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Lose or loose.-gctid810900

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    Lose or loose.-gctid810900

    Loose------Not tight.

    Lose-------Can't find.

    The words loose and lose are mixed up in writing; for some reason, many people write loose when they really mean lose. But there's no reason to lose your mind worrying about this, just lose the extra o! Loose is an adjective, the opposite of tight or contained. Lose is a verb that means to suffer the loss of, to miss.
    Started boating 1955
    Number of boats owned 32
    Bayliners
    2655
    2755
    2850
    3870 presently owned
    Favorite boat. Toss up. 46' Chris Craft, 3870 Bayliner

    #2
    Lots of writing is really screwed up today, most can easily be blamed on the spell correctors which are not yet up to par in most cases but have gotten much better over the years. I have reread several of my posts on various sites only to find a bunch of incorrectly spelled or wrong words the computer decided it preferred because of my fat finger. At the end of the day the important part is to be understood which we all seem to achieve no matter how well we spell.
    Cheers, Hans
    2007 Carver 41 CMY
    Twin Volvo D6-370
    Montreal, Canada
    Midnight Sun I Photos

    Comment


      #3
      The way the English language is being rewritten, we could easily see, "We loost the game." :unsure:

      Take farther and further. For as long as I can remember, you furthered your education by going to a college farther away. Even Merriam Webster has redefined farther to include further. Now your college could be further away. However, they haven't changed further with farther; there is no such thing as farthering your education. :blink:
      "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
      MMSI: 367637220
      HAM: KE7TTR
      TDI tech diver
      BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
      Kevin

      Comment


        #4
        Linguistic humor, The English lesson

        We'll begin with box, and the plural is boxes;

        But the plural of ox should be oxen, not oxes.

        Then one fowl is goose, but two are called geese,

        Yet the plural of moose should never be meese.

        You may find a lone mouse or a nest full of mice,

        Yet the plural of house is houses, not hice.

        If the plural of man is always called men,

        Why shouldn't the plural of pan be called pen?

        The cow in the plural may be cows or kine,

        But the plural of vow is vows, not vine.

        I speak of my foot and show you my feet,

        If I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet?

        If one is a tooth, and a whole set are teeth,

        Why shouldn't the plural of booth be called beeth?

        If the singular is this and the plural is these,

        Why shouldn't the plural of kiss be named kese?

        Then one may be that, and three may be those,

        Yet the plural of hat would never be hose;

        We speak of a brother, and also of brethren,

        But though we say mother, we never say methren.

        The masculine pronouns are he, his and him,

        But imagine the feminine she, shis, and shim!

        So our English, I think, you all will agree,

        Is the craziest language you ever did see.

        I take it you already know

        Of tough and bough and cough and dough?

        Others may stumble, but not you,

        On hiccough, thorough, slough, and through?

        Well done! And now you wish, perhaps

        To learn of less familiar traps?

        Beware of heard, a dreadful word,

        That looks like beard and sounds like bird.

        And dead; it's said like bed, not bead;

        For goodness sake, don't call it deed!

        Watch out for meat and great and threat;

        They rhyme with suite and straight and debt.

        A moth is not a moth in mother,

        Nor both in bother, broth in brother.

        And here is not a match for there,

        Or dear and fear for bear and pear.

        And then there's dose and rose and lose,

        Just look them up, and goose and choose.

        And cork and work and card and ward,

        And font and front and word and sword.

        And do and go, then thwart and cart.

        Come, come, I've hardly made a start.

        A dreadful language? Why, man alive,

        I'd learned to talk it when I was five,

        And yet to write it, the more I tried,

        I hadn't learned it at fifty-five!
        1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
        twin 454's
        MV Mar-Y-Sol
        1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
        Twin chevy 350's inboard
        Ben- Jamin
        spokane Washington

        Comment


          #5
          Yachtman,

          I compliment you for the fine prose that you sent, it will complement the others in my collection!

          Enjoy!
          Retired, computer expert / executive
          Bayliner 285 Cruiser / Mercruiser QSD 4.2L 320 HP Diesel
          Live in the Bay Area, CA, USA, boat in Turkey
          D-Marin @ Turgutreis in Bodrum/Turkey
          [email protected]
          [email protected]

          Comment


            #6
            "MonteVista" post=810941 wrote:
            Yachtman,

            I compliment you for the fine prose that you sent, it will complement the others in my collection!

            Enjoy!
            I.didnt write it but have seen it many times. So true what it says. My wife is from Peru she struggles with the English
            1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
            twin 454's
            MV Mar-Y-Sol
            1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
            Twin chevy 350's inboard
            Ben- Jamin
            spokane Washington

            Comment

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