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Burning Your Used Oil?

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  • Mr._Darcy
    replied
    FWIW... in the isles of the Western Pacific it is common to dispose of used car, truck, boat and municipal power station engine oils by burning. The burning is done in pits dug in the ground, or by pouring into a lagoon and setting afire. So in those cases filtering and burning it as fuel might make better ecological sense as there are no provisions in most such locations to recycle used engine oil. Glad to have recycling options where we live as in much of the North American continent.

    Greg

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  • MerlinV
    replied
    I change the oil at anchor and burn the used oil as fuel. Even Cummins agrees with this. Just for the record we have Hino's.
    The question that needs to be asked is WHY? Just think of the (simplified) sequence when changing oil on a boat;

    1. Purchase the oil and filter(s)
    2. Transport it to the marina
    3. Haul the materials down the dock and on to the boat
    4. Go back to get empty containers to drain the old oil into
    5. Warm up engine(s) and drain oil into empty containers
    6. Replace filters
    7. Fill engine(s) with new oil
    8. Unload used engine oil containers on to the dock
    9. Unload newly emptied containers on to the dock
    10. Unload used filters on to the dock in a bucket to avoid drips or spills
    12. Haul the used oil and used filters to a local recycling point (may be the marina, Mr.Lube, City facilities etc.)
    13. Dispose of the newly emptied containers
    14. Get back to the boat and enjoy liquid refreshment.

    QUESTION: Why would anyone wish to keep used oil containers on board just to throw dirty used oil into their fuel tanks? There are simply no upsides to this argument.

    Oil companies spend millions if not billions to supply good quality lubricants. Used oil contains lots of undesirable chemicals despite being continuously filtered, remember, contaminants are measured in PPM (parts per million) and include Iron, Chromium, Aluminum, Boron, Coolant, Fuel, and of course dirt. This lot is bad enough in the crankcase and oil galleries, never mind introduce it to a finely designed close tolerance fuel system. Fuel systems usually have both primary and secondary filtration, and these are there to filter already clean diesel fuel, so to introduce dirty black used oil into the system in my view is bordering on insane.
    • Where are the savings? - There are none.
    • Is it ecologically beneficial? I say no, but that is a matter of opinion. Our boats don't make ecological sense in the first place, but burning black dirty fuel doesn't exactly improve that.
    • What do engine manufacturers thank? Probably none of them really support burning old oil, but I am aware that Cummins (N. America only) had a system a few years ago that introduced used oil (from a on-board tank) into the fuel being burned by on-highway trucks.
    • How often would fuel filters need replacing when they are also filtering black used oil?
    (Note to DMCB - Doug, I remember that you and I were having this exact argument here on BOC about 15 years ago)


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  • Centerline2
    commented on 's reply
    I think cummins is trying to stay reasonable with the epa standards in advising a 5% mix... or maybe its a viscosity thing.
    pure motor oil or trans oil will burn easily in a diesel engine without any diesel blended in at all..... it used to be a very common practice to use trans fluid to fill a new filter before installing it on the engine, but now that lift pumps are the norm. people dont seem to pre fill the filters anymore..

    john deere designed a multi-fuel engine that would run on any type of used oil. diesel. kerosene, or gasoline...it did not have to be blended for the engine to run, but it was required that the viscosity be thin enough to flow freely thru the lines when the weather turned cold....

  • dmcb
    replied
    I believe it was my post that was quoted. The reason for doing it is ease of disposal when changing on the water. Something I would never do if I thought it would do harm. Cummins says 5% is okay. Here is a post from another forum.
    I was reading through my Cummins service bulletin #3379001-05 dated 1995 covering fuel specs.
    Cummins makes a lube oil blender (part #3376317) for just such a purpose though it says not to exceed 5% used oil with fuel; which is just under 2 gallons per 35 gallon tank. The EPA also has a say in this concerning the amount of sulphur in the mixture; 500ppm. With this new ULSD fuel you shouldn't have any problems. Don't blend the WMO in one of the new motors.
    As far as the oil being clean; if it coming out of an operable motor which isn't sludged up you should have clean/filtered oil coming out of the pan. What the oil filter doesn't catch your fuel filter will; may have to change your fuel filter more often. I've never used more than 5% and I'm curious about some of the rich mixtures I'm reading about. Hope this helps.

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  • Lostone
    replied
    Most engines now are filtering the fuel down to the 2 micron level.

