Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My liveaboard costs Bayliner 4788 Seward Alaska

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    My liveaboard costs Bayliner 4788 Seward Alaska

    Here’s what it costs me to liveaboard in seward Alaska on my 2001 Bayliner 4788

    Boat costs (this of course varies by the boat)

    Purchase Cost $225K
    Insurance $3,200 per year
    Break - fix maintenance About $1000 per year in parts average
    Bottom paint $3,000 every four years so $800 per year
    None of this includes upgrades, and my boat is not needing catch up of defered maintenance

    Slip costs

    Slip rental $3200 per year for a 50’ slip
    Electricity $130 average
    Diesel Fuel for heat averages 325 gallons a winter




    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
    where are we right now​​​​​​???​

    https://share.findmespot.com/shared/...j23OquWOj2N3Xe

    #2
    Thanks for sharing this info !

    Comment


      #3
      So, if my math is correct, a bit less than $8,000 a year? That's less than 1/2 of what my property taxes are for my house. If I add in the other carrying costs, PLUS MAINTENANCE!, I'd say you are floating pretty high, that or I am slowly sinking!!

      Comment


      • ksanders
        ksanders commented
        Editing a comment
        Yea, i still own a house though. They are financial boat anchors.

      #4
      I just fueled up my boat yesterday. 58 gallons of pure heating. Last fill up was Sept 22. That is 58 gallons divided by 52 days or 1.1 gallons per day average.

      Temps during this time were generally highs in the 40’s with even a day or two at 50. Lows have been in the 30’s.

      KEVIN SANDERS
      4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
      where are we right now​​​​​​???​

      https://share.findmespot.com/shared/...j23OquWOj2N3Xe

      Comment


        #5
        I'll borrow Mr. Sanders format:

        Here’s what it costs me to liveaboard in Ft. Myers FL on our 1997 Bayliner 4788

        Boat costs (this of course varies by the boat)

        Purchase Cost $123K
        Insurance $2,400 per year
        Break - fix maintenance About $5000 per year in parts and labor average so far...but we are in "catch up" mode on maintenance items. Hopefully lest as we get caught up.
        Bottom paint $2,800 every three years = $933 per year
        None of this includes upgrades and costs for the center console dinghy we have.

        Slip costs - Note that it is tough to pull together monthly slip costs because of our love of anchoring so I'll give an average of when we have been in a slip.

        Slip rental $705 per month for a 50’ slip
        $125 Livaboard fee
        Electricity $155 average
        Diesel Mileage - roughly 5 gph at 7.5 kts. We have spent roughly $3740 in fuel this year over 1509 miles.
        Diesel Fuel for heat - Zero

        We have No Plan and we're sticking to it...,

        Comment


          #6
          Originally posted by kspellman02 View Post
          ... Diesel Fuel for heat - Zero
          Okay... now you're just rubbing it in.

          Jim

          Comment


            #7
            Originally posted by Less Is Moor View Post
            Okay... now you're just rubbing it in.

            Jim
            I know! I’m jealous!

            KEVIN SANDERS
            4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
            where are we right now​​​​​​???​

            https://share.findmespot.com/shared/...j23OquWOj2N3Xe

            Comment


              #8
              Interesting, here is ours for the last 12 months from my Quick books tracking.

              Moorage (covered includes electricity) $12,788
              Insurance $1,248
              Maintenance $718
              Pump Out Service $525
              Fuel $735
              Storage $2,475
              PO Box $229
              Bottom Paint $5,000 every 6-7 years (nice part about being in fresh water most of the time at the mouth of a river
              Zincs and Diver $315
              Registration $525
              Boat Payment $To Much

              Comment


                #9
                Just added fuel again. It’s been 28 days and I took on 51 gallons of diesel. Not bad for Alaska!

                KEVIN SANDERS
                4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                where are we right now​​​​​​???​

                https://share.findmespot.com/shared/...j23OquWOj2N3Xe

                Comment


                  #10
                  Are you leaving your slip to refuel or wheeling a 55 gal drum down and pumping?

