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Trying to figure out what live aboard expenses?-gctid427201

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    #16
    My buddy had a 35' Roughwater trawler with a 120 hp Lehman. He cruised at 7 knots burning about .5-.7 gallon per hour. He usually left early and got there late and always had money in his wallet!
    Two C's 1990 3888 MY, 175 Hinos, Hurth 630 Trannys
    Past Commodore Emerald Rose Yacht Club
    Member International Order of the Blue Gavel
    MMSI: 338030604

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      #17
      For diesels I would rate them as follows:

      Ford Lehman's. This is a work horse and economical. I have friends that get 2-3 MPG. You won't get there fast but as stated, you will still have money in your pocket. Parts are still available both for the engine and marine side.

      Detroit's. These are designed to go fast. They don't like being idled for long periods of time. They are expensive to maintain, leak oil and generally will require a mechanic to do anything, especially fuel related. Parts are readily available but expensive.

      Volvo's. Good engines, not as economical as the Lehman and cost a lot more for parts, which are available.

      Cummin's. They make a great engine. Not an overly economical engine, but have good HP to burn ratios. Parts are readily available but expensive. Fuel burn is going to get you around 1 MPG.

      Cat. The 3208 naturally aspirated is a work horse. You can abuse the heck out of these engines and they just seem to take it. They have about the same HP to fuel burn as the Cummin's. Parts are same as the Cummin's too.

      Hino's. These are commercial truck engines made in Japan and have been marinized here in the US. They are great engines. We have the 250 HP 6 cylinders and get about 2 MPG at 8-9 knots. Parts are available for the engines. The only draw back is the marine exhaust is made of aluminum and is not an off the shelf item. Owners will have them coated to protect them and Earl (The Hino Guru) I believe has been able to have them replicated. Parts

      My preference if I could have any engine in a boat would be the Lehman's. But that is just me. Don't get me wrong, I like my Hino's and ... well they came with the boat.

      As for boats. We spent a year looking at boats. We like the heavy design of the traditional trawlers. They make for a very comfortable ride in less than ideal conditions. All that weight and deep hull really makes a difference. Space wise they are not bad depending on the design. A design you may want to look at is the 42 Pondarosa. But this is a aft cabin and will require climbing. What we found in our search was that you could not beat the Bayliner 45 or 47 for providing you with the space of a much larger vessel. As a live a board she is very roomy and comfortable. Bayliner used engineering to design her economical to build and sell instead of just adding tons of fiberglass to make them strong. The cost is a lighter boat that is more proned to bounce around in less than perfect conditions.

      Trawlers with walk around decks are great for working the decks. They provide you with a great deal of safety especially when we start to get a little older, but at a cost of living space inside. Those decks will eat up at least 4-5 feet of beam in the salon. Having boats that are low to the water makes them easier to handle lines when docking. You won't have your ladder or stairs set up at marinas other than your own when you get there. For us these were important things to consider as we are not as limber as we use to be.

      One last word on boats. Beam is everything. It will give you stability and comfort. For every foot of beam, I would say it is worth 4 feet in length.

      P.S. Sorry for being so wordy.
      Patrick and Patti
      4588 Pilothouse 1991
      12ft Endeavor RIB 2013
      M/V "Paloma"
      MMSI # 338142921

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        #18
        Fish Tales wrote:
        I need as much distance per gallon as possible as the admiral and I will not be liveaboards that stay tied to the dock. Are there any choices that I should include that I did not?
        The greatest distance you can put on a gallon of fuel would be in a trawler. I have a pair of Lehmans in mine and with 600 gallons of fuel I could theoretically put 240 and 300 hours on between fills. That equates to about 2400 miles. That would make for a pretty long season.

        I put 49 gallons of fuel in my boat last year when I bought it and am down about 100 for last years total running. It's fun knowing that fuel is the least expensive part about owning a boat now.

        /[/QUOTE]
        Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

        iBoatNW

        1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

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          #19
          Thanks for all the input. I currently have twin Cat. 3208T/260 horse in the 35' and when on the cruise 16K I run about 1 mpg. They do not like too much idle time, make a good cloud when throttled up after fishing salmon for eight hours.

          Greg

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            #20
            Fish Tales wrote:
            Thanks for all the input. I currently have twin Cat. 3208T/260 horse in the 35' and when on the cruise 16K I run about 1 mpg. They do not like too much idle time, make a good cloud when throttled up after fishing salmon for eight hours.

