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12v Converter 1977 30 FT Bayliner twin Volvos-gctid467437

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    12v Converter 1977 30 FT Bayliner twin Volvos-gctid467437

    What is the job of the Converter should it also be able to keep the battery's charged.How should it be wired? Any suggestions as to where I can find information on this boat's electronics.

    #2
    Treadwellf wrote:
    What is the job of the Converter should it also be able to keep the battery's charged. How should it be wired? Any suggestions as to where I can find information on this boat's electronics.
    You may be able to find a schematic showing the OEM hull and engine wiring, but you will very likely not find anything showing any schematics for "Electronics".

    This boat has no doubt undergone many changes in 35 years or so.

    As for a Charger/Converter..... Captn Harv can answer that question for you.

    I'm thinking that this is a battery charger/converter combination.

    IMO, charger leads should connect to your rear MBSS terminals #1 and #2 that correspond with the battery banks intended to be charged.

    This prevents unwanted direct battery connections, and yet is schematically identical.

    .
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

    Comment


      #3
      Hey Treadwellf . . . . welcome to the puddle . . . I, too, have an inverter/charger (Xantrex HF1800) and I am still learning about how to wire (don't think my PO {previous owner} knew what he was doing with it) and where everything needs to be connected to, etc. etc. . .. . here's CaptHarv's article that will help you (it's in a group of items known as the "BOC Library" down towards the bottom on the main page) and the whole library is FULL of good stuff . . .

      http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...-Inverters-101

      I can give you some of the basics:

      1) the charger portion of your unit accepts 110 (120)V power from SP (shore power) or from a generator (don't even think of installing a genny in the engine spaces unless it's a marine unit, way more "involved" than you'd ever think and will illicit "facepalms" from many on the Board) and uses that supplied power to charge your batteries - how many batteries and how many banks depends on the unit. Most of the newer ones use "smart charging" which is a the current stepped approach to charging so you don't overcharge. This is where your charging cables (hopefully, just two) would connect to your MBSS (master battery selector switch) on posts #1 and #2 and this assumes that you have starting batts (normally connect to post #1) and house batts (normally connect to post #2) . . . . . remember, you are only charging your batteries when you are plugged into shore power or are powering the unit with a generator.

      2) the inverter portion takes the 12V DC current stored in your house batts and converts it to 110V AC current for use with well, almost anything that you use at home that requires a normal house plug (fans, TVs, computer/cell phone chargers , etc.)

      That's it in a very small nutshell. If you haven't purchased the unit yet, I would rather buy a sine wave output unit (I'm going against the grain by saying that . . . according to some or many posters). I just think it is a smarter purchase if you don't have one already but you say that your boat is a 1977 so I figure it's probably a "done deal" in that category.

      Be sure to calculate the amps that you'll need to use (especially, if you're going to stay out on the hook for any length of time) so that you're unit (inverter/charger) AND the house battery size are compatible with your needs. Understand that there limits to how low you can take the house batts charge (the start batts charge too) before you'll start damaging the life of the batteries and also so that you don't wake up to dead batteries in the morning . . . not a good deal. . .. :banghead

      You can also use solar or wind power units to help keep your batteries charged . . . but that's another posting. Otherwise, while your boat engines are running, you're charging your batts but you need to understand which engine is charging what and that's where a good wiring diagram would come in . . . . I just had to crawl down there and start drawing before I could figure mine out! . . . . finding new stuff every day . .

      Post back on here again if you have more questions. These guys are full of . . . . well, information:right and love to give it out!! . . . . the information that is . . . .
      1998 Avanti 3685 - "Dad's Dream" w 454 Mercs - for sale - Dredge Harbor, NJ
      Former - "Home Aweigh" 2003 - 2452 Bayliner Cierra Classic Hardtop Cruiser
      WQQM835 MMSI: 338147209
      James H. Stradling

      Comment


        #4
        Jim, I think that he's refering to this as a "Converter", not necessarily an "Inverter".

        In 1977, a Converter or a Charger/Converter, was a fairly common item for this size hull.

        Treadwellf wrote:
        What is the job of the Converter should it also be able to keep the battery's charged. How should it be wired?
        .
        Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
        2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
        Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
        Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
        Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

        Comment

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