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Bought a 2000 Ciera 2855 - Now have some questions!-gctid351193

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    Bought a 2000 Ciera 2855 - Now have some questions!-gctid351193

    First post here. You guys seem very knowledgeable and Im sure you will be able to help my wife and I figure out how to get the most enjoyment from our new summer toy!! We havent taken deelivery of the boat but the transaction is complete.

    I have a few questions:

    1. Does my boat have a water heater? If so, where is it located? does it automatically fill itself and heat water when the boat has shore power? Is it necessary to drain it after use? Is there a breaker or switches somewhere to power the water heater?

    2. Regarding the batteries: We like to crank up the radio and throw anchor and go for a swim on the many sandbars on our lake. With the radio turned up for hours at a time, interior lights on, etc, are we going to risk draining the batteries to the point the engine wont start? I guess my main question here would be "are the two batteries separate (one starting battery and one accessory battery)"?

    3. How does the holding tank system work? Do I need to treat the holding tank(s) as you would with RV tanks? Are there valves or pumps that need to be opened or closed in order to use the toilet, shower, sink, etc? On the other end of the deal, are there any valves or pumps needed to operate when we pump out at the marina? How can I be certain these systems are operating properly before using them?

    Sorry for the lengthy post. Im like a sponge trying to absorb as much knowledge as possible! The less stressful our time is spent on the boat, the better!!

    #2
    Your water heater should be in the engine compartment-it's a square white? box around 24" square, it fills from your fresh water tank.

    It runs off of shore power and may have the ability to heat from the engine when under way. There should be a breaker on the main control panel.

    You don't need to drain it until haul out in the fall when you winterize the water system. if you have the owner manual it will tell you if you don't you can get one from Bayliners website.

    You should also have a bttery switch to seperate the batteries. It will have a 1, 2, & both position, use one battery (house) for starting only-cranking battery and one for lights, radio etc, it should be a deep cycle battery. Switch should be set for the house battery when not under way, then switch back to the cranking to start the engine.

    If you have just a black water tank that is for the toilet only all other water goes overboard unless you have a grey water holding tank.

    Black water tank is usually in the engine room and you should get a treatment for it-check with your local marine supply for recommended brands or someone here will suggest a brand.

    This tank requires a pump out and usually is done at a marina, most waterways do not allow dumping the holding tank anymore.

    The marina will help you through the pump out procedure.

    Hope I answered all your questions but if not don't hesitate to ask more.

    Comment


      #3
      RMSLCC: You omly need an owner's manual supplement for that 285. Our last boat was a 2005 285. A nice boat, the only problems that we had were 3 or 4 seawater pumps that wiped-out and caused overheat alarms. Sea tow came to the rescue. Have fun with yours. Griff

      Comment


        #4
        Welcome to BOC.

        You plcked a nice boat - loved ours, but it was too fast. I had the 7.4MPI with the Bravo 3.

        If this is your setup, be advised that they go through zincs at an alarming rate. 1.3 mpg was the best fuel consumption I could get as well.

        There were two slightly different 2855's made in 2000. The early edition was like the pre-2000 models and the later edition is like the 2001+ models.

        Your HW tank is in the engine bay, on the port side. The batteries are behind the water tank towards the stern. The control switch for the batteries is on the prt side at the stern, inside the stern storage compartment.

        As others have mentioned, download the owners manual from the Bayliner website.

        And turn your fu**ing music down.

        Comment


          #5
          freedre wrote:
          Welcome to BOC.

          You plcked a nice boat - loved ours, but it was too fast. I had the 7.4MPI with the Bravo 3.

          If this is your setup, be advised that they go through zincs at an alarming rate. 1.3 mpg was the best fuel consumption I could get as well.

          There were two slightly different 2855's made in 2000. The early edition was like the pre-2000 models and the later edition is like the 2001+ models.

          Your HW tank is in the engine bay, on the port side. The batteries are behind the water tank towards the stern. The control switch for the batteries is on the prt side at the stern, inside the stern storage compartment.

          As others have mentioned, download the owners manual from the Bayliner website.

          And turn your fu**ing music down.
          "music down"

          Mine is the later edition 2000. I got an outstanding deal on the boat and it runs great! It does have the 7.4 with bravo3. I was talking to the mechanic that has been servicing the boat for the previous owner and he informed me that the zinc anode was replaced last year but should be good for several more years in fresh water. The boat only has 150 hours on it. We will be spending a large portion of our time on the boat using it in the slip like a floating hotel plugged into shore power. I doubt we will put 20 or 30 hours per year on it considering the size of our lake and our planned usage frequency.

          I downloaded the manual from bayliner and the whole thing. It answered all my questions except for locations of seacocks. Where are the seacocks for the Air Conditioner, Toilet, and engine? The previous owner has never messed with the seacocks so I assume he has left them open year round.

          I read about the battery switch. Is it wise to flip it to "both" when the boat is under way so both batteries will charge? I read where when plugged into shore power the selector needs to be on 1 or 2 but not both.

