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    Back on my little floating home

    Well... i am back on my little floating home after spending the last three weeks helping with the earthquake repair, which then became a major remodeling project around the house.

    Happy to escape the contractors!

    late fall is here in seward Alaska and except for the commercial fishermen, the docks are empty for the winter.

    Although I like the hustle and bustle of tourist and recreational boating season here in Alaska, it sure is nice just hanging out in the winter here.

    More outside photos in the morning once it’s light.



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    KEVIN SANDERS
    4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
    www.transferswitch4less.com

    where are we right now?

    https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

    #2
    Gonna be down to about 4 hours of daylight soon though huh?
    SeniorEta 1993 Bayliner 2859 7.4L

    Comment


      #3
      Little? Daylight? Alaska?
      2004 Monterey 282 Cruiser
      Twin Volvo Penta 5.0GXi-E
      SX-M 1.6gr Outdrives
      Docks @ Punta Gorda, Florida

      Comment


        #4
        At least you didn't go to any trouble cleaning up before taking the pics.
        "The Profit"
        Sunny Florida
        2019 Tahoe T16 75 hp 300 hours in first year of ownership!
        2018 E16 75 hp......Sold

        Comment


          #5
          Yes, the daylight is decreasing. In the dead of winter it gets light around 0900 and dark around 0400 pm

          Nope, didn’t clean up. The stuff on the bar is just as I left it

          KEVIN SANDERS
          4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
          www.transferswitch4less.com

          where are we right now?

          https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

          Comment


            #6
            This is what waking up in seward Alaska in late October is like.

            It’s about 40 degrees right now, and it will get up to probably close to 50 today.

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            KEVIN SANDERS
            4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
            www.transferswitch4less.com

            where are we right now?

            https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

            Comment


              #7
              and then the day turns gorgeous

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              KEVIN SANDERS
              4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
              www.transferswitch4less.com

              where are we right now?

              https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

              Comment


              • pgiconch
                pgiconch commented
                Editing a comment
                Very nice.

              #8
              Great shots, Kevin. You are a yachtsman. The correct placement for the US flag is never on the bow pulpit, though. Real boaters fly the ensign on the stern. From USPS:

              The U.S. national ensign, sometimes called "50-star" or "Old Glory," is the proper and preferred flag for all U.S. vessels. Your boat should wear it from 0800 until sunset, and when you enter or leave port during daylight or at night, weather and rig permitting. While in port, if you leave your boat and will not return before sunset, lower and stow the national ensign before you go.

              The national ensign worn by a vessel must be the flag of her registry—not necessarily that of the owner or operator.

              Generally, the national ensign should be displayed at the peak of the gaff, i.e., the outer end of the spar extending aft from the mast of your boat—if you boat has a gaff. If it does not, fly it from the flagstaff at your boat's stern. If your boat has an overhanging boom or an outboard motor, your flagstaff may be offset to starboard (preferably) from your boat's centerline.

              On a sportfishing boat, where a stern staff might interfere with the gear, and vice versa, the practice is to fly the ensign from a halyard rigged amidships on the after part of the superstructure.

              Marconi-rigged sailboats may fly the ensign from the leech of the aftermost sail (or from the back stay), approximately 2/3 the distance up its length. This puts it in about the same position it would occupy if the boat were gaff-rigged.

              At anchor or made fast, the ensign should be flown from the stern staff of all boats. The U.S. national ensign has a 10:19 hoist/fly ratio.
              Tally and Vicki
              "Wickus" Meridian 341
              MMSI 338014939

              Comment


                #9
                Apparently Im not flying my flag correctly either😳
                I say fly your flag wherever you’d like.
                I’m a bad boater, bad boater I say😆
                Dave
                Edmonds, WA
                "THE FIX"
                '93 2556
                Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

                The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                Misc. projects thread
                https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                Comment


                  #10
                  Originally posted by talman View Post
                  Great shots, Kevin. You are a yachtsman. The correct placement for the US flag is never on the bow pulpit, though. Real boaters fly the ensign on the stern. From USPS:

                  The U.S. national ensign, sometimes called "50-star" or "Old Glory," is the proper and preferred flag for all U.S. vessels. Your boat should wear it from 0800 until sunset, and when you enter or leave port during daylight or at night, weather and rig permitting. While in port, if you leave your boat and will not return before sunset, lower and stow the national ensign before you go.

                  The national ensign worn by a vessel must be the flag of her registry—not necessarily that of the owner or operator.

                  Generally, the national ensign should be displayed at the peak of the gaff, i.e., the outer end of the spar extending aft from the mast of your boat—if you boat has a gaff. If it does not, fly it from the flagstaff at your boat's stern. If your boat has an overhanging boom or an outboard motor, your flagstaff may be offset to starboard (preferably) from your boat's centerline.

                  On a sportfishing boat, where a stern staff might interfere with the gear, and vice versa, the practice is to fly the ensign from a halyard rigged amidships on the after part of the superstructure.

                  Marconi-rigged sailboats may fly the ensign from the leech of the aftermost sail (or from the back stay), approximately 2/3 the distance up its length. This puts it in about the same position it would occupy if the boat were gaff-rigged.

                  At anchor or made fast, the ensign should be flown from the stern staff of all boats. The U.S. national ensign has a 10:19 hoist/fly ratio.
                  Hmmm.

                  That is GREAT information. I’ll have to think about moving the flag.

                  KEVIN SANDERS
                  4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                  www.transferswitch4less.com

                  where are we right now?

                  https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

                  Comment


                    #11
                    I fly both a stern and pulpit US flag and guiltily, I normally do not lower them at night. I’m also a bad boy! 😁
                    PS Great shots of beautiful Ak! Personally, I’m just not ready for 30-40* temps and 6 hrs of low hanging sun. It was 90* here in LA the past few days and plenty of sun! Of course I didn’t mention the Santa Ana winds were bowing, there were multiple brush fires, the traffic was horrible and the homeless population is at an all time high! Give and take.
                    Jim Gandee
                    1989 3888
                    Hino 175's
                    Fire Escape
                    [email protected]
                    Alamitos Bay, SoCal

                    Comment

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