Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anyone located in Tacoma that knows how to splice rope and chain?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Anyone located in Tacoma that knows how to splice rope and chain?

    Hi Folks,

    I'm adding a windlass and decided to add a short length of rope between the chain and anchor point in the chain locker for emergency cut-away. Trouble is I don't know how to do the splice and am hoping I can find someone in the Tacoma areas that knows how and is willing to teach me.

    Thanks in advance.

    Paul
    US Army (Retired), Federal Way, WA

    1990 Bayliner 3288 - the "Janna Lea"
    MMSI: 338181912

    #2
    Yes & it is pretty easy...
    do a search on YouTube, you'll find it.
    Joon, Kathy, Jaden & Tristan
    Uniflite 42 AC, DD 671N
    93 3058 sold
    92 2855 (day boat)
    91 Fourwinns 205 (lake boat)
    Longbranch WA
    Life is Good

    Comment


    • O1dSoldier
      O1dSoldier commented
      Editing a comment
      I've looked at a few videos. I'm more of a tactile learner so would prefer to find someone who can walk me through it.

    #3
    Personally I would just use a quick link or a carabiner if you are looking for a quick release method. Not as quick as a knife but close enough.
    1989 3888
    Nobody gets out alive.

    Comment


    • O1dSoldier
      O1dSoldier commented
      Editing a comment
      This requires going down into the chain locker which isn't practical in an emergency situation. The idea being that if that situation emerges I can, from the deck, fully extend the rode past the chain and have the short bit of rope exposed where I or crew can cut away.

    #4
    I always wonder what emergency would arise so suddenly that I would be in that I would rather cut loose an anchor (that is apparently well stuck) and moving instead of staying put.

    Personally I just carry a 4" grinder with cut off wheel if I need to cut something or well most anything.

    1989 3888
    Nobody gets out alive.

    Comment


      #5
      Seeing as this will never really have to function thru the windlass, you could just tie an anchor hitch to your chain, or even a couple square knots. 1/2” rope at the most so it is easy to cut. But being a former machinist, my OCD would require me to splice it in too. A caribiner might be difficult to disconnect in an emergency situation with tension on the rope.
      Esteban
      B-ham!
      Former Bayliners 3218, 2859, 2252, 1952

      Comment


      • O1dSoldier
        O1dSoldier commented
        Editing a comment
        It will have to work through a windlass but even if it didn't I'd want to splice it properly.

      #6
      3 ply twisted line is dead simple to splice but I understand why you would be reluctant to make the first splice on your anchor rode. If you can't find someone to teach you in person then why not ease into it with some practice splices. Splice some eyes into short pieces of dock line. Once you've done a few you'll likely lose your reluctance to do the anchor rode. I learned from my father who learned from his father but neither of them had ever heard of Youtube.
      R.J.(Bob) Evans
      Buchanan, SK
      Cierra 2755
      Previously 43 Defever, Response LX
      Various runabouts, canoes & kayaks

      Comment


      • O1dSoldier
        O1dSoldier commented
        Editing a comment
        I'd never just jump right to the anchor rode without a few practice attempts and it appears YouTube will end up being the source. I've only looked at a few videos so far and most are either poor quality or poor angles of view. I'll need to spend more time looking for a better quality video.

      #7
      When I installed my windlass the required rope to chain splice at first glance seemed like it would be rocket science to learn to do, but like most things I obsessed over it then taught myself to do it with the help of the following guide;

      http://www.johndanicic.com/sailing%2...7_Splicing.pdf

      I looked at and tried many others and youtubes and always came back to this one, a copy of it hangs in my garage to this day.

      I just got a piece of chain and rope and the required tools, spread a towel on the coffee table and went to school, the learning curve seemed very steep at first but quickly becomes easier. I have used the crap out of my windlass and the splice has held up great. I did add a few minor things to it such as a an anti-chaff liner between the rope and chain (think large heat shrink tubing) and a slight wrap of high tensile, small diameter waxed twine at the trailing end.
      My wife became a little worried when I kept playing with chain and rope while watching TV, I just told her it was the male equivalent to knitting.

