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Differences between cruising in a RV Vs a Boat

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  • Steadfast70
    replied
    Boating and RVing offer completely different joys. They each come with their particular challenges. I love both and do both. If I had to pick between them at my present age I would pick the boat. But I would then miss the joys in RV world.

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  • TX H210 SS
    commented on 's reply
    Hmmmmm....the boat floats way better imo That would be a nightmare.

    The GMC models from the 70s are front wheel drive powered by 455 Rocket motors. Not rated to tow anything though, but really sweet looking rides.

    The ramps i go to are nowhere near wide enough to sling that setup around to back in.

  • builderdude
    commented on 's reply
    Some people really struggle at the boat launch 🤣

  • green650
    replied
    Wonder if they told this guy it was easy too!




    Click image for larger version

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  • Jeffw
    replied
    Launching a boat with a motorhome is easy! With that huge rear overhang, the back tires don't even get wet.

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  • TX H210 SS
    replied
    The State parks at the lake here have limited number of reserve spots for RVs...the rest are all first come first serve. You can call and see how many are available but if theres only a few ya better step on the long pedal.

    I've hauled the RV to the lake on a wednesday after work before then come back to work until towing the boat up, just to make sure I had our favorite spot.

    Would sure like to find an affordable old school GMC motorhome with the tandem rear wheels and all the windows....come retirement time I would love to start hitting the college bowl games and make the MLB stadium circuit. Just wish there was a way to tow the boat with one and manage the launch without turning the rv into a houseboat

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  • JThiessen
    commented on 's reply
    Maybe you’ve stumbled on an untapped.market niche’ here:
    Towable boat “trailers”!!!

  • ksanders
    replied
    Originally posted by talman View Post
    Kevin, scratch one thing off your list. This is a game changer on the dock. The evenings extend longer, and friends hang out longer.Click image for larger version

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    Very cool!!!

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  • builderdude
    commented on 's reply
    Yikes! Not recommended close to the ferry lane, remember that video?🤣

  • talman
    replied
    Kevin, scratch one thing off your list. This is a game changer on the dock. The evenings extend longer, and friends hang out longer.Click image for larger version

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    Leave a comment:


  • Iproff
    replied
    Gas for my tow vehicle is less per gallon than my boat. I get a gallon a mile in my boat each motor. My truck gets 13 miles to the gallon towing my trailer.
    I can load my trailer at home in my driveway, the boat I have to load the truck drive to the marina and carry everything 300 yards to my slip.
    An RV can have slides to expand your living or sleeping area.
    An RV can have an outside kitchen.
    I can travel to all the lower 48 states and all the provinces.
    I don't have to worry about engines in my travel trailer, I can upgrade my tow vehicle and keep the same RV.
    When the wife gets under my skin I can go for a walk. I can take my 10 foot zodiac and motor with me in the RV.
    I can use the RV all year round, my boating season is May to October in Ontario.
    As Jeff said no monthly slip fees like the boat has.
    While I like both, going from a boat to an RV just seems like a natural progression. Boating teaches you to store items and to be picky what you need to take verses what you want to take.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffw
    replied
    We pick up and go all the time, but we've been doing this for over 20 years. We seldom stay in fancy RV parks, mom 'n pops are our favorites. We usually only use those for full hookups, average once a week, not on weekends if possible.

    We stay at friends and family's driveways or park in front when we can, we're everybody's favorite house guests, because we bring our own house. We're Elks club members and stay there, usually our first choice. Walmart is for overnight sleep stops or bad weather necessity.

    We usually only make reservations at places that we want to visit at certain times, with little flexibility in our schedule. If you're still working and have limited travel time, then yes, you probably need reservations, especially during peak travel/tourist seasons. Many more tricks you learn as you go, same as boating!

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  • JThiessen
    replied
    Originally posted by ksanders View Post
    Having recently spent our first time ever in a RV lets talk about differences between the two experiences.



    Things that are better in a RV.

    You can reserve a slip in advance at most state parks
    I'd suggest that this is actually a downside - You HAVE to reserve in advance.......at least here in the PNW, just picking up and going at the last minute is now almost impossible unless you tent.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim_Gandee
    replied
    I’ll add a different twist in that I hate driving on the highway! Traffic, knucklehead drivers, stuck behind trucks, etc. RVing is pretty low on my list thus I’m saving that for when I’m to old to fly or boat.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffw
    replied
    Originally posted by courtjester View Post
    kevin wrote: with my comments


    Things that are better in a boat...

    First off my 4788 is WAY bigger than a RV. agreed
    Maneuvering a large boat is much easier than maneuvering a large RV not hardly. Wind can move a boat when you don't want to move. Putting the brakes on our RV makes it STOP. course the boat turns sharper, but I can put our motorhome in any spot it will fit.
    My boat is MUCH more self sufficient. We desalinate our own water, overboard grey water, and where legal treat our sewage. All we need is diesel fuel and food. In even the biggest RV you are two sets of showers away from needing to find a dump station. Mostly agree.
    Finding a place to spend the night is as easy as finding a protected cove and dropping the hook. If you pull into a harbor they almost always have transient space, and you are almost guaranteed to not have any liveaboard neighbors. I kind of disagree. When I'm traveling to races, my motorhome and trailer are 65' long. I can ALWAYS find a place easily. Walmart certainly not as picturesque as a nice cove, but they're everywhere and it takes about 10 seconds to park and do whatever else I want. Even putting out slides and stablizers only takes a minute. I suppose if its about the journey, boating is better, but if its about getting somewhere and all you're doing is stopping for the night, its no contest, rv wins in a landslide.

    Things that are better in a RV.

    You are not walking to the grocery store. true
    There are not any days you cannot travel mostly true
    If it’s cruddy weather you can move to where its nice weather in a day mostly true
    You can reserve a slip in advance at most state parks true
    You can step out of your RV and not have to swim very true
    Campfires some times
    Places to stop are not a hundred miles apart, they are just a few minutes apart.true
    You can go inland very true


    Anybody want to add to the list?

    I find it a bit easier socializing in an rv setting, I suppose if you're tied up at a dock its the same.
    I also think that overall, being on a boat is way more relaxing than an RV.
    On the other hand, I get way better mileage in my rv than my boat.
    I can also see a lot more different territory in my rv in a given period of time.
    Easier going for a hike from an RV.


    I enjoy both. If I had to pick, it would likely be the boat, but not by much.
    Toni hit it right on the head IMO. We enjoy both too, but if I HAD to choose, I'd go with the motorhome, which we prefer over any trailer, but that's a different discussion. Traveling in a motorhome is cheaper, at least for us. My boat slip and diver are $800 a month, the RV costs nothing in this category, assuming the slip is storage, and I keep the RV at home. Insurance is $63 more per year for the RV, but it's 19 years newer and valued 2.5 times as much, so pretty even here. A boat wash is $60, RV @$45. The boat is washed monthly, the RV, when necessary, I'd guess 6 times a year. I get 9+ mpg in the RV, towing a 4,000 lb. car, probably 4-5 times better than the boat, and diesel is almost always cheaper on land. Servicing each, well the boat has two engines, so just call it twice as much. Tara and I have been together for 22+ years, and we've RV traveled a good 250,000 miles, 49 states and 5 provinces, And we still have a bunch of places to visit. This continent can be as big or small as you want! And yes, the Pacific is far larger, but not nearly as accessible. I think we're limited to coastal cruising by capacities, oh yeah, and experience...

    Leave a comment:

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