nothing to do with me -- because he had an outside business. He worked for me, you could really say was more or less part time."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: Cohen was executive vice-president and special counsel to Trump at the Trump Organization, Trump's company. While Cohen also pursued his own business interests, claiming he worked "more or less part time" for Trump is a stretch.

    Filed under:

    Michael Cohen

    "If you look at President Obama, he had a massive campaign violation but he had a different attorney general. And they viewed it a lot differently. You know, we have somebody that they seem to like to go after a lot of Republicans. But he settled his very easily. In fact, I put that out fairly recently. So Obama had it. Other people have it, almost everybody that runs for office has campaign violations."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: There is no basis for Trump's suggestion that bias on the part of the attorney general was the reason Obama campaign finance violations were treated differently than the ones to which Michael Cohen pleaded guilty. As numerous news outlets have explained, Obama's 2008 campaign paid a $375,000 Federal Election Commission fine for failing to report the identities of big donors who donated in the final weeks of the campaign and for failing to quickly enough return $1.3 million in donations that were above the legal maximum. But these issues were considered errors, not deliberate acts; Trump's 2016 campaign was accused by the Federal Election Commission of 1,100 errors involving donations, of the exact same amount the Obama donation errors involved, $1.3 million, and was not charged with crimes for those. Further, Obama himself was not alleged to be involved in any way in his campaign's issues. Cohen, Trump's former lawyer, pleaded guilty to personal involvement in illegal payments, and he alleged that Trump directed him to make the payments.

    Filed under:

    Michael Cohen

    Barack Obama

    Election

    "And by the way, he (Michael Cohen) pled to two counts that aren't a crime, which nobody understands. I watched a number of shows -- sometimes you get some pretty good information by watching shows. Those two counts aren't even a crime. They weren't campaign finance...But you have to understand, Ainsley, what he did -- and they weren't taken out of campaign finance. That's a big thing, that's a much bigger thing. Did they come out of the campaign? They didn't come out of the campaign. They came from me and I tweeted about it. You know, I put -- I don't know if you know but I tweeted about the payments -- but they didn't come out of campaign. In fact, my first question when I heard about it was, 'Did they come out of the campaign?' because that could be a little dicey. And they didn't come out of the campaign. And that's big. But they weren't, that's not, it's not even a campaign violation."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: This is nonsensical. Cohen's crimes are crimes; there are numerous campaign finance crimes that do not involve expenditures of campaign funds. Cohen pleaded guilty to two campaign finance crimes related to payments to women who allege that Trump had sexual relations with them while he was married.

    Filed under:

    Michael Cohen

    Election

    Trump has repeated this claim 3 times

    "Black unemployment, Asian unemployment, women unemployment, Hispanic unemployment -- historic lows. It's been an amazing thing. And, you know, unfortunately the media never covers that. They don't like to cover that kind of thing. They like to cover nonsense."

    Source: Interview on Fox and Friends

    in fact: While the unemployment rates for African-Americans and for Hispanics are at all-time lows, at least since the government started to release this data in the early 1970s, the rate for Asian-Americans is not. The Asian-American rate briefly dropped to a low, 2.0 per cent, in May. But the most recent rate at the time Trump spoke, for July, was 3.1 per cent. This was higher than the rate in Obama's last two full months in office -- 3 per cent in November 2016 and 2.8 per cent in December 2016 -- and in multiple months of George W. Bush's second term.

    Filed under:

    Economy

    Jobs

    Race relations

    Trump has repeated this claim 20 times AUG 22, 2018

    "I have asked Secretary of State @SecPompeo to closely study the South Africa land and farm seizures and expropriations and the large scale killing of farmers. 'South African Government is now seizing land from white farmers.' @TuckerCarlson @FoxNews "

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: As numerous media outlets have noted, there is no "large scale killing of farmers" in South Africa. AgriSA, a South African agricultural industry group, said there were 47 people killed on farms in the 2017-2018 tracking year, a 19-year low, and there was no evidence that farmers were targeting en masse because they were farmers. There are more than 17,000 total murders per year in South Africa.

    Filed under:

    Africa

    "Michael Cohen plead guilty to two counts of campaign finance violations that are not a crime."

    Source: Twitter

    in fact: Cohen pleaded guilty to willfully causing an unlawful corporate campaign contribution and to making an excessive campaign contribution. These are crimes.

    Filed under:

    Michael Cohen

    Trump has repeated this claim 3 times AUG 21, 2018

    "We have MS-13 on the run. They poured in here with Obama."

    Source: Campaign rally in Charleston, West Virginia

    in fact: As the Associated Press reported: "There's no evidence that MS-13 gangs 'poured in' during the Obama administration. The Justice Department has said there are about 10,000 MS-13 members in the U.S., the same number as more than a decade ago."

    Filed under:

    Barack Obama

    Immigration

    Crime

    MS-13

    "We've secured a record $700 billion for our military this year and $716 billion for next year, billion with a B."

    Source: Campaign rally in Charleston, West Virginia

    in fact: Neither of these military budgets was a record, even if you ignore inflation. Obama signed a $725 billion version of the same bill in 2011.

