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    #16
    On near homeless people living aboard: when I was young there were many more modest marinas with reasonable rates. I can remember 50¢/foot. But the government has regulated all of them out of business. Where I grew up there were at least 20 marinas of all sizes within 5 miles on both sides of a river, and many more up and down river. All gone now except for a city run marina. Many of those old marinas catered to less affluent boat owners. They had crappy docks and poor parking, but at least there was a place you could afford to tie up. An number had a small ship or barge as the fuel dock. Lots of wood WWII minesweepers like the Calypso, some old riverboats. As a kid I had a great time exploring the unused parts of those old ships and boats.
    Growing up in the 1950s, I earned money on most of the docks doing odd jobs, hauling groceries for old people. Sometimes clearing flood debris. Later I ran boats for the weekend drunks. Many of the marinas had a tavern and there was a active social life on the river now gone. Now it's just yachts aimlessly cruising up and down. No good places to stop, no docks and no old ship captains with their stories. A part of America now only in the history books.

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      #17
      It is true regarding the platforms may differ however the views are the same. The difference is in amenities. Those with larger boats or budgets tend to have the niceties such as lots of water, refrigeration and ice. Now, ten plus years into this journey, I too have those things. I am blessed.

      Having enough solar to run the reefer 24/7 was a big improvement in my happiness quotient. Over here on the west coast of Florida those sea breezes I was used to on the east coast simply did not exist. Women (gross generality upcoming!) tend to expect a certain level of decadence, especially as we age. Some fellows cannot see the importance of simple things -- like ample hot water, and space. We need space away from you!!!

      Be it to bake you a treat in our oven, or plot murder. In either event, being away (line of sight) from you is helpful. In a house we could get into the car and go shopping or out to lunch. Aboard a boat, especially one at anchor... well, the options are few.

      Uber helps.

      As for me, I've got Seaweed. And someday I'll have a fellow with his own boat who might like to cruise in tandem. It is more fun out here with someone to say "did you see that turtle?" or "porpoise off your port transom" ... my Bob (he is the fellow in the Time Stopped article) was my cruising friend, albeit over the phone. For him, I suspect my journey was his vicarious trip too. I'm not certain who was mentoring whom.

      Link to article:

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        #18
        Originally posted by janice142
        It is true regarding the platforms may differ however the views are the same. The difference is in amenities. Those with larger boats or budgets tend to have the niceties such as lots of water, refrigeration and ice. Now, ten plus years into this journey, I too have those things. I am blessed.

        Having enough solar to run the reefer 24/7 was a big improvement in my happiness quotient. Over here on the west coast of Florida those sea breezes I was used to on the east coast simply did not exist. Women (gross generality upcoming!) tend to expect a certain level of decadence, especially as we age. Some fellows cannot see the importance of simple things -- like ample hot water, and space. We need space away from you!!!

        Be it to bake you a treat in our oven, or plot murder. In either event, being away (line of sight) from you is helpful. In a house we could get into the car and go shopping or out to lunch. Aboard a boat, especially one at anchor... well, the options are few.

        Uber helps.
        Janice,
        Thank you for your perspective. I will come back to your thoughts when considering future plans for my wife & I to join the permanent "live aboard" crowd. She does not have the same passion that I do so far.
        She does like to bake but hopefully not "plotting murder"... lol I hate to say that I might be part of that plot if it did exist... lol

        John
        1986 Marinette 39 Sedan after enjoying our 1984 Marinette 28
        (formerly 89 2755 5.8 OMC & 97 1850SS 4.3L Alpha I)

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          #19
          Originally posted by Lepke View Post
          On near homeless people living aboard: when I was young there were many more modest marinas with reasonable rates. I can remember 50¢/foot. But the government has regulated all of them out of business. Where I grew up there were at least 20 marinas of all sizes within 5 miles on both sides of a river, and many more up and down river. All gone now except for a city run marina. Many of those old marinas catered to less affluent boat owners. They had crappy docks and poor parking, but at least there was a place you could afford to tie up. An number had a small ship or barge as the fuel dock. Lots of wood WWII minesweepers like the Calypso, some old riverboats. As a kid I had a great time exploring the unused parts of those old ships and boats.
          Growing up in the 1950s, I earned money on most of the docks doing odd jobs, hauling groceries for old people. Sometimes clearing flood debris. Later I ran boats for the weekend drunks. Many of the marinas had a tavern and there was a active social life on the river now gone. Now it's just yachts aimlessly cruising up and down. No good places to stop, no docks and no old ship captains with their stories. A part of America now only in the history books.
          The old timers are mostly gone... and so too is the lifestyle. I wonder how it all went so wrong. Now waterfront life, at least in populated areas, is much more sterile. I miss the "rough and ready" old timers that were not Politically Correct, yet treated everybody with respect. They held open doors, walked on the street side of the sidewalk, and consequently made a woman feel like a lady.

          I wish now that I had paid more attention then to the stories of how things were way back when they were young. Those tales are for the most part lost. The stories are sometimes found in books on Gutenberg though: http://gutenberg.org

          As for me, I miss the ramshackle places. Folks took pride in what they had, and took care of it too.

          The same can be said of most boaters today. We take care of our homes, and try to do all we can to make them even better than they were yesterday. Really, it is only a few who are bums and every part of society has their dregs. Boats are more visible and issues are less likely to be hidden behind closed doors. Out here, we see and hear everything.



