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    2556 Owners

    I guess I'll start the new 2556 owners thread being everything from the old one has vanished.
    Feel free to post upgrades or improvements that you'd like to share with other 2556 owners,
    OK to ask questions here too.
    As most of you know mine is a newly "refurbished" 93 2556 Click image for larger version  Name:	image.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	170.7 KB ID:	394360
    Last edited by builderdude; 11-22-2017, 11:00 AM.
    Dave
    Edmonds, WA
    "THE FIX"
    '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
    (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
    The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
    Misc. projects thread
    https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

    #2
    Refurbished is an understatement Dave. All new from the glass hull up is more like it.
    1997 Maxum 2400 SCR 5.7LX Bravo II

    Mike

    Comment


    • builderdude
      builderdude commented
      Editing a comment
      well at least the azz end, thanks Mike

    #3
    Congratulation Dave good to get the owners posting back in motion, have a great Turkey day.
    Slightly modified 2859 6.5 Diesel Bravo III X drive
    96 Dodge 5.9 5 speed Gear vender OD.

    Comment


    • builderdude
      builderdude commented
      Editing a comment
      Back at ya fritz, hope to see your latest upgrades soon

    #4
    EDITED...

    I'm sure reviews of this model has been done many times before, but here is my review based on the 2556 I own..

    I am 57years old and have owned a boat (or boats) all my life since i was 9yrs old... all kinds of boats from dinghys, to 35ft motor yachts.... power boats and sailboats... new and used... boats have always been my passion, and I've learned a little about them over the years and feel I am qualified to give a fair review of the boat, overall..

    The Bayliner 2556 was a great boat in its day, and by the current standard of this size of boats available today, the old 2556 is holding its own and is STILL a more desirable model than 70% of the new boats.

    I am not sure why there is not a manufacture still producing a reasonably affordable, well equipped fiberglass convertible cruiser like the Bayliner 2556 because the market doesn’t seem to have faded...

    Aluminum boats seems to have taken over the small cruiser market, but they don’t have the comfort or the character of a decently built fiberglass boat. I don’t believe they ever will... and still be affordable!


    Over the years the Bayliner Ciera 2556 has been called a trophy, a convertible, and a command bridge. These names seem to be descriptive of the intended market at the time, but the boat itself was so well conceived that it had few physical changes to it thru the years of its production run.

    The early trophy designation would indicate sales were pointed at the fishing market, where as the convertible designation alludes to it being a double-duty family cruiser/fishing boat, and the command bridge is pointing more towards the cruising market.... the early models were trophy's, only one year of 2556 had the “convertible” moniker, and all later ones were called a command bridge.
    there is not a single determining feature that separated a hull with one name from another with the different name..

    when sold new, the 2556 was equipped fairly well for a boat of its size and I believe this was due to bayliner trying to produce a boat that was turn-key in an attempt to make it a more desirable boat with a seemingly better value.
    However well their plan worked for them at the time, I cant say... but these many years later after production ended, with all the competition that has came and went, the 2556 is still ranks as a very comfortable and desirable model.

    the 2556 as it was originally built, was outfitted well for its time and market, and with a beam of 9'6”, it allows for a full sized interior cabin, and still have reasonable side-decks for when going forward to tend to the anchor... it was equipped with the amenities and space to allow the occupants to spend several days (or weeks) afloat cruising in reasonable comfort, yet still be easily trailered to locations where most cruisers with this much comfort would be difficult to take.

    this 2556 I purchased was not even close to great condition, I am now the 3rd owner of it, and the second owner had it for 6 years but no clue as to how to take care of a boat (or even how to use a boat for that matter).... but all the pieces were there and except for the engine and added equipment, it is bone stock without any questionable modifications and holes drilled everywhere as is so often found in well used boats.

    I can only assume that the original owner/buyer of it had more money than time or knowledge of boats, due to its condition (poor) and the way its outfitted (top dollar stuff and lots of it).
    it has all been upgraded with expensive and redundant systems and the engine has been replaced in 2012 with a custom built engine from Motor Works in Spokane Washington
    the interior is in nice condition, and with the exception of the hack job the second owner did to the galley contertop when he replaced the stove, it was clean and original... some of the settee cushions are getting threadbare from use, but no rips, or holes and it still looks good...
    and of course I repaired and resurfaced the countertop due to all the screw holes, and oversized cutout it had for the stove...

