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    2452 Transom replacement

    Has anybody replaced one on a 2452?
    Can anyone tell me if the inside plywood of transom is one piece all the way across? It looks like it might be 3 pieces I know there is a second layer of 3/4 plywood around the keyhole. I have wet wood on the starboard side from before the keyhole to the outside of the hull.
    It looks like a screw hole was not sealed.
    Test holes drilled here and there show wet to just damp wood going away from an old transducer screw.
    If the transom is indeed built from 3 pieces I might be able to just replace one side. Has anyone been under the shelf where the battery would sit?
    I think it's where 2859 owners find concrete.
    All of that is going to have to be cut out or back to get to what has to be replaced.
    I know what FUN I'm in for!
    I did the transom on a Seaswirl a few years back but that transom was flat and one piece all the way across. The wood was also more rotted and delamanated so it was easier to remove. I don't seem to have any delamanated spots. At least not that I can find tapping on it.
    Attached Files
    1992 2452
    5.0 alpha1 gen2

    #2
    If your 2452 is built anything like my 2556 the transom is indeed three separate sections. The center section around the keyhole (from port to starboard stringer) has doubled up core material and is the only section that has any force applied via thrust from the out drive. Im sure you could repair just the outboard section without any issues.
    The area you have pictured with test holes looks very localized so the repair could be minimal.
    Dave
    Edmonds, WA
    "THE FIX"
    '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
    (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
    The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
    Misc. projects thread
    https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

    Comment


    • Lineman1
      Lineman1 commented
      Editing a comment
      Dave
      I seem to have as many as 3 separate pieces on each side of the keyhole.

    • builderdude
      builderdude commented
      Editing a comment
      Doesn’t surprise me. I had four separate pieces of 3/8 ply making up my outboard sections.

    #3
    I had the exact same problem a few years ago. Once I found that the perimeter of the wet wood was not too large and all below the waterline, I decide to repair from the outside. The rest of the transom was dry. Only the outermost layer of plywood was wet in this area. I removed the glass skin and all wet wood, the very end of the stringer was wet but solid, I drilled test holes on the inside to confirm the stringer was dry. I let it air out over the winter and repaired the following spring.

    I dug out some additional wood so the new wood tucked under the original glass skin. ​​​​I used 2 layers of 3/8 plywood with a thin layer of Matt between them. I layered the new skin with 1708 biax, epoxy was used for the entire repair.

    I'm on my 3rd season with the repair and it's rock solid.
    2001 2859 DREAMER
    Bohemia River Maryland

    Comment


      #4
      Do not penetrate the exterior of the transom. I would suggest doing all of this work from inside of the transom, leaving the factory hull alone.
      You can use a router with a straight flute cutter set to depth as to NOT cut into the hull material.
      Cut the old core material into small sections as to make it easier to remove.
      Clean the surface free from the old plywood and fiberglass, and prep it to be rough enough for good glass/resin adhesion.

      If by chance you need to get into the stringers, cut the tops open ONLY, leaving what you can of the vertical sections of stringer shells.

      Minus removing the engine and stern drive, this is basically carpentry work.
      If you are any type of carpenter, you will do much better than what BL did when the boat was originally built.


      I've done 5 of these over the years..... and I've seen the crappy workmanship that was done by the OEM. Shameful to say the least!

      .
      Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
      2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
      Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
      Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
      Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

      Comment


        #5
        Have repaired numerus transom, prefer to work from the inside les cosmetic work later, one other point I always add some glass to the inside, it helps stiffening the transom.
        Slightly modified 2859 6.5 Diesel Bravo III X drive
        96 Dodge 5.9 5 speed Gear vender OD.

        Comment


          #6
          Work from the inside. It looks harder, but it’s really much easier. If you don’t have an oscillating tool, get one. I use a Dremel tool with a cutoff wheel to cut the inner layer of glass free, and always replace the whole plywood reinforcement. If I were to do another one, I’d take a long look at coosa wood. It’s a composite that is lighter and a lot less expensive than starboard, and is designed for this kind of application.
          P/C Pete
          Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
          1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
          Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
          1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
          MMSI 367770440
          1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
          Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

          Comment


            #7
            Ok, yesterday was a pretty good day. I removed almost all of the inside skin from the wet side. I can't believe how many separate pieces of wood the transom is made up of.
            Left to right looking back from inside, I have a 1/2 " piece of plywood that was slotted to bend to the curve of the back of the boat. Next was a tall narrow piece from the outside stringer to the motor stringer then, the 2 pieces that form the keyhole. With one more above the keyhole for good measure?
            Voids, bad laminations, and no fillet joints. Wow, quality workmanship must have been built on Monday morning or Friday afternoon.

