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    Labor shortage

    We have a crises, is called lack of willing employees, or better described as why work when the Gov. takes care of me. Let all the dummies work pay taxes ( yes still working have not learned ) so hoping Pres. Trump will put the brakes on the hand out.
    Old Glue

    #2
    Huh?

    Yeah, going to need you to explain that one. I would rather term it as lack of people with needed skillsets.

    Trump got elected on the backs of blue collar white working class people like miners. These people have skillsets that are outdated due to automation and changing industries. This is going to be a pretty slippery slope if you want to keep going down it.
    Matt Train
    BOC Site Team
    Chicagoland, IL

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      #3
      Matt, we gotta be careful with that one...

      For every techie job function there are and always will be a bunch of people doing “regular” work. Just look around at the sheer numbers of people. The people driving all the vehicles, the people maintaining all the infrastructure, even the people that serve the starbucks coffee we all seem to enjoy. The list is endless, if you look around.

      Think about this...

      The most important guy in the world is the plumber when your toilet gets stopped up.

      This comes into play when we think of social safety nets...

      When the “value” someone can get from combining the social safety nets reaches a certain point, then people will start choosing that over work.

      Having society put in place mechanisims where the “average joe” can make a decent living creates an incentive to work.

      Another thing to think about, regarding miners.

      If you didn’t grow it... it came from a mine. Think about that and apply it to all the “stuff” you see every day. We might think we live in a virtual world, but that world depends on raw materials that blue collar workers took from the ground at some point.

      KEVIN SANDERS
      4788 LISAS WAY
      SEWARD, ALASKA

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        #4
        Yes skill set is necessary but we need bodies willing to be trained and or be retrained. In the composite industry we lack the entry level worker willing to spend the time to learn the skill to become technicians, what we get in the door is bringing baggage with them, the drug epidemic is all around us, advertise and mention Drug testing you will see 0 applicant. Yes the are good ones out there most of the are college bound so that dose not solve the problem at the bottom end. I just read where the USAF is short 2000 pilots and Boeing is having problems finding help, so where dose that leave a shop that repairs boats and so on /
        Old Glue

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          #5
          I don't think a plumber is commoditized. Same for an automotive mechanic. There will always be room - and pay - for the best examples of those.

          But if your "regular" work is being threatened by market changes, the government is not going to help you. That's on YOU. If you are a miner and your job is replaced by an automated machine, then it is incumbent on you to get trained in new skills.

          Vehicle drivers are the next ones to go. Once vehicle automation becomes mass-accepted, the UPS and taxi drivers of the world will find themselves pushed out. But the guy in charge of developing use cases and development of that automated car? He has a job for a very long time....and something that pays well, too.
          Matt Train
          BOC Site Team
          Chicagoland, IL

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            #6
            It is definitely not a labor shortage, it is more like a surplus of unskilled labor keeping labor prices down. And an abundance of the attitude that certain jobs are below doing. Many of my coworkers grew up here in Bellingham and Mount Vernon. When they were in high school they picked blueberries. Heck, even my fiancé did. Buses took the kids from the city out to the farms. They don't do that anymore, now the labor pool is east Indians from Canada and illegal aliens from way down south. The east Indians are doing it the smart way, they are buying houses with small farms and getting their E2 Visa in the process so they can bring the whole family down. The plain Jane white kids don't seem to want to work there anymore doing that kind of labor because it is work. Tons of homeless up here too. Too many incentives provided for them to stay here.

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              #7
              The drugs are definitely a problem. There is definitely an opiate problem everywhere in America today.
              Boeing, they are always lobbying for more visas so they can import cheaper labor.

              Comment


                #8
                Green you have it, the kids delivered papers worked in yards bagged groceries so on, thereby picking op a work ethic, but now the law will not permit that. In most instances there required to be 18, in my shop technically it is not allowed, we chemicals on hand so mowing the grass is out.
                Old Glue

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Download_Complete View Post
                  I don't think a plumber is commoditized. Same for an automotive mechanic. There will always be room - and pay - for the best examples of those.

                  But if your "regular" work is being threatened by market changes, the government is not going to help you. That's on YOU. If you are a miner and your job is replaced by an automated machine, then it is incumbent on you to get trained in new skills.

                  Vehicle drivers are the next ones to go. Once vehicle automation becomes mass-accepted, the UPS and taxi drivers of the world will find themselves pushed out. But the guy in charge of developing use cases and development of that automated car? He has a job for a very long time....and something that pays well, too.
                  I agree completely!

                  People need to look at their specific industry and not get caught unaware when changes happen. That is not a role of government.