            Greg
            Slow to hull speed or less and your fuel usage will decrease significantly......

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              #21
              Merry Christmas,

              Anyone have experience with Cummins 555's naturals. How is longevity and fuel burn with two of these on a 48 ft trawler. I have looked at so many boats that my eyes are crossed. The admiral has her list of needs to have, the nice to have list is managable. All in all I guess we are having fun.

              Greg

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                #22
                "Triple nickels" are great engines. They were built as a direct competitor to the Cat 3208.

                Maintained properly, 10k+ hours is not a problem for that engine.

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                  #23
                  Thanks Pete.

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                    #24
                    Fish Tales wrote:
                    Thanks for the help, need more as the admiral wants to know where in the PNW would be a good place to be a liveaboard. We have experience with the San Juan Islands as visitors for a week or two at a time, but for longer periods it would be nice to get some input from the experienced group here.
                    [SIZE]3 wrote:
                    [/SIZE]We have lived here for 5 years on our '92 4588 and it has worked very well. The most important thing I can think of is heat. You have to have a good dependable heat source and electricity really won't cut in unless you can get one of the 50 amp services and even then it's marginal.

                    Live aboard moorage here for a 50 foot slip is about $600 per mo. including power, garbage, water and a parking place. We have not had a lot of trouble with the boat other than having to have the furnace overhauled. The normal wear and tear on the boat is still the same as any boat kept in the water, but we did up grade the toilet to a freshwater TECMA which eliminated any hint of odor. We have done a lot of little things. We converted the guest head into a pantry by putting shelves in the shower stall, got rid of the electricc stove and this past summer we put in new counter tops, carpet and upholstery. Nor unlike what you would do in a 20 year old house

                    Bish Wheeler

                    Friday Harbor

                    I think exxpences you are seeing here are pretty accurate.

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                      #25
                      We have the 35' Viking up for sale and are doing work on the house to get it ready for sale. The admiral is retired now and is very involved with the boat search. We are trying to figure out how to do the down size. The kids and Grandchildren are looking at all the stuff and trying to figure out what they would like. One question that has come up is what to do with the rifles, shotguns, and handguns. I do intend to cruise into Canada and know that weapons will not be allowed, so what do you cruising livaboards do with the firearms when cruising foreign countries. Does the flare gun cause issues at the border? Last three trips into Canada I never even thought about it, and the customs folks never asked.

                      Mean while I'll be out in the garage sorting through things. anyone need a canoe, nothern lights 12 kw genset, 5 hp compressor, 500 lbs of fishing tackle, and a partridge in a pear tree. Decluttering may be the hardest part of this adventure. Don't ya just love it.

                      Greg

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                        #26
                        Greg

                        Your Long guns are no problem at the border,,,, it is a $25 permit issued at check in, 20 minutes extra tops.

                        Even faster if you fill out the forms ahead of time.

                        The rules

                        http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publicati...-eng.html#P010

                        The form

                        http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/f...e/pdfs/909.pdf

                        You are allowed 200 rounds as well.

                        Hand guns should be left with a relative or friend to hold while you are away. You can bring them but it is a lot of hassle and paperwork.

                        Declare your guns to US Customs before you leave same as a good Camera or laptop so you will have no hassles when you return.

                        I have far more work taking my guns aboard to the US than you will have coming to Canada.

                        I must get a temporary inport permit, a hunting licence and wait 12 weeks for paperwork to cross, so you know

                        what I do all winter to be ready for boating season.

                        I have a locking rack aboard plus trigger locks for each firearm.

                        I also have an electronic safe for ammo and important papers permenantly installed in an unobvious place.

                        As a liveaboard, even without guns, installing a safe is good policy for important papers and items you wish to have secure

                        when you are away from the boat. Passports, documents, cruising cash and the admirals's jewellery all go in the safe and

                        add a measure of security for liveaboards.

                        Mine was through bolted and 5200ed in place in the back of a cabinet with a bunch of junk in front of it that no one would want to

                        paw through looking for stuff worth stealing.
                        "Adios Dinero"
                        1997 3988 with new 330 Cummins
                        Photo Credit: Whiskywizard

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                          #27
                          Papa Charlie wrote:


                          Detroit's. These are designed to go fast. They don't like being idled for long periods of time. They are expensive to maintain, leak oil and generally will require a mechanic to do anything, especially fuel related. Parts are readily available but expensive.

                          .
                          They do not leak oil

                          They self extrude a petroleum based preservative
                          Boatless at this time

                          A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including their life."

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