            Took the cap off of the engine stringer the wood is fine. Not laminated to the cap but dry. The outside stringer looks like a 1x12 and is dry and clean where it meets the transom.
            The transom core was only wet on the bottom 6 inches left side of the keyhole.

            One little screw hole not sealed properly.

            Next, remove the last of the plywood and grind the fiberglass to prep for new plywood and skin. Whoopeeeeeeeeee

            see link below for pics.

            https://drive.google.com/folderview?...xaLqJ8serjYaea
            1992 2452
            5.0 alpha1 gen2

            Comment


              #8
              I also discovered during my repair that the OEM layup was total crap to say the least. Glad your transom is only compromised in a small area. Keep at it dude
              Dave
              Edmonds, WA
              "THE FIX"
              '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
              (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
              The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
              Misc. projects thread
              https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

              Comment


                #9
                I will get back after it next weekend. Now the $64 question .
                I put the one side back together right. Maybe one piece of 1/2" all the way across. Epoxy coated both sides. Epoxed and clamped to the hull for a good bond. No voids,good
                fillet joints etc.... What about the other side?
                With a 383 B3 am I going to have a boat that pulls left?
                Or should I just leave it and finish this thing?
                1992 2452
                5.0 alpha1 gen2

                Comment


                  #10
                  Originally posted by Lineman1 View Post
                  I will get back after it next weekend. Now the $64 question .
                  I put the one side back together right. Maybe one piece of 1/2" all the way across. Epoxy coated both sides. Epoxed and clamped to the hull for a good bond. No voids,good
                  fillet joints etc.... What about the other side?
                  With a 383 B3 am I going to have a boat that pulls left?
                  Or should I just leave it and finish this thing?
                  Center section around the keyhole is the only section with any force applied. My out board sections were only 3/8 core thickness. The starboard side is now twice as thick at 3/4. No it won’t pull left.
                  Dave
                  Edmonds, WA
                  "THE FIX"
                  '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
                  (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
                  The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                  Misc. projects thread
                  https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Don’t kid yourself...... the engine torque and stern drive torque will be placed against the entire structural transom.
                    A properly built 6.3L engine will produce lots of torque.
                    I would replace all core components.
                    Don't forget that you’ll be using matting between plywood layers.
                    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Rick, you think he should replace the entire transom? His single engine boat only has an issue on the one side. His transom is not flat or on the same plane all the way across. It sounds exactly like mine with three separate sections, the two outer sections being angled forward about 8 degrees or so and very thin core material there compared to the 2” thick center section that’s integrated into the main hull stringers.
                      Just askin
                      Dave
                      Edmonds, WA
                      "THE FIX"
                      '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
                      (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
                      The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                      Misc. projects thread
                      https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                      Comment


                        #13
                        I’d rip all of the old stuff out of there. Lineman already knows what was under the part he tore out, the rest is probably just more of the same. Lineman, I used a bamf flat tip screwdriver to wedge between the plywood and outter transom skin then pulled. I ripped a lot out every stroke. When I was glassing in the new plywood I took a couple of 4x4 sections cut to fit, inside and outside, high and low in the keyhole, and connected then with 5/8” all thread. Yes, I did dry fit everything first. Then I put the squeeze to them. I got excellent squeeze out. I made the drain plug so it’s sealed from the plywood and used a couple of layers of mat to line the keyhole. I filled the gaps between the plywood and hull with thickso before putting the inner layers of glass on. Rounding the corners really helps the glass form to the plywood at the inside top and around the keyhole.
                        P/C Pete
                        Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
                        1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
                        Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
                        1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
                        MMSI 367770440
                        1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
                        Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

                        Comment


                          #14
                          I agree with others here that you should just replace the whole transom. I did a small repair like you a while back, and now I'm finding that the water (rot) damage extended much farther than I expected. At some point I'll be replacing the whole thing with coosa and be done with it forever.
                          1995 Bayliner 2452 Mercruiser 5.7L Alpha 1 Gen 2

                          Comment


                            #15
                            Originally posted by builderdude View Post
                            Rick, you think he should replace the entire transom? His single engine boat only has an issue on the one side. His transom is not flat or on the same plane all the way across. It sounds exactly like mine with three separate sections, the two outer sections being angled forward about 8 degrees or so and very thin core material there compared to the 2” thick center section that’s integrated into the main hull stringers.
                            Just askin
                            Dave, you and I have both seen what BL did during the transom construction on these boats. Based on that alone, and now with 6.3L torque, I would do the entire core.
                            But that's just my take!
                            Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                            2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                            Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                            Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                            Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                            Comment

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