    The cabin of these boat has enough wood to make the boat feel warm and “friendly”, and enough fiberglass to make it solid and long lasting with a minimum of care.
    It has storage enough for a couple who use the boat as a weekender, but if one has a desire for longer cruises it can be a bit of a challenge to keep everything organized... but there is a lot of room available that has not been opened up/developed, and when utilized it will nearly double the usable storage space, while making the living space a lot more user friendly and less cluttered.
    ….someone with common sense and tool savvy can easily reclaim this “lost” storage space.

    depending on the size of the kids, the boat can sleep up to a family of 7-8 in the berths, but with grown children or adults, 2 in the v-Berth, 2 in the dinette berth and 1-2 in the quarter berth is more reasonable... but if one wants to sleep on the salon floor, in the cockpit, or up on the floor of the flybridge, it can sleep many more bodies.
    But I must refer to my formula for spending time on ANY boat with more than 2 people... after 2 days, the number of people on the boat, times the number of days spent on the boat, equals a diminishing return on investment.... meaning it starts to become less fun each day one is cooped up on a boat with others, as even a roomy boat can quickly feel like a crowded boat.

    the cockpit has room for 3-4 people standing at the rail fishing.. OR.. 4 deck chairs, and still be able to move about, but 2 deck chairs is more reasonable, but in some cases deck chairs may not be an option... and one still needs room for ice chests and bait buckets..

    it has reasonable access to the engine and basic components (if one considers standing on their head “reasonable”), but one has to question the built in "fish box" that is in the cockpit floor just forward of the engine cover, because its difficult to access when fishing... it DOES have a discharge pump, but no ingress pump or insulation, so any fish you have in there is going to cook from the heat of the engine bay warming the box.. AND as delivered, if you wash the deck down or it rains hard, water will get into it, so its not even a good storage area either...
    but I installed a double bulb seal on the bottom side of the lid/hatch cover so it doesn’t get water in it, and now it stays dry for storage of items that is NOT moisture sensitive....... because, even though water can not be sprayed/splashed into it with the cover on it like it used to, IF water does get in when the cover is off, it WILL NOT evaporate from the space, so mildew or corrosion could develop.
    one could remedy this by cutting ventilation holes in the sides so that it could vent to the under-deck/engine compartment. or a single drain hole to the bilge would help.. or maybe the best idea is to remove the box completely and just use plastic storage bins in the vacant space..

    when we were looking at buying a trailerable cruiser, I originally did not like the shape of the foredeck on the 2556's, but after owning it and using it, I realize it is a thought out design. it allows for head room below, yet giving ample room to work the anchor from the foredeck... and the rode locker is big enough to hold as much chain or rode as you will ever need on a boat of this size.
    the anchor locker is not deep enough to allow the use of a conventional windlass, but a boat this size doesn’t normally carry an anchor so big that it needs a windlass... but for those that need help weighing the anchor, the locker can be made deeper so that a windlass can be used....or, my preference, use a windlass with a capstan or warping drum to help with the pull....

    the side decks (cabin walk-around to foredeck) are reasonably sized with hand rails that are solidly mounted, but I feel they should have been mounted higher for better security when moving fore and aft.
    the cabin is dry in the rain, but can be prone to leak at the rub rail as the boat ages... maintenance every few years may be required to keep it dry, but this is normal with a boat with this type of deck-to-hull fastening.

    When equipped with the sbc 350/5.7 engine, it has been criticized by some as being under powered, and rightfully so if it was intended to be sold as a ski boat.... but it wasn’t.
    As a cruiser/fisher, the 2556 with the 350 engine is reasonable and very adequate for its purpose. But I think anyone will agree that when equipped with the 454/7.4 it becomes a bit more fun.
    I am not aware that any 2556 models were sold on the north American continent with the diesel engine, but it was an option on those sold in some other areas of the world.

    It seems all 2556's, even without any gear on board, has a list slightly to one side or the other... it has been proven by some owners, that some of the boats were counter-ballasted with concrete... so one remedy is to remove the concrete and add batteries as needed... some owners just add more batteries to the light side. that adds more weight to the stern, but the boat can set level this way.
    Due to the stern weight, I feel the OEM 12x12 trim tabs should have been twice that size, 12x24. this would help it get on plane quicker, stay on plane at a lower speed and keep the stern higher with less tab down.. less tab down = less drag... but when underway, the OEM 12x12 tabs do help compensate for the heavy stern and any list the boat may have.

