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    #16
    Originally posted by Pcpete View Post
    Monty, part of my plan is to eliminate the need for the second plug and set up for a future additional connection on the transom. I can see where some switching will be needed to deactivate the connection not in use when another is active so there is no possibility of anybody getting a shock.
    PcPete, This exactly how my boat functions. I have a first set of loads that are fed directly from the first plug. I have a PARALLEL switch that controls where the second set of loads receive their power from; either from the second plug or from the first plug. The PARALLEL switch is built into my AC panel and when it is set to use power from the first plug, the second plug is totally isolated and there is no fear of someone being electrocuted by touching it. I would recommend you first implement this solution. Then, when you are ready, you can relocate the second plug to the transom (as you said you wanted to do).

    Good luck.
    Retired, computer expert / executive
    Bayliner 285 Cruiser / Mercruiser QSD 4.2L 320 HP Diesel
    Live in the Bay Area, CA, USA, boat in Turkey
    D-Marin @ Turgutreis in Bodrum/Turkey
    bdervisoglu8@gmail.com
    bulent@pacbell.net

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      #17
      Norton, great point about the cumulative load. I can easily mitigate that by inserting a 30 amp ELCI breaker as part of the junction box. The possible full load of either buss is well over 30 amps if I add the value of all of the breakers. The range alone has a 30 amp breaker, but, is anyone going to actually use the full draw of the range, hot water tank and electric heaters? I doubt it. I could disconnect the line two cable at both ends, install a 30 amp main breaker and have it feed both busses and have the same result with the exception of the cumulative load. However, using a Y cable already creates that condition, right?
      I have a 30 amp ELCI built for contractors that pops at 2ma that I used to test, locate and confirm a ground fault due to the way the inverter was installed originally, so building something like that, ABYC approved of course, would be easy.
      This is a great discussion, I'm really enjoying the various solutions and points of view.
      Pete
      P/C Pete
      Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
      1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
      Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
      1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
      MMSI 367770440
      1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
      Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

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        #18
        Good read on galvanic isolator types and testing: http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/g...solator&page=1
        1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
        2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
        Anacortes, WA

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          #19
          Charles makes some nice isolation transformers that are proven and dependable. https://www.defender.com/product.jsp?id=155415 My setup is 50a 250v. This allows for a smaller single line from dock pedestal to boat. Combine this with a 50a isolator https://www.defender.com/product3.js...9977&id=336117 which also breaks down the 250 to 110 and you have a nice system. Just another option to ponder.
          Cheers, Hans
          2007 Carver 41 CMY
          Twin Volvo D6-370
          Montreal, Canada
          Midnight Sun I Photos

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            #20
            Pete, you may find that an empty 50A plug is more available than 2 30’s...in which case you could Y it at the pedestal for full power to your panel. Aren’t your heaters and receptacles on different legs ?

            This would allow you a stock configuration for future use and next owner.
            1988 3888 "Liberty"
            Twin Cummins 6BT's 210hp
            Onan 8.0
            Boating Raritan Bay

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              #21
              Nick, you make some good points, but I really don't need two thirty, or fifteen for that matter, power lines. On the AC panel Line 1 has the hot water heater, battery charger and salon heater. Line 2 has the range, master stateroom heater and guest stateroom heater. The Inverter sub panel has the refrigerator, fwd outlets, aft outlets and microwave. The inverter is set up to supplement power to its circuits even if the boat is plugged in. The inverter batteries are not connected to the house system so the only way they recharge is from shore power or the gender. The total draw of all three heaters is 1500 watts. All three of them are capable of using 1500 watts however, my storage slot (I moor on the hard all year) only has 20 amp service. My stored power configuration is master stateroom and salon heaters, battery charger and inverter on. I leave the house batteries on so that should the power be interrupted the refrigerator can draw off of the inverter and the house batteries to keep chill.
              With the addition of the Espar heater, keeping the boat warm shouldn't be a problem.
              P/C Pete
              Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
              1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
              Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
              1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
              MMSI 367770440
              1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
              Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

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