Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Transom water HELP!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Transom water HELP!

    So I bought a twice owned 2005 Trophy 2352 WA this spring, I/O Merc 5.0 runs beautiful (kicker motor not so much but i don't need it for Stripers) but this is my first ever fiberglass hull so i probably should have had someone look at it with me before i bought it but all in all i think its not all that bad of a deal (the big draw was that it had never seen salt water). The old girl needs some TLC, neither of the previous owners did any real maintenance, just the bare minimum. So now we are going through repairing gel coat, wiring, replacing parts etc. I replaced the transom mount transducer this spring and noticed a few drips of water but didn’t have time to get serious with it at the time. Now i have the boat up for the winter in heated storage we have pulled out and drilled out some of the screws that i had re-bedded This spring and there is still water in the hull. There does appear to be a little bit of rot in some of the holes but it is not wide spread. My question for any professionals out there is weather or not i can use a vacuum pump to suck out the moisture? I work in the HVAC business and have pumps that we use for vac’ing down A/C systems, if i drill and tap in a fitting and seal it up with some 5200 will the fiberglass and gel coat hold up to the vacuum? If the answer is no, am i making the problem worse if i just inject the holes with some gel coat resin and forget about it? I’d really appreciate any advice you folks can give me!

    #2
    I'm not sure that an HVAC vacuum pump will work. It will apply vacuum in a concentrated area. Also, the core is plywood and it will have moisture in between layers that has migrated a long way.

    A few years ago there was a company that used to advertise wood core drying, and infusion with a very low viscosity epoxy sealer. I do not know how effective it was, or if they are still in business. The equipment they used looked a lot like what flood restoration companies use to dry up hardwood floors. I seem to recall that they drilled multiple holes on both sides of a transom and would then use drying equipment similar to that below:


    Click image for larger version

Name:	XDSCF6486.jpg
Views:	151
Size:	95.9 KB
ID:	557700
    1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
    2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
    Anacortes, WA

    Comment


      #3
      I found the company: http://www.dryboat.com/
      1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
      2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
      Anacortes, WA

      Comment


        #4
        If the transom has some moisture intrusion it’s IMO fairly difficult to dry it out without opening things up. It could possibly be worse than it appears. Not trying to freak you out but I’d suggest drilling some small holes where you suspect any issues (1/8”-1/4”) into the transom (FROM THE INSIDE) just deep enough to get into the transom core material (plywood) and look at what the drill bit bring out. If it’s clean dry wood shavings your good to go. If wet dark colored wood shavings, mushy black goo, or water comes out you likely have an issue. Any holes drilled where things are dry can be sealed with thickened epoxy.
        Good luck with your testing.
        Dave
        Edmonds, WA
        "THE FIX"
        '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
        (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
        The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
        Misc. projects thread
        https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

        Comment


          #5
          If you find some small areas, like over the drain plug, and they are limited to a less than 10” x 10” square as a nominal, you could scarf in a new section of plywood. To do that, I’d use an oscillating tool and start with a plunge cut through a few layers to see the extent of the damage. Once you have established the perimeter of the damage, step the sides several times so you expand the surface layer about one third larger than the damage. Kind of a reverse stepped pyramid. Make a male plug to go in the hole and install it using thickened epoxy or resin.
          The vacuum method takes time. Lots of it. I used 1/8” clear tubing and mostly plastic fittings I got at Ace Hardware, rigged a collection jar, then sealed everything with a hot melt glue gun. I used a vac pump from Harbor Freight and ran it for a five days while I was at the boat. The balsa core I was trying to dry wasn’t very wet really, but, wet is wet, so I checked with my moisture meter for a baseline but then realized the deck was damp so, no baseline. Today, when I removed the hoses and glue plugs, I found the core to feel dryer, so I declared victory and filled the holes with thickened resin. If you want I can take a picture of the hoses and jar, but then, I’ll have to remember to do it.
          If you watch the dryboat videos, it looks like he also pumps in, or tries to, warm air. Just lowering the air pressure should be enough to lower the boiling temperature of the water so it evaporates. I read a post from a fellow on a Trawler Forum who did this and he spent the better part of six weeks in the summer with the pump running almost constantly to dry his deck out.
          P/C Pete
          Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
          1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
          Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
          MMSI 367770440

          Comment


            #6
            Based on what i found in my 2556, if there is water in the core, the moisture will go "down" , possible due to gravity, on vertical surfaces. Transom, stringers, when drilled, worst closest to the bottom, so might worth checking.
            Bayliner 2556 1990 project

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks guys, i appreciate your time. I will drill the transom from the inside but I’m optimistic from what I’ve seen on the out side of the transom that the issue is localized around a couple of screw holes that were poorly sealed by the previous owners (silicone should be illegal). If I can prove to myself that the issue is isolated to a few small areas I may try running the vac pump for a day or so on each small section then seal it up. I realize this is probably a half/a$$ approach but i am new to fiberglass and i dont feel confident diving right into a full on transom replacement/repair.

              Comment


              • builderdude
                builderdude commented
                Editing a comment
                I agree, sillycone has no place on a boat or anything els for that matter🤣

              #8
              Originally posted by SeaDonkey2352WA View Post
              Thanks guys, i appreciate your time. I will drill the transom from the inside but I’m optimistic from what I’ve seen on the out side of the transom that the issue is localized around a couple of screw holes that were poorly sealed by the previous owners (silicone should be illegal). If I can prove to myself that the issue is isolated to a few small areas I may try running the vac pump for a day or so on each small section then seal it up. I realize this is probably a half/a$$ approach but i am new to fiberglass and i dont feel confident diving right into a full on transom replacement/repair.
              You may want to add a catch bottle or some sort of water separator before the pump, so you don't get water in it.
              1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
              2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
              Anacortes, WA

              Comment


                #9
                Originally posted by SeaDonkey2352WA View Post
                ............. (silicone should be illegal).
                Originally posted by Dave
                I agree, sillycone has no place on a boat or anything els for that matter🤣
                I'll third that!

                Click image for larger version

Name:	Silicone   Say NO.jpg
Views:	91
Size:	337.6 KB
ID:	557809
                Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                Comment


                • builderdude
                  builderdude commented
                  Editing a comment
                  🤣

                • KVBruce
                  KVBruce commented
                  Editing a comment
                  What type of sealant would be recommended when I install a new depth sending unit on the transom and deck hardware?

                • builderdude
                  builderdude commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Bruce
                  3M 5200 below the waterline, 4200 for anything exposed to UV

                #10
                I see that Norton already responded regarding vacuum to dry the core. Adding heat to the mix would also help. The yard I use has a system called
                HotVac Hull Cure which does that. Last time I checked there are maybe 2 yards in the CONUS that have that system. But if you try to dry it yourself perhaps use one or more heat pads along with the vacuum. Perhaps study how the hotvac system works to determine a simpler DIY system.
                Tony Bacon,
                Washougal, WA
                Caspian
                1997 3788 Twin Cummins 250hp

                Comment

                Working...
                X