    A peeve of mine here about the OEM installed tabs..... they have wings on them that is supposed to help keep the water trapped under the tab longer, creating more pressure for better lift. the PROBLEM is, the tab mounting surface of the transom is NOT square to the flow/ direction of water flow as the boat moves thru the water, so while the tabs are mounted, the wings are planed inward about 1.25" over the 12” length of them and they create excessive drag.. 4 wings with that much drag can amount to 3-4mph at top speed, and raises the speed at which the boat would be capable of staying on plane at low cruise speed.
    This problem is easily seen when looking under the boat and seeing how the trim tab wings line up with the under body strakes.... they don’t.

    The problem can be remedied by bending the wings out nearly flat with the rest of the tab surface... with the leading edges of the wings very slightly bent upwards so it has a tendency to force the water under the wing even when crossing wakes and turbulent water.
    I did this to mine and it eliminated most of the spray at the back of the boat during high speed operation.. this modification made such a difference that I upgraded to the 12x24 tabs without wings, which took a bit more creativity to install due to the curvature of the transom (long thin fairing plates were needed) and the difference is proof that the winged tabs were the wrong choice for bayliner to install on these boats. GREAT brand of tabs, just the wrong model.

    So after installing the larger 12x24 tabs on my boat, I found there is a nice increase in lift and noticeable difference at top speed.. the lift is really noticeable at lower speeds as it allows the boat stay on plane at a lot lower speed... my boat, with all the gear that I carry, it is considered to be heavily loaded, (7750lbs), and yet will easily remain on plane at least down to 7mph (as of this writing, I haven’t ran it at a lower speed long enough to see exactly at what speed it wants to fall off)..
    the PLUS side to the heavy stern is it allows the boat to ride well on the water. It handles wakes from other boats nicely at any angle, and by adjusting the trim of the outdrive with the trim tabs retracted, it also rides well in a choppy seaway

    all the components, switches, electronics, appliances, etc, that came OEM installed seem to last for a long time with most still in service on most of these 20-25year old boats, so it shows bayliner tried for as much quality as possible at the price point they were offered at...

    all boats have their downsides and even though it seems the 2556 was fairly well thought out and has few inherent problems, if I could redesign a few things on it, it would be to lighten the stern somehow, add a hardtop over the cockpit... and for maintenance purposes, it would have a LARGE full width/length removable cockpit floor, (with the normal engine access and fish box in it), so that when a tank, pump, wiring or other installed item needed attention, the entire floor could be removed to get at stuff.... ironically, all these design changes would ADD weight to the stern...

    overall, my opinion of the 2226 is its a well built, solid, decently outfitted and comfortable boat that has potential for being modified and upgraded into a better and more comfortable cruiser, for the individual, than how it was delivered.

    But of course everyone has a different opinion as to what features are necessary for them to be comfortable, and what size or type of boat they need to have to feel happy with it, but for 2 people who like to trailer their cruiser boat long distances so that they can enjoy boating experiences in different locations, and still carry all their gear, have the storage room, and the weather protection necessary to make every multiple day adventure a success, one will have to look extremely hard and be prepared to spend a lot more money in finding something that compares to the 2556.

    personally, I have never had a desire to own a trailerable boat with a flybridge, because so many of the older boats of this size had so little room or comfort up there, and the platform was so short the helm seats were nearly overhanging the cockpit...then with the extra bit of mechanical up keep required it has never really appealed to me..... And so I wasn’t looking for a flybridge model when I found this boat, but it did all the other features I wanted, so I bought it.... and as much as I still don’t see the need for a flybridge on a boat of this size, I find that I do enjoy the view and the breeze while navigating from there on warm sunny days..


    NU LIBERTE'
    Salem, OR

    1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
    5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
    N2K equipped throughout..
    2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
    2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
    '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
    Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

    Comment


      #5
      Thanks for the write up Centerline!
      I agree it's a fantastic "all around" trailerable fisher/cruiser with plenty of cabin space for very comfortable overnighting.
      I agree with you on the flybridge thing, Ive personally been using It more for storing the crab/prawn traps but like you say when the sun is shinning it's a great place to cruise from.
      I think the later models did quite well with the SBC power because it was coupled to the Bravo drive, I've been very pleased with mine.
      Dave
      Edmonds, WA
      "THE FIX"
      '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
      (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
      The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
      Misc. projects thread
      https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