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Originally posted by cory View Post
                    Are you leaving your slip to refuel or wheeling a 55 gal drum down and pumping?
                    I’m filling up three 6 gallon gas cans and putting them in my cart. The fuel dock is open if I call ahead but I don’t want to have to re-winterize my engines, and Ido not want to taske the risk of a freeze up of the engines if i’m away at work for a few days at a time even though I really do not think it’s a risk.

                    This is my first real winter of staying aboard. I have kept the heat on during previous winters but only on low to keep the boat dry.

                    I was pretty sure I had enough fuel onboard at the start of winter to last but filling up the tank gives me peace of mind, and insures that if it ets really cold and icky I can get by.

                    KEVIN SANDERS
                    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                    where are we right now​​​​​​???​

                    https://share.findmespot.com/shared/...j23OquWOj2N3Xe

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Hi All,

                      Love all the scenarios and feedback people have about their expenses of living aboard.
                      Being totally at square 1, about Living aboard, permanently, I thought I would put together an expense worksheet, Just to get the idea of what goes into it.

                      So, My approach for budgeting this, I did based on frequency. Just to see how the start-up figures are in comparison to Following years figures.
                      The expenses that I think of at first fit into 1 of 5 categories. (this may be modified, but for now).

                      One-Time - Boat Purchase.
                      Bi-Yearly - Registration.
                      Yearly - Insurance. (Could be Monthly, figured based on expense, pay it Lump Sum and not worry for 11 months)..
                      Monthly - Basic operating Expenses. (Fuel, other misc.....)

                      Unknown timeframes - Repairs, Services, Other Misc.

                      I know there is a lot more to it, than the way it is written. I didn't want to write a novel.

                      Just looking for feedback of which expense and at what frequency tends to work for most situations.

                      Take Care

                      Wind Chill

                      Comment


                        #13
                        There is routine maintenance that happens through the year, zinks, wiper blades, washing, oil changes
                        Then there is maintenance that happens on 5 year cycles like bottom paint
                        Then there is maintenance that happens on 10 year cycles like canvas and cushions
                        Then there is maintenance that happens on 15 year cycles like heat exchangers and navigation equipment
                        Then there is maintenance that happens on 20 year cycles like boat painting, heaters, generators, water makers

                        None of this accounts for unexpected repairs.
                        Azzurra
                        Seattle, WA
                        Ocean Alexander 54

                        Comment


                          #14
                          A fellow on another site summed it up best I think. He said "Even as we sit here quietly at the dock, enjoying our drinks, things are breaking."
                          (Caltexflanc on TrawlerForum)

                          The thing is, even if you do absolutely nothing, stuff will break. For instance, just a couple weeks ago the light by my bunk quit. It's been fine for perhaps six or eight years. Suddenly nothing. It wasn't the bulb. Somehow a wire had vibrated "just" enough to not be seated well. No power, no light.

                          Troubleshooting took some time. Gathering the tools to fix took more. Fixing it (twice because that's the way things go sometimes) took time.
                          And then there was the "well, while I'm at it I really should..."

                          Basically fixing one small light by my bunk took a couple hours. It is Almost never convenient to reach the items you need. Oh, I've gone through the where it goes bit -- and stuff will change Wind Chill.

                          At first for instance, my drill was easily accessible as were my entire screw collection. Now, not so much.
                          Oh, and since I'm going to spend your perfectly good money, as you run across stainless steel screws (small ones and up to about 1" long) buy 'em. Ditto nuts and bolts. Pick quarter/20's. That means 1/4" across and 20 threads to the inch. You will find quarter/20's Necessary in boat stuff. Ditto 8x32's which will be used in a lot of electronics.

                          Only buy stainless steel.

                          Anyway, what I'm saying is that each job will usually entail the words "dig out" or "unload locker" or "go to the store to buy"
                          You're not going to hear very often, it was a five minute job unless that is followed by the words "and it only took me three weeks to complete"

                          Honestly, for me the challenge is fun. It's lots more fun AFTER the project is done than in the middle of same.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X