          "music up"

          Comment


            #6
            LOL

            The seacock for the head (toilet) is under the stairs. The one for the holding tank is on the port side of the engine. There is no seacock for the engine. Didn't have A/C so don't know about that one.

            I had battery #1 as the start battery and #2 as the house battery. Start in postion 1, run in "Both" and place at #2 when anchored or charging at the dock.

            My comments about the zincs was for salt water - don't know about fresh.

            Comment


              #7
              We have a 1996 2855 and love it. Check the vents for your gas tank and (sepecially) the black water tank. The first time we spent a weekend on the boat was the first time we used the toilet to any significant degree. Day 2 my wife complained that it was getting hard to flush. Indeed, flushing the toliet felt like pumping air into an over-inflated tire. Just to check, started unscrewing the "waste" fitting where you would normally pump out. After unscrewing the cover about a half-turn, I heard air escaping. My wife said, "Just open it all the way!" Right then a lot of nasty sewage started squirting out, and I hastily screwed the thing back down.

              After hosing off and giving the matter a little thought, I realized that the reason pumpouts work is that the connection is at the bottom of the tank, and releasing a lot of pent-up pressure from the pump-out fitting will bring just a wee bit of air followed by a lot of sewage. I then uncoupled the vent line from the vent though-hull to successfully vent the holding tank. The following week I again removed the vent line and had to use pressuriozed air from the outside to clear the built-up crud in the small vent fitting. I've heard people say spiders leave nests or something in there.

              This year I plan to replace the gas and waste tank through-hulls with new ones, as mine are looking pretty worn. Enjoy your boat! Rob

              Comment


                #8
                RMSLLC wrote:
                "music down"

                Mine is the later edition 2000. I got an outstanding deal on the boat and it runs great! It does have the 7.4 with bravo3. I was talking to the mechanic that has been servicing the boat for the previous owner and he informed me that the zinc anode was replaced last year but should be good for several more years in fresh water. The boat only has 150 hours on it. We will be spending a large portion of our time on the boat using it in the slip like a floating hotel plugged into shore power. I doubt we will put 20 or 30 hours per year on it considering the size of our lake and our planned usage frequency.

                I downloaded the manual from bayliner and the whole thing. It answered all my questions except for locations of seacocks. Where are the seacocks for the Air Conditioner, Toilet, and engine? The previous owner has never messed with the seacocks so I assume he has left them open year round.

                I read about the battery switch. Is it wise to flip it to "both" when the boat is under way so both batteries will charge? I read where when plugged into shore power the selector needs to be on 1 or 2 but not both.

                "music up"
                Zincs can last longer in fresh water but it depends on the type of "zincs" you use, how long the boat stays in the water and whether there is any current leakage at the dock where you use shore power. If you trailer your boat and keep it out of the water except during the boating season the zincs will last longer. If you leave the boat in the water all the time they will get eaten up quickly.

                Zincs are pretty cheap and easy to replace. here's a link on http://"http://www.defender.com/html...he right zincs

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks for all the replies! Good information!! Im still trying to locate the seacock for the A/C. I am 2 hours from my boat so I will look harder next time we are over there.

                  Another question:

                  How does the stove work? I read somewhere that it uses alcohol? Ive never heard of such a thing. Is this something that is practical to use or do you prefer cooking on an electric skillet or portable propane stove outside?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Regarding the 'zincs' - make sure that the anodes are magnesium, not zinc. If you're not sure, replace them - they are not expensive. Magnesium anodes are much better for fresh water use and needed on a BIII drive. As far as the A/C seacock - it should be in your engine compartment - probably connected to a small sea strainer then the A/C circulating pump.

                    As far as battery selector switch, nothing you said was wrong - but you could leave the switch on both in the slip. Your battery charger should be hard wired directly to both batteries independent of the switch position so it really doesn't matter what the switch is on. As far as under way - 'both' is fine - just remember if you anchor out to switch to 1 or 2 so in case you drain a battery with the reefer, music, lights etc, you'll always have a fully charged start battery.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      RMSLLC wrote:
                      Thanks for all the replies! Good information!! Im still trying to locate the seacock for the A/C. I am 2 hours from my boat so I will look harder next time we are over there.

                      Another question:

                      How does the stove work? I read somewhere that it uses alcohol? Ive never heard of such a thing. Is this something that is practical to use or do you prefer cooking on an electric skillet or portable propane stove outside?
                      I have never heard anything good about using the alcohol stove. I've had alcohol/electric stoves on several boats and never used the alcohol set up. Been told the heat is erratic and hard to actually cook with. The way they work is to just fill the material filled bowl - like a chafing dish setup - light and cook. I like the propane grill deal better but admit the best way to cook onboard is at the dock with shorepower, the electric stove, micro wave and coffee maker (or better, a pizza from the local purveyor).

                      Comment

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