      Comment


        #6
        Originally posted by Centerline2 View Post
        When equipped with the sbc 350/5.7 it has been critisized by some as being under powered, and rightfully so if it was intended to be sold as a ski boat.... but it wasnt.
        As a cruiser/fisher, the 2556 with the 350 engine is reasonable and very adequate for its purpose. But I think anyone will agree that when equipped with the 454/7.4 it becomes a bit more fun.
        Mine came with a 350 MPI (fuel injected instead of a carb, PO burned out the original 454 when the impeller shredded and he didn't notice), which is just about perfect. Best of both worlds. It has the peak HP of the 454, but the weight of the 350. Only drawback is it's lacking in torque compared to the 454, so takes a bit longer to get up to plane. I'm planning to install a VesselView unit over the winter so I can get exact MPG figures, but based on how many gallons it's taking to refill the tank, it looks like I'm up around 2.1-2.2 MPG (right around 2 NMPG), which from what I gather is what the owners with the carbureted 350 are getting.

        Personally, I am not aware that any 2556 models were sold in the US with a diesel engine, but it was an option on those sold in other countries.
        In one of the 2556 threads (dunno if it made it to the new forums), an owner had a friend who worked at Bayliner at the time these were produced. He reported that the extra weight of the diesel counteracted the improved fuel efficiency, so they sold very few with the diesel. It's probably a different story today with modern lighter weight turbo diesels. And in fact the closest modern boat to a 2556 I've found (Skipjack 262) is frequently sold with a diesel, with owners reporting 3+ MPG at cruise, up to 5 MPG at slower speeds (trolling).

        the only negative to the 2556 is its a bit heavy in the stern and there is little that can be done about it, other than stow all the gear as far forward as is practical.
        When under way its not as much of an issue, as the 12x12 bennett trim tabs give adequate lift to allow the boat to plane with a good attitude and trim... but after installing the larger 12x24 tabs, I found there is a nice increase in in lift and a bit in top speed, and the lift is really noticeable at lower speeds and still have the boat remain on plane... my boat, with all the gear that I carry, is considered to be heavily loaded, and yet will easily remain on plane at least down to 7mph (I havent ran it lower long enough to see exactly at what speed it falls off)..
        Whoa, I'm going to have to look into getting the larger tabs. Mine falls off plane at about 12 knots, with 15 knots being a more reasonable minimum (doesn't fall off plane when it hits swells). I've been pulling my hair out because I want to troll at around 7 knots, but hull speed for the boat is around 6.3 knots, meaning I'm burning a lot more fuel at 7 knots. I had no idea you could get the boat to plane at those speeds.
        1994 2556, 350 MAG MPI Horizon, Bravo 2

        Comment


          #7
          Originally posted by Solandri View Post

          Whoa, I'm going to have to look into getting the larger tabs. Mine falls off plane at about 12 knots, with 15 knots being a more reasonable minimum (doesn't fall off plane when it hits swells). I've been pulling my hair out because I want to troll at around 7 knots, but hull speed for the boat is around 6.3 knots, meaning I'm burning a lot more fuel at 7 knots. I had no idea you could get the boat to plane at those speeds.
          my boat, on the trailer weighs 9550lbs, minus 1800lbs for the trailer (as stated on its mfg's tag), would leave the boat weight at 7750lbs... and at 7mph by the gps, it will remain on plane thru normal turns on flat water.... I have tried some tighter turns and still remained on plane, but as I was over propped at the time, I didnt work it as hard as I would have liked.
          i dont know what it will do in swells or a following sea, but as much as i know about a following sea, running at that speed it can be unsafe to run tabs... more speed is needed.



          NU LIBERTE'
          Salem, OR

          1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
          5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
          N2K equipped throughout..
          2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
          2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
          '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
          Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

          Comment


            #8
            Do what dave did and remove the concrete in the stern area. Lighten up that back end considerably.

            it sounds like you werent really looking for a flybridge model........did you look at a 2859? Bit wider beam and a bit longer. Sleeps 6 and has a great layout for staying out for a few weeks at a time and great for sportfishing with lots of room out back and the kneeboard height is great. Feels very safe out back when your fishing. And its still trailerable.
            Doug
            1995 2859 -extensively rebuilt/restored 2016/17
            496 big block - Bravo ll leg
            The Doghouse
            Prince George BC

            Comment


              #9
              I'm so glad I removed the concrete!
              NADA has dry weight at just under 5700 lbs for the 2556, me thinks that was probably SBC powered & raw water cooled. Doubt the concrete was factored in
              I can't seem to get aluminum heads and stainless exhaust outa my head to make the weight even better.
              Dave
              Edmonds, WA
              "THE FIX"
              '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
              (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
              The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
              Misc. projects thread
              https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

