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    #16
    Hi Rick,

    Thanks so much for taking the time to respond and typing out that detailed analysis. I'm sure we all appreciate you sharing your professional knowledge with us. I admit I'm not the most mechanically inclined person out there so I apologize if my statement was misleading. When I asked "don't I need to drain the antifreeze from the engine itself" I wasn't referring to the engine cooling system. I know for a fact that its not a CCS but rather a Raw Water Cooling system. What I was referring to was item no.8 on that list which says "Added -50 BanFrost 2000 Engine Flush + filled block and manifolds." My thought was since he filled the block and manifolds with BanFrost, I'd have to somehow drain that out prior to starting the engine in spring. Isn't that the case?

    Cyrus

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      #17
      Cyrus wrote:
      ............ What I was referring to was item no.8 on that list which says "Added -50 BanFrost 2000 Engine Flush + filled block and manifolds." My thought was since he filled the block and manifolds with BanFrost, I'd have to somehow drain that out prior to starting the engine in spring. Isn't that the case?
      Cyrus,

      1.... if the antifreeze did not become diluted by any residual sea water, it should protect your expensive cast iron parts.

      However, I'd not risk leaving this in for the winter.... your call.

      2.... if the antifreeze is non-toxic, you could simply start the engine and let it go out the exhaust.

      .
      Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
      2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
      Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
      Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
      Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

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        #18
        Very difficult to give you tips on commissioning since there are so many methods that may have been used to winterize. I would speak to the mechanic/shop that did the work just to be sure as they usually have a "system" they use which very well may differ from the marina across the road. In my case, everything is ready to go as soon as I reconnect the battery cables. Yours may have been left with hoses or plugs unconnected or god knows what else. Regardless on what you end up doing, first thing is to open the engine hatch as soon as it hits the water to see if any water is coming in. Then start the engine and immediately check for water. If everything is fine and only then do you disconnect from the trailer. So far I have never had to pull her out after hitting the water.
        Cheers, Hans
        2007 Carver 41 CMY
        Twin Volvo D6-370
        Montreal, Canada
        Midnight Sun I Photos

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          #19
          Noted. I'll call the mechanic and have a chat with him before I de-winterize. Thank you sirs.

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            #20
            For my own purposes during winterization, I've decided that all hoses get reconnected after draining during winterization, particularly the big "J" hose between the t-stat housing and circulation pump. A while back I discovered a squirrel had gotten into the cooling system and packed acorns into the engine circulation pump and J hose. It created quite a mess and a lot of flushing, including taking the risers, manifolds, water pump, etc... off to get everything out. Mice/voles etc... can crawl through some impressively small holes (like the size of your pinky). Plenty of people talk about mice etc... getting on to their boats, so I think eliminating sources of temptation is important too.

            The other thing I would suggest, if someone is going to use non toxic antifreeze is to "go all the way" and get the -100F stuff. It basically doesn't cost any/much more than the -50F. And at least here in North America, we can get close to or exceed -50F temps. I personally use the -100F stuff, but I also still drain it immediately after filling anyway. I basically just use it more as a flushing method to get rid of any other residual water that didn't completely drain already. I prefer the "air doesn't freeze" method, and with my raw water cooling system, I leave it completely drained through the winter.

            The original poster will probably want to replace spark plugs too. The mechanic's list doesn't mention anything about plugs, and rightfully so because there wouldn't be much to do with them during winterization. But for de-winterization, I like to replace the plugs AFTER I've fired up the engine and ran it for a bit. I don't want to use the new plugs to burn off any fogging oil.

            There are other things that can be done too (or at least inspected) that could be considered general maintenance, but de-winterization-time becomes a good opportunity to check things like condition of the gas lines (filler hose, vent, and gas lines from tank to engine). The hoses will have date codes on them--if they are original, replace them. The fuel-related hoses actually REQUIRE replacement after so many years anyway (at least here in the U.S.) and you can get fined by the Coast Guard if they catch you.

            Did the mechanic do anything with the outdrive as part of winterization? How about the fuel filter, or inspection of fluid levels (e.g. power steering).

            And regardless of what the mechanic says, I would recheck all hose clamps for tightness, even if he reinstalled them already. It's always possible he forgot to tighten something. I've personally experienced this before when all the power steering fluid dumped out. The person that winterized the boat (which was NOT me at the time) forgot to tighten the clamps on the power steering lines at the cooler under the engine. A red bilge looks really creepy.

            Please don't let all of this overwhelm you though. Winterization and recommissioning really aren't all that hard. But there are certainly many opinions on how to do it, so it can be challenging to decide what to do. When in doubt, refer to the OEM manual. But I think at least some people will agree, even an OEM manual isn't all encompassing or "the best."

            P.S. unless I'm missing something, your mechanic didn't appear to have changed the engine oil/filter? this is one of the first steps for winterization, as you will want the engine to sit through winter with the internals coated in nice new clean oil. It also means you DON'T have to do it first thing in the spring.

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              #21
              Optimus wrote:


              I prefer the "air doesn't freeze" method, and with my raw water cooling system, I leave it completely drained through the winter.

              When in doubt, refer to the OEM manual. But I think at least some people will agree, even an OEM manual isn't all encompassing or "the best."

              P.S. unless I'm missing something, your mechanic didn't appear to have changed the engine oil/filter? this is one of the first steps for winterization, as you will want the engine to sit through winter with the internals coated in nice new clean oil. It also means you DON'T have to do it first thing in the spring.
              Good points.

              Ditto the "air doesn't freeze" comment.

              The OEM instructions will generally omit fogging into both priamary throttle bores in order to get both planes of the intake manifold.

              Miss one plane, or an uneven solution into each plane, and you leave out four cylinders or unevenly protect all cylinders.

              Ditto changing the oil and running the engine as part of the winterizing.

              None of this has to do with re-commissioning, but are good points to be aware of.

              .
              Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
              2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
              Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
              Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
              Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

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