      Mine is the 3 strand type, for your use at the hull anchor point, the elongated splice would do nicely, is much easier to do and will feed through the gypsy without issue.
      I learned that one too for comparison value but ultimately went with the tapered back splice.
      " WET EVER "
      1989 2459 TROPHY OFFSHORE 5.8L COBRA / SX
      mmsi 338108404
      mmsi 338124956
      "I started with nothing and still have most of it left"

      It's only a rock, get over it.

      Comment


        #8
        If you're going to do it yourself, here's everything you'll ever need to know: http://www.samsonrope.com/Pages/Spli...tructions.aspx
        R.J.(Bob) Evans
        Buchanan, SK
        Cierra 2755
        Previously 43 Defever, Response LX
        Various runabouts, canoes & kayaks

        Comment


          #9
          You are right...utube draws a vacuum...but try this one...it is short and you can repeat it often...

          https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=h4hjKUyPUqc

          1988 3888 "Liberty"
          Twin Cummins 6BT's 210hp
          Onan 8.0
          Boating Raritan Bay

          Comment


            #10
            Thanks dktool, bobofthenorth, and You've all provided great resources. I can build pretty much anything my wife shows me a picture of but splicing has remained rocket science as dktool has said. You all have insired me to work it out and will give the resources you've all shared a hard look this evening and get myself a practice chunk of rope and chain.

            Paul
            US Army (Retired), Federal Way, WA

            1990 Bayliner 3288 - the "Janna Lea"
            MMSI: 338181912

            Comment


              #11
              Originally posted by dktool View Post
              When I installed my windlass the required rope to chain splice at first glance seemed like it would be rocket science to learn to do, but like most things I obsessed over it then taught myself to do it with the help of the following guide;

              http://www.johndanicic.com/sailing%2...7_Splicing.pdf

              I looked at and tried many others and youtubes and always came back to this one, a copy of it hangs in my garage to this day.

              I just got a piece of chain and rope and the required tools, spread a towel on the coffee table and went to school, the learning curve seemed very steep at first but quickly becomes easier. I have used the crap out of my windlass and the splice has held up great. I did add a few minor things to it such as a an anti-chaff liner between the rope and chain (think large heat shrink tubing) and a slight wrap of high tensile, small diameter waxed twine at the trailing end.
              My wife became a little worried when I kept playing with chain and rope while watching TV, I just told her it was the male equivalent to knitting.

              Mine is the 3 strand type, for your use at the hull anchor point, the elongated splice would do nicely, is much easier to do and will feed through the gypsy without issue.
              I learned that one too for comparison value but ultimately went with the tapered back splice.
              I realise that the anecdote at the end is tongue in cheek, However, NEVER, NEVER USE A TOW BALL FOR ATTACHING ROPES OR SNATCH STRAPS TO. A broken tow ball flying through the air directly at the other driver can and HAS killed. Use a proper snatch tow point.
              2000 1750 Bowrider
              3.0Ltr Mercruiser, Alpha 1 leg
              SS 4 blade prop

              Comment


              • Nickp
                Nickp commented
                Editing a comment
                Excellent point...I will admit to doing that...convenient.

                You bringing up the potential hazard will make me think next time...thanks...

              #12
              Originally posted by chrisaw View Post

              I realise that the anecdote at the end is tongue in cheek, However, NEVER, NEVER USE A TOW BALL FOR ATTACHING ROPES OR SNATCH STRAPS TO. A broken tow ball flying through the air directly at the other driver can and HAS killed. Use a proper snatch tow point.
              " WET EVER "
              1989 2459 TROPHY OFFSHORE 5.8L COBRA / SX
              mmsi 338108404
              mmsi 338124956
              "I started with nothing and still have most of it left"

              It's only a rock, get over it.