              Comment


                #10
                Lol! Aluminum heads, exhaust and intake on the 7.4 was good for approx 200lbs over cast iron! Significant!
                Doug
                1995 2859 -extensively rebuilt/restored 2016/17
                496 big block - Bravo ll leg
                The Doghouse
                Prince George BC

                Comment


                  #11
                  Originally posted by Solandri View Post
                  Mine came with a 350 MPI , it looks like I'm up around 2.1-2.2 MPG (right around 2 NMPG), which from what I gather is what the owners with the carbureted 350 are getting.
                  my carbed 350/5.7 is getting right at 1nmpg @ cruise speed... if I come off plane and run at a fast idle (800 850rpm), my floscan says 5.5nmpg.... and thats with the tabs full down, as this helps keep the wandering to a minimum.... I would like to have the time to actually test the mpg at the slower speed, as that is quite a savings if one has a few extra hours to spare while making a passage...

                  as for the concrete, it is my understanding that if it is "installed", it will be found in the port side.... my boat has almost a 2 inch list to starboard, and if I remove ballast from the port side it will only make the list to starboard worse....

                  I suppose I could drill test holes and probe the area's with a steel rod or bore scope to see what is in the spaces on each side... it would be sweet if I DID have concrete in the starboard side, as removing it would solve the list while lightening the boat... but if I find concrete in the port side, it will have to stay there until I can figure out how to minimize the list...

                  and I will agree with builderdude that the SBC with either the volvo or the merc behind it, has better performance than the power robbing cobra drive... with less drive issues.
                  I have the cobra drive, but so far Ive had no issues with it, and as soon as i do, it will promptly be upgraded......



                  NU LIBERTE'
                  Salem, OR

                  1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
                  5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
                  N2K equipped throughout..
                  2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
                  2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
                  '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
                  Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

                  Comment


                    #12
                    If you remove the concrete you do have to move batteries from the starboard side and move them to port and if you have a kicker it needs to be port side also.

                    it takes some rebalancing to make it work. But in the end its alot of weight off the stern where these boats dont need it!
                    Doug
                    1995 2859 -extensively rebuilt/restored 2016/17
                    496 big block - Bravo ll leg
                    The Doghouse
                    Prince George BC

                    Comment


                      #13
                      Yes I did consider the 2859. I actually liked the layout of it better, but I crossed it off the list because it only has a 15 degree deadrise angle (the 2556 is 18.5 deg). I didn't feel that was sufficient for taking the boat as far offshore as I wanted. (The 2855 has 21.5 deg I believe, but it really hurts fuel economy and the cockpit seemed too small.)

                      The 7 knots is due to the captain being impatient, not due to the fish biting better (although I hear they do). I thought 5 knots would be fine for trolling, which it is. The problem is I just feel like it takes too long to cover ground at that speed. If I'm doing a lawnmower pattern or I see birds diving up ahead that I want to get to, I just get impatient with how long it takes at 5 knots. So it wasn't something I could've foreseen before buying the boat.

                      I plan to drill a hole this winter to check for concrete. My batteries are already on the port side, as well as the kicker, and I'm adding a bait tank to the port side as well. So losing weight from the port side would actually be good.
                      1994 2556, 350 MAG MPI Horizon, Bravo 2

                      Comment


                        #14
                        Solandri, curious if the gear ratio was changed in your B2 going from a BBC to a SBC. What ratio is it currently and what prop type and pitch you running?
                        Dave
                        Edmonds, WA
                        "THE FIX"
                        '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
                        (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
                        The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                        Misc. projects thread
                        https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                        Comment


                          #15
                          Originally posted by sketch96 View Post
                          If you remove the concrete you do have to move batteries from the starboard side and move them to port and if you have a kicker it needs to be port side also.

                          it takes some rebalancing to make it work. But in the end its alot of weight off the stern where these boats dont need it!
                          the batts are already on the port side and so is the kicker bracket... i suppose if the kicker was installed, the boat may sit on a bit better trim... but I still dont know if there is concrete, and it doesnt look like anyone has ever opened either side... has it been found in ALL 2556 models that have been checked for it?


                          NU LIBERTE'
                          Salem, OR

                          1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
                          5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
                          N2K equipped throughout..
                          2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
                          2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
                          '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
                          Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

                          Comment


                          • builderdude
                            builderdude commented
                            Editing a comment
                            I looked in both the starboard and port side boxes for concrete, only in the port side on my 93. Earlier models had things layed out a bit different, the bridge ladder and fridge for example.
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