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Sinking -No Bail - Ciera 2252

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  • builderdude
    commented on 's reply
    It’s just a potential solution that looks good in my head
    ​​​​​​​

  • builderdude
    replied
    That would work fine, just remember the next owner or the next time it needs to be removed for whatever reason it may not come off.
    No sealant around the housing is needed, the transom seal is glued into the groove of the housing with bellows adhesive so it’ll stay where it should. The transom seal also encompasses all the mounting studs and the holes they go through so additional sealant is not necessary.
    For the oversized holes you could used any quality semi thickened epoxy, west system with just enough filler would work great.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quetz
    replied
    Thanks BD!! Silly question, why would I want to remove the assembly again after getting it into place. In other words, why not just set it in place, put epoxy through the bigger holes, perhaps some marine sealant through the others and put it all together?

    If using epoxy, what would you recommend? I am using 3M 4200 as the sealant. Would you put a sealant bead around the edge of the assembly on the outside part of the boat? Do you think setting the back plate in epoxy before tightening would be overkill?

    I don't ever intend to take it out again, if it has to come out or repaired it's going t the city dump. Man, this project was and is still being a royal pain in the butt. A lot of dirty manual labor.

    Leave a comment:


  • vr5200
    replied
    Originally posted by builderdude View Post
    If concerned here’s what I’d do:
    Wrap the studs with several wraps of tape to protect the threads from taking in any epoxy.
    Slide the assembly into place and temporarily secure it with a few washers and nuts using the holes that are not oversized, make sure it sits where it should.
    Inject some thickened epoxy around the studs at the oversized holes and let it cure. Removing the assembly after the epoxy cures may be difficult so a bond release of some sort would be helpful. You could also do each oversized hole one at a time to ensure you’ll be able to remove the assembly.
    This must be why you are known as builder dude!

    Leave a comment:


  • builderdude
    replied
    If concerned here’s what I’d do:
    Wrap the studs with several wraps of tape to protect the threads from taking in any epoxy.
    Slide the assembly into place and temporarily secure it with a few washers and nuts using the holes that are not oversized, make sure it sits where it should.
    Inject some thickened epoxy around the studs at the oversized holes and let it cure. Removing the assembly after the epoxy cures may be difficult so a bond release of some sort would be helpful. You could also do each oversized hole one at a time to ensure you’ll be able to remove the assembly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quetz
    replied
    If I do fill the holes, the Coosa material seems very soft should I will it with something more substantive like epoxy.

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  • Quetz
    replied
    Almost there, BUT . . . . OK, so I rebuild my transom with Coosa board. The outside back fiberglass was never touched so the holes that were there remained in place and there was core material added from the inside and re-glassed. So when it was time to re-drill the holes I did so as straight as possible but 3-4 of them were a little off, perhaps 1/8 – ¼ inch so the studs fit in OK on the back side since those holes were never touched, but are a little loose on the inside of the boat. The mechanic putting things back together has concerns that since they are a little bigger that under pressure while turning starboard or port the assembly will move and roll the rubber seal and start leaking again. They want to refill the holes, get a template from Mercruiser and re-drill the holes.

    1) Questions: how precise do the holes have to be drilled? As I said, it is within a quarter inch and only a few holes have play. I know they only get tightened to 20something lbs, so could this be an issue?

    2) Question: what else could I do? Could I apply an adhesive to the back of the assembly plate and sealant through the stud holes and call it done without much risk?

    The issue is I have been without the boat all season and the fiberglass guy at the marina is booked and if it’s not that big a deal I just want to get it in the water.

    Thank you in advance as always.

    Leave a comment:


  • builderdude
    replied
    Those are there to clear the steering arm swing port to starboard. It’d be best to test fit the transom assembly prior to glassing it over to ensure it’ll go lock to lock without making contact.
    Rebuilding a transom is a fairly big job, it can be frustrating for sure. Keep at it dude, you’ll have a solid boat when finished.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quetz
    replied
    What a Royal pain in the butt rebuilding this transom has been. Never again, I will sink it before I do another transom, ljk lol.

    So I am at the point of glassing over the Coosa board And I came upon a conundrum. What are these dimples at the top inside of the keyhole for? Do i need to rebuild them or can i finish it flush? If they are needed do you know the tolerances?

    Cheers

    Leave a comment:


  • Quetz
    replied
    Thanks BD, that's great advice! I took it to a machine shop who $200 later managed to get all the studs out. So i will clean it up and used JBWeld to reform the seal channel and on to the transom.

    Leave a comment:


  • builderdude
    replied
    I had multiple areas around the base of a few studs and an area where the seal rides where I aggressively ground out questionable material do to corrosion. I then cleaned and filled those areas with JB weld epoxy, sanded, primed & painted.

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  • Quetz
    replied
    You can see the inside channel for the seal is deformed from the metal reactions. It should still make a seal but still.

    Leave a comment:


  • Quetz
    replied
    I was thinking the same thing. I got the non rusted ones (two of them) off, but the other ones are going to snap. I will leave them with PB Blaster overnight and heat them tomorrow and give it a tug. If they won't come lose or snap i will find a machine shop.

    New ones ar many thousands and used ones are still a couple of thousand on Ebay. I don't want to have to get a new/used one if i can salvage this one. Do you guys think this metal chemical infusion will be an issue if i flatten it? (Its around the worst stud)

    Leave a comment:


  • builderdude
    replied
    Originally posted by Quetz View Post
    It looks like a few them have about half of the normal girth and are clearly deteriorated. I am afraid after doing all this work I will have to somehow pull it off again if a couple the of them give way and starts leaking again. Those skinny ones are likely to snap then i will have to extract them.
    Sorry didn't catch that, just saw they were rusty.

    Originally posted by Nauti_Mike View Post
    I would not feel comfortable using those studs either. PB Blaster and heat but I bet at least one will snap. You may want to price around for a used one that’s in better shape or take it to a machine shop and pay them to remove the studs.
    If a machine shop can remove and re install new ones that’d be the way to go for sure.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nauti_Mike
    replied
    I would not feel comfortable using those studs either. PB Blaster and heat but I bet at least one will snap. You may want to price around for a used one that’s in better shape or take it to a machine shop and pay them to remove the studs.

    Leave a comment:

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