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I need help to upgrade the appearance of my dash board.-gctid406381

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    I need help to upgrade the appearance of my dash board.-gctid406381

    The "dash" on my boat is cracking. An not the fiberglass lower layer but the black kind of paint that was factory installed. The boat built in 1985 has seen plenty of summers so it is all sun damage. What is the best fix? I might do it over the winter or fall.

    My thought was to use 5200 to fill the cracks, sand smooth and paint. But am am wondering if there is something else anyone has done.

    #2
    I think that Mike (Somesailor) can make up new panels..... shoot him a PM and ask him.

    You may be able to laminate a new shin onto the existing if you can remove the surface material from it. I did this once using a piece of P-lam and using a light fabric w/ resin to bond it.
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

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      #3
      2850Bounty wrote:
      I think that Mike (Somesailor) can make up new panels..... shoot him a PM and ask him.

      You may be able to laminate a new shin onto the existing if you can remove the surface material from it. I did this once using a piece of P-lam and using a light fabric w/ resin to bond it.
      I was going to suggest the same, but upon re-reading, I can't tell if he means the instrument panel backing, or the horizontal surface behind the windshield.

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        #4
        It would help to know which boat he is referring too as well. Small runabout or big cruiser?

        I don;t think you can sand 5200 and I don't know if you can paint it either. If it is the dash panel just remove it and use it for template and cut another one out of a nice wood or plexiglass.

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          #5
          From his profile it looks like it might be a 2460 without hardtop.

          The black would be the textured gel coat? If so, I would just paint it.

          No 5200 stays soft. No sanding there.

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            #6
            My boat is a 2860 soft top. I am looking for the entire surface behind the windshield. I would need to fill the cracks with something.

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              #7
              zamboni65 wrote:
              My boat is a 2860 soft top. I am looking for the entire surface behind the windshield. I would need to fill the cracks with something.
              As mentioned above, you shouldn't use 5200.

              Surface prep the area by sanding, and http://"http://solutions.3m.com/wps/...<br /> filling. then paint with a marine paint or gelcoat. Lots of labour ahead, to do it well.

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                #8
                If you possess the ninja skills the automotive industry has the repair stuff to do the deed providing the dash is merely cracked. By that I mean not crumbling completely dried out / sun baked to death. They make a 2 part plastic part adhesive / repair / filler that comes in soft and hard. I can't think of the exact title but I'm pretty sure 3M makes it and a few years back it was around $32 for the 2 tube kit. It will fill sand and feather sand just like bondo and takes paint well. I used it to fix a bombardier Formula that my daughter wrapped around a tree the first time she used it. The hood on that snowmobile is super light flexy and probably the worst thing you could imagine to fix yet I did it using only some nylon web backer ( similar to the tape you use to tape drywall corners). It never cracked again so it must be good stuff.

                You won't find it at Advance or Auto Zone but rather the places body shops buy their supplies. If you can take the piece in with you and let them decide which type suits you best. The stuff mixes and spreads just like JB Weld. If you aren't familar with body shop techniques ask the counter guy how to prep it. You don't just fill the crack but rather stop drill it at the end and then taper sand both edges leaving the area as rough as possible to help give your filler "tooth" for strength. I like using a Dremel tool for dressing things like this. When putting the screws back into it make sure to use "your best limp wristed style" as I always say. Too loose is lots better than slightly too tight with those plastic panels as most cracks seem to originate at a screw hole.

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