                  KEVIN SANDERS
                  4788 LISAS WAY
                  SEWARD, ALASKA

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Does any one think that there should be more options for trade schools and apprenticeships for some of our students. The complete focus of the school system seems to be that you go to college or you are not going to be successful. There are a lot of young people out there that are not wired for years of classroom but when given classes with solid hands-on objects to build or repair they do great.
                    Just my 2 cents
                    Last edited by Nemisis; 11-14-2017, 08:56 PM.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Nemisis View Post
                      Dose any one think that there should be more options for trade schools and apprenticeships for some of our students. The complete focus of the school system seems to be that you go to college or you are not going to be successful. There are a lot of young people out there that are not wired for years of classroom but when given classes with solid hands-on objects to build or repair they do great.
                      Just my 2 cents
                      That's exactly where I think the next "job boom" is going to be. We just don't have enough qualified warm bodies to fill those positions, and the support system in schools that feed that pipeline is very much withered.

                      It's also incumbent on our school system to educate young kids on their options. I spoke to it earlier with Mike Rowe - he is really pushing hard for a blue collar system of training that provides a path to jobs that is highly paying and also highly rewarding.

                      When I went through the system, it was strongly hinted that if i wanted to hit my income targets, my only real option was a 4 year university and a nice safe corporate job where you work 35 years and retire. Most of that advice is still somewhat valid, but the idea of getting in to one company and retiring with it is laughable these days. It was also focused on the wrong thing - we don't focus on finding and developing talent, we just leave that for college, and tell kids to go and figure it out when they get there. I actually think that needs to occur earlier in the process, to save kids from college expense if it ultimately doesn't work out.



                      Matt Train
                      BOC Site Team
                      Chicagoland, IL

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Nemisis View Post
                        Dose any one think that there should be more options for trade schools and apprenticeships for some of our students. The complete focus of the school system seems to be that you go to college or you are not going to be successful. There are a lot of young people out there that are not wired for years of classroom but when given classes with solid hands-on objects to build or repair they do great.
                        Just my 2 cents
                        I worked in education over 30 years and could not agree more. We need to start earlier with this (ie not 11th grade, but more like 7-8th grade) and confront the reality that not everyone can, or should go to college. There are many students who have undetected skills and talents that go wasted because they feel that they cannot be successful in a traditional academic program. They seem to handle this well in Germany, we would do well to study what they have done.
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                          #13
                          I think in general you are seeing a "right sizing" of college education in that it provides tangible value, but only when wielded correctly and with the right person.

                          If you are going to run a Post Office, you probably don't need a business degree.

                          At my old job we outright scorned anyone who applied with an MBA. Reason being none of them fit our hiring model (we wanted young fresh-outs or currently in school, CHEAP, and HUNGRY), and they wanted six figures to service a skillset that would barely put them above customer service to start out.

                          It makes much more sense to go get an MBA later in life after, say, 10 years of on the job experience.

                          Same for regular college degrees. There are far too many jobs out there that "require" a college degree, when what they really need is sound on the job training. And I believe you are seeing employers realizing that sometimes, hunger and desire will beat out college degrees every single time. Case in point: Same company as above. They start you as a customer service agent learning our platform....and when you work your way up you get to express a desire to work elsewhere in the company. Say you want to learn web design but don't have the work experience. No problem. As part of your potential promotion out of CS, you are sent to a training program and then a part time internship down in the Web Design department. Hack it there and the promotion becomes permanent and you transfer to your new desk.

                          It worked great, and we had an employee retention rate somewhere in the low 90s percentile. And from a management perspective it was cheaper to reward a hard working employee than hiring in a college grad who was not engaged in the company and didn't otherwise care.
                          Matt Train
                          BOC Site Team
                          Chicagoland, IL

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Download_Complete View Post
                            At my old job we outright scorned anyone who applied with an MBA. Reason being none of them fit our hiring model (we wanted young fresh-outs or currently in school, CHEAP, and HUNGRY), and they wanted six figures to service a skillset that would barely put them above customer service to start out.
                            I have an MBA and if you're 28 and hold one... you're correct. BUT... That being said I make $40K-$50K a year more than my peers because of it. Don't rule out a graduate degree if your career can benefit from it. I barely finished High School and never thought much of higher education until I found myself riding around planes working for guys making twice my salary and toting Horticulture or Phys Ed Degrees,





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                              #15
                              Originally posted by Download_Complete View Post

                              . I spoke to it earlier with Mike Rowe
                              You know Mike Rowe? Tell him that when he did Dirty Jobs and he was at the auto dismantler and the guy cut the a/c hose and blew the refrigerant all over the atmosphere, they broke so many environmental laws it isn't even funny.

                              Heh

                              Boatless at this time

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