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  • Lostone
    replied
    Originally posted by BerettaRacer View Post
    Racor used to make a kit that would meter and add your used motor oil into the fuel filter system and feed it to the engines. I haven't seen or heard of one in years, but I haven't been looking either. On the little engines and small quantities of oil your dealing with it probably would not be economically feasible, I think it was geared to much larger systems.
    We used to have these systems on heavy equipment years ago that pulled the oil from the dump and You just topped off the oil and never had to change it. Just change the filter occasionally but they found that with the HEUI systems that small amount of contamination was damaging the pumps. If you’re running an engine that has mechanical fuel injection you probably wouldn’t have any problems.

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  • Centerline2
    commented on 's reply
    respectfully, if you have any hard substances floating (or setting on the bottom) of the oil pan, there are other more serious problems that need to be addressed...
    the reason we change oil is because it breaks down due to heat and acid contamination from the combustion process... there should never be particles in the crankcase oil that would hurt the fuel system, and in the off chance that something was "floating" in the oil, the fuel system should have 2 fuel filters that will strain out any particles big enough to cause problems....

    as for any further argument about damaging contamination in freshly changed, used crankcase oil, any one who has pumped a lot of diesel in their life can tell you the diesel fuel we pump often has some serious contamination in the form of sand, water and rust flakes... but with proper filter change intervals, the filters will catch it so it doesnt cause expensive repair issues.
    most marine fuel pumps are fitted with filters, but these filters are anywhere from 30 to 200 micron, and sometimes they dont get changed often enough and they can deteriorate and pass contaminates, and some pumps are not fitted with a dispensing filter at all..

  • fritzman
    replied
    It is a NO, think of the contamination that floats in your oil pan-- that is why we change oil, injectors today are constructed with very fine tolerances and can be damaged, check the price of new injectors + injector pump and see what your savings are burning old crankcase oil.

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  • Centerline2
    replied
    All diesel engines run fine on used motor oil, and as far as filtering goes, its been filtered many times overas it was being used as crankcase oil... if it is ok to run thru the bearings without scoring or damage, it wont hurt the pump or injectors either.... but its not something that can or will be endorsed by any manufacture of oil or engines due to ecological reasons...
    the used oil, trans fluid or a diesel additive, commonly called diesel fuel "conditioner" will add some lubricity to hiway fuel, which is a good and beneficial thing since they took the sulfer out of the fuel.... the red fuel for marine use still has most of the sulfer in it, so its better than hiway fuel for lubricating the pump, or unit injectors on common rail engines....
    is there any good reason not to pour the used oil in the fuel tank?... i would answer that with, not really (IF its been changed at recommended intervals)... no more than there is a good reason TO pour it in and burn it...

    bio-fuel is a blend of used crankcase oils, used fryer oils, rendered animal fats, raw corn oil and other types of oils that can be mixed into the "fuel" to bulk it up and then forced thru the system, getting less milage while claiming ecological reasons for doing it.... the crankcase oil alone is a better fuel...

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  • kwb
    replied
    I wouldn't do it on newer common rail/electronic engines but with old mechanical what I have heard is up to 3% is acceptable.

    I don't do it because disposal is free and easy, if it was harder to get rid of I might change my tune.

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  • BerettaRacer
    replied
    Racor used to make a kit that would meter and add your used motor oil into the fuel filter system and feed it to the engines. I haven't seen or heard of one in years, but I haven't been looking either. On the little engines and small quantities of oil your dealing with it probably would not be economically feasible, I think it was geared to much larger systems.

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  • boatworkfl
    replied
    There are diesel systems that automatically burn on a continuous basis engine oil and adds new oil.
    I read it somewhere in the past.

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  • MidnightSun
    replied
    Title reminds me of my friends dad way back when I was a kid. He did all his car work and kept the old engine oil. He had a newspaper log rolling machine that would roll up newspaper into a small log. Let the log sit in used oil until completely impregnated and then throw it into the wood stove to heat his garage. Darn log burned for what seemed like hours but talk about black smoke from the chimney and most likely illegal today.

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  • Jim_Gandee
    replied
    What in the world is the possible advantage of burning used oil?

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  • Pcpete
    replied
    That’s a new one on me. I added a qt of ATF to 200 gallons of diesel with my 1970’s Cummins and Detroit’s, but not engine oil. I did a google and the links mostly said the same as this: https://itstillruns.com/burn-motor-o...e-7935413.html
    It needs to be filtered at 300 degrees a bunch of times and other steps. Definitely not just pour it into the fuel tank.

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