              Comment


                #13
                Originally posted by chrisaw View Post

                I realise that the anecdote at the end is tongue in cheek, However, NEVER, NEVER USE A TOW BALL FOR ATTACHING ROPES OR SNATCH STRAPS TO. A broken tow ball flying through the air directly at the other driver can and HAS killed. Use a proper snatch tow point.
                He said "snatch"...
                Jeff & Tara
                (And Ginger too)
                Lake Havasu City, AZ

                2000 Bayliner 3388
                "GetAway"
                Cummins 4bta 250s

                In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. July 2, 2010

                Comment


                • Norton_Rider
                  Norton_Rider commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Lifetime ban...

                #14
                Originally posted by kwb View Post
                I always wonder what emergency would arise so suddenly that I would be in that I would rather cut loose an anchor (that is apparently well stuck) and moving instead of staying put.m

                Personally I just carry a 4" grinder with cut off wheel if I need to cut something or well most anything.
                J
                Having recently had to cut my chain lose (see my stuck anchor in Deer Harbor blog post) I can validate that having a section of rope at the bitter end is very significantly beneficial. Even in moderate current or wind you will no be able to get the load off the rode safely. I ran all 300 ft of chain out, tied it to a fender and cut the section of rope with a sharp knife. It went over board very fast and furious. Even if you only need this one time in an emergency in your boating carreer I could not imagine running an extension cord to the bow and taking the five minute to grind through even a small diameter chain in any rough condition.

                As for the splice. When I retrieved the anchor and put it back in its proper place I had to redo the splice. I do recommend adding enough rope to extend past the chain wheel or even slightly over your bow. That does cause it to feed through your windlass, however if you are cutting free in a rough sea you do not want any chain in the chain wheel when doing this. The proper splice leaves A very smooth and narrow transition between the chain and rope. It is most common used on sailboats where chain can be bulky and heavy so they often like to use rope for a significant amount of the rode. According to the articles I read the splice is just as strong as ias the rope and does not cause any weakness.
                Having not done so before I was just a bit hesitant but the only real trick is getting started around the last chain link of your bitter end. It is slightly tricky to get the first wrap started but only took me a few minutes to figure it out. The second important part is to taper the splice as you work it down your line, this is key to the smooth transition that will feed it through your chain wheel.

                I did find You tube video that does show how to do this. Look up Marine dock lines and splicing. I don’t currently have the link but it was one of several, not certain why it did not come up for you.
                4788 PH 2001, Cummins 370's
                2355 C Express, 1996 5L
                17ft Cobra, 1985, 125HP

                Exploring the Salish Sea

                Comment


                • O1dSoldier
                  O1dSoldier commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks for the backup on my plan to add a length of rope. :-) I did read your thread about the stuck anchor as it was happening which is where I got the idea of the rope. After some reading and research as I was deciding on equipment - windlass, bow roller, etc. I came across a couple articles/posts which recommended the rope for fast/emergency cutaway. Perhaps I will never find myself in a situation where I'd need to cut away and that's great but compared to all the other costs we incur with our hobby the cost of a short chunk of rope doesn't even register on the scale so I get some small peace of mind knowing I can cut away quickly if needed and don't have to worry about myself or a crew member trying to wield a grinder to cut a small link of chain under tension in rough conditions. Plus I get to learn a new skill. And a sharp knife takes up a lot less room than a grinder or bolt cutter.

                #15
                " and don't have to worry about myself or a crew member trying to wield a grinder to cut a small link of chain under tension in rough conditions."

                Every time I think of a cut off wheel equipped angle grinder on a boat I have visions of trashed fiberglass at the least, all the way up the spectrum to amputated body parts.

                " WET EVER "
                1989 2459 TROPHY OFFSHORE 5.8L COBRA / SX
                mmsi 338108404
                mmsi 338124956
                "I started with nothing and still have most of it left"

                It's only a rock, get over it.

                Comment

                Working...
                X