    Filed under:

    Military

    Trump has repeated this claim 15 times

    "But you know what I've said, I don't want to talk about 'reform' because nobody knows what it means. That could be a tax increase. I said, 'How come it's been Ronald Reagan since you got the last big tax cut?' And they looked at me and said, 'We don't know.' And a lot of the great senators and the congressmen came up to see me and they had the 2018 tax reform. I said, 'What the hell does that mean? Are you going to raise taxes?' Then I found out this is what they've done for 40 years, tax reform. I said, 'Nobody knows what it means.'"

    Source: Campaign rally in Charleston, West Virginia

    in fact: Trump's history was inaccurate even if he was only talking only about his own party's tax cuts. In claiming "it's been Ronald Reagan since you got the last big tax cut," he again ignored the passage of George W. Bush's major tax cuts. (Those cuts were widely known as "the Bush tax cuts"; the formal names of Bush legislation used the phrase "tax relief": the "Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 and the "Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003.")

    Filed under:

    Taxes

    Past presidents

    Trump has repeated this claim 12 times

    "We want a strong, beautiful, clean environment. I want clean air. I want crystal clean water, and we've got it. We've got the cleanest country in the planet right now. There's nobody cleaner than us and it's getting better and better."

    Source: Campaign rally in Charleston, West Virginia

    in fact: It is tricky to rank countries on their environmental quality, but there is no mainstream assessment that has found that the U.S. has "the cleanest country on the planet." The Environmental Performance Index, developed by Yale University, Columbia University and the World Economic Forum, has the U.S. ranked 27th. The Associated Press reported: "The Associated Press consulted five databases and reports. Each showed countries with cleaner air both in dangerous small particles and in ozone, which is smog. For example, the Health Effects Institute's state of global air report found 65 countries with less smog when adjusted for season and population."

    Filed under:

    Environment

    "You know, when I ended the Paris Accord, what's a more beautiful name than the Paris Accord? Let's call it the West Virginia Accord -- maybe I would have signed it. But when I entered it, that was going to cost us hundreds of billions of dollars, hundreds of billions. And other countries, as an example, China didn't kick in until many years in the future. We kicked in immediately."

    Source: Campaign rally in Charleston, West Virginia

    in fact: As usual, Trump wrongly described how the Paris Accord works. It does not give China more time than the U.S. before it "kicks in," or give China more time than the U.S. to reduce emissions. Rather, it simply allows each nation to set its own voluntary targets. One of China's voluntary targets was to hit peak emissions around 2030. If the U.S. thought its own voluntary targets -- reducing emissions by 26 per cent to 28 per cent by 2025 -- were too burdensome on its economy, it could simply have changed them.

    Filed under:

    Environment

    Paris climate accord

    China

    Trump has repeated this claim 5 times

    "When we make a car, we sell it into China, and there's a 25 per cent tariff. And that's just the beginning, here's others. A man was driving down a street in China and he looked over and it was a Chevrolet, like Camaro, does that make sense? Is it a Camaro? I think it costs $39,000 or $40,000. He's in China. He's in Beijing and he shouts across -- they're stopped -- he then shouts across, 'Tell me, how much did that car cost in China?' Guy looks, '$119,000.' Now you understand that, right? It's all taxes and taxes and taxes. We can't do that anymore. Can't do it."

    Source: Campaign rally in Charleston, West Virginia

    in fact: Trump's price tag was way off, Bloomberg reported: "Only one model of Camaro is sold in China, a coupe with a 2.0-liter turbo engine, according to a spokeswoman for General Motors Co., which makes the car. The vehicle sells for 399,900 yuan ($58,430) in the Asian country, according to the local website of the Detroit-based automaker. That compares with a starting price of $25,905 for a similar Camaro coupe model in the U.S."

    Filed under:

    China

    Trade

    Tariffs


    Comment


      #3
      The trumpsters actually admit they believe any and all crap that comes out of Trump’s mouth. If Trump would say there’s a full size Boeing 747 flying around in the Oval Office, they would believe him. Why would they even admit that they are that gullible. When will they come with the white jackets to lock these guys up? These rejects from the human factory don’t deserve running around among normal (Republican/ Democrat) people.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Bayman View Post
        The trumpsters actually admit they believe any and all crap that comes out of Trump’s mouth. If Trump would say there’s a full size Boeing 747 flying around in the Oval Office, they would believe him. Why would they even admit that they are that gullible. When will they come with the white jackets to lock these guys up? These rejects from the human factory don’t deserve running around among normal (Republican/ Democrat) people.
        Oh my you mean there is not

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by donyt View Post
          Oh my you mean there is not
          Maybe there is. It all depends on what Trump says. Reality doesn’t matter.

          Comment


            #6
            Click image for larger version

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            CapMartin, Montr├®al
            "Belle de Dalhousie"
            1986 3270
            Volvo BB225B

            Comment


              #7
              Seems Trump has an excuse for everything.

              Trump disputes Puerto Rico's death toll from Hurricane Maria, accuses Democrats of inflating the number to make him 'look as bad as possible'

              Trumps Tweet
              ​“3000 people did not die in the two hurricanes that hit Puerto Rico,” he wrote. “When I left the Island, AFTER the storm had hit, they had anywhere from 6 to 18 deaths. As time went by it did not go up by much. Then, a long time later, they started to report really large numbers, like 3000…”​​​​​​
              ​​​​​​
              Watching crow being slowly eaten in the PNW.
              The village idiot strikes again.

              Comment

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