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          • michel
            michel commented
            Editing a comment
            In populated areas you are bang on. However in small towns, at least in BC the old timers and working docks still exists. My home town dock(im not docked there) as a very active waterfront, almost as busy as in the 80's and a bit better actually in some ways.

          #20
          Originally posted by shade2u2 View Post

          Janice,
          Thank you for your perspective. I will come back to your thoughts when considering future plans for my wife & I to join the permanent "live aboard" crowd. She does not have the same passion that I do so far.
          She does like to bake but hopefully not "plotting murder"... lol I hate to say that I might be part of that plot if it did exist... lol
          Thankks shade2u2.
          One mistake I have seen time and time again is that Initial Trip. Make it nice, MAKE IT SHORT (a couple hours if possible), and the destination needs to be a Resort -- be it a charming older place or a spiffy modern Everything joint. THIS CRUISE HAS TO BE FUN. Traveling at six or fifteen knots across long stretches of boring waterway won't work.

          Remember: Short trip. Great Destination. A day or two to enjoy said spot, then home.
          Painless, easy, nothing Scary and don't go if the weather is foul.

          I do not move Seaweed unless the forecast says "smooth" or "light chop" (over here that is a fairly frequent event as waters are protected)
          Moderate chop is not fun, so I don't go then. I stay tucked into a nice little nook, cove, or dock until my trip will be uneventful.

          As for your destination on the first trip with the wife, the ideal would be a Spiffy Marina with a restaurant attached. Sitting around shooting the breeze with other boat gals can work wonders. Some marinas have lounges where boaters gather, solving all the problems in the world while shooting the breeze.
          Be sure to find out where the boaters go for breakfast. There is usually a breakfast diner that has a contingent of boaters who go for morning coffee, bagels and eggs. Go there.

          Good luck.

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            #21
            I am currently also researching that same question. Would love to read more replies.

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              #22
              We are lucky to have a house and a boat in the water, and live on our social security income. In California. How is this possible? Well, we both worked 50 years for starters, and paid our bills off, and saved money. We raised 4 kids, have grandchildren, and enjoy our life. The boat is a 2455 Bayliner, and is quite comfortable for a weekend, but I wouldn't like to live on it full time, or a larger boat either. The view of Franks Tract is wonderful, we see Egrets, Cranes and Herons most everyday were on the water. We do more wading than swimming these days, we meet nice people and their kids.

              So with good planning you can have both and not work. We don't drink or smoke or do drugs. This alone saves enough to buy a nice boat.
              So how your life turns out is a matter of making good choices for the most part. You make your own luck, good or bad.

              I have no desire to live on a boat in the winter. The wind and rain and cold take all the fun out of it.

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                #23
                Originally posted by Ed Heiser View Post
                We are lucky to have a house and a boat in the water, and live on our social security income. In California. How is this possible? Well, we both worked 50 years for starters, and paid our bills off, and saved money. We raised 4 kids, have grandchildren, and enjoy our life. The boat is a 2455 Bayliner, and is quite comfortable for a weekend, but I wouldn't like to live on it full time, or a larger boat either. The view of Franks Tract is wonderful, we see Egrets, Cranes and Herons most everyday were on the water. We do more wading than swimming these days, we meet nice people and their kids.

                So with good planning you can have both and not work. We don't drink or smoke or do drugs. This alone saves enough to buy a nice boat.
                So how your life turns out is a matter of making good choices for the most part. You make your own luck, good or bad.

                I have no desire to live on a boat in the winter. The wind and rain and cold take all the fun out of it.
                The “fun” of living on a boat really depends on the platform.

                There are several here, myself included that stay on their boat either full or part time.

                Some have decided, (or it just happened that way) that they do not need a land based home. Several have condo’s in temperate climates, and stay on their boats seasonally.

                Most have larger boats than your 2455 Bayliner. Not a darn thing wrong with the 2455, but it would not be my preferred platform to stay aboard for any length of time. It’s a weekend boat to me.

                Most stay aboards seem to have boats starting at around 38 feet, just to have the facilities that make staying aboard for an extended time more plesant.

                KEVIN SANDERS
                4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                where are we right now​​​​​​???​

                https://share.findmespot.com/shared/...j23OquWOj2N3Xe

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                  #24
                  Lots of good info from some very seasoned owners for those considering the move to a boat. Like Ed, we have both, a home and a 2655 Ciera. Good for a weekend or even a 1 or 2 week cruise for a couple, but certainly not enough space as a permanent live aboard. But that is because the Admiral wouldnt ever consider life on a boat. I did so before we were married. I'm now hankering to move up to a 3055/305 model with an eye to some more extended cruising the ICW but the Admiral won't buy it. At least not yet.


                  1998 BL Ciera 2655 Sunbridge LX (Special Edition)
                  "Sea Flights"
                  5.7L 2bbl w/Thunderbolt Ignition and raw water cooling
                  A​​​​​​lpha I Gen II Sterndrive/1.45:1 gears
                  M15.25 X 15P Black Max prop
                  MFG Extra's - A/C, Fresh Water Engine Flush port, HWH and Windlass
                  Docks @ Punta Gorda, Florida

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