Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Electrical connectios and corrosion

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Electrical connectios and corrosion

    As one who has done electricity/electronics, I hate not necessarily in this order:
    Bullet connectors;
    Crimp on coax/PL259 connectors
    Molex connectors
    crimp electrical connectors/terminals

    Let me tell why. When I worked in marine electronics and two way radio, we bought 100 crimp on PL259s, and the PROPER tool to crimp them. After about a month, a lot of the installs came back inoperative because corrosion ate the center connection and kit disintegrated. We sent back the crimp-ons and went back to solder-ons. A lot less came back.
    Molex connectors and bullet connectors are ALEDGEDLY water resistant. For those who are not familiar with Molex stuff, the connector has anywhere from 4 to 18 bullet style connections inside of it. A male plug and female receptacle.
    . My last boat had one connecting the 12V switch panel to the boats wiring. I started having intermittent and found that behind a panel it had corroded connections and the added resistance caused them to heat up and actually melt the plastic plug body. I spent some time cutting out the connector and soldering/taping the connections, then coating with liquid 'lectric tape. No more intermittent.
    Waterproofing connections. Liquid lectric tape is in a bottle with an applicator in the cover. Paint it over a connection and it dries into a soft rubber-like coating. Very waterproof. If you have to get into it, slit it lengthwise and peel it off like a banana. I coated the connections on my boat trailer when I got it. 8 years later a light assembly got broken, I cut the wiring near the junction and the wires were still shiny copper.

    Bilge pumps: I put a light and buzzer on mine. Wire it from the dash override switch to ground. If the switch is activated or the float keys on, the buzzer and lamp will;l tell you its running. Any 12 lamp will work. We used to scuba dive and after getting into the boat some water from us got into the bilge. (Not a self bailing boat) When leaving the pump ran for 10-15 seconds and went off. If it ran for more than that, we stop and open the engine room hatch.
    Captharv 2001 2452
    "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

    #2
    If you have you boat surveyed by an ABYC surveyor and most others they will write up the soldered connections.
    Soldered connections are no longer approved for marine/boats and have not for many years.
    I use good quality adhesive heat shrink terminals on all my wiring below the sole and crimped with a ratcheting crimper which you need to follow the crimp to the release point on the crimper.
    If a wire is allowed to flex then that wire may break at the terminal over time.
    I do not remember what the USCG has on this issue for older pleasure boats , but inspected boats may not have soldered connections, nor currently manf. boats.
    I would not have one on my boat, it will affect the re-sale value.
    Even my battery terminals are crimped with a heavy duty 2 handed crimper and heavy duty adhesive heat shrink applied.
    Using the proper crimper makes a big difference, those stamped sheet steel crimpers do not belong on a boat.
    Insurance for an electrical fire could also be affected.
    Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

    Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
    Twin 350 GM power
    Located in Seward, AK
    Retired marine surveyor

    Comment


      #3
      That is very odd that USCG doesnt like soldered connections - I'd really like to hear the rationale on that.
      97 2859

      Comment


        #4
        The rational is there has been too many electrical fire from soldered connections, the solder flows out from the terminal slightly and when the wire flexes that connection is like bending a solid wire back and forth to break it.
        When the wire breaks there is a loose connection and that generates heat and fire.
        If you have a fire from a failed soldered joint kiss your insurance good-by!
        USCG and ABYC. Your boat did not come with soldered connections for a reason.
        I ran into this in Seward, AK when I was surveying, the owner changed out all his nice soldered connections, he was lucky there were not that many.

        Wicking - Drawback #1
        With soldering the melted solder will flow into and between the strands traveling in both directions from the point of soldering. This effect is known as "wicking" and the solder is "wicked" up into the strands of the wire much as a traditional wick will soak up a liquid. The issue arises that the solder creates a solid mass from the stranded wires just outside the connector and creates a new focal point for vibration which can cause the solder to crack inside or crate fatigue on the individual strands facilitating their premature breakage
        Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

        Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
        Twin 350 GM power
        Located in Seward, AK
        Retired marine surveyor

        Comment


        • builderdude
          builderdude commented
          Editing a comment
          Yep, this has been discussed many times here and the consensus was the crimped connection with quality heat shrink is the way to go for the very reasons you've mentioned.

        #5
        I've been using good crimps and then sealing it up with liquid electrical tape. Worked great on the boat trailer...
        88 Four Winns 200 Horizon 4.3 OMC
        98 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4.0/Selectrac
        07 Jeep Grand Cherokee 5.7 Hemi/Quadradrive II

        Long Island Sound Region

        Comment


        • hookemdano
          hookemdano commented
          Editing a comment
          same for me...has worked very well

        #6
        Whatever method you use to connect a joint, find a way to have it supported. My 3818 bonding system is kind of like a tree with branches connected with compression ferrules then wrapped with electrical tape. Every one of these joints is supported by a mounted wire tie. The connectors at the rudders, strainers, through hulls, etc are pretty ugly and the wire is 12ga. I asked my Marine Electrician about the “correct” way of replacing the system, I knew 8ga with marine compression connectors was a given, and he suggested doing what I’m going to call a hub and spoke system. I’m going to mount a power stud on the transom near one rudder then run individual wires from there to the rudder, swimstep post and strut. Then a wire will run to the next stud that will be connected to wires for the anode block, swimstep strut, trim tab bolts, and a wire going forward on the stringer to pickup the strainers and forward equipment.
        I personally think 8ga is overkill for a 38’ boat, but the ABYC has only one callout that applies for bonding on any size boat.
        P/C Pete
        Edmonds Yacht Club (Commodore 1993)
        1988 3818 "GLAUBEN”
        Hino EH700 175 Onan MDKD Genset
        1980 Encounter Sunbridge "Misty Blue" (Sold)
        MMSI 367770440
        1972 Chevrolet Nova Frame off Resto-mod in the garage
        Boating on the Salish Sea since 1948

        Comment


          #7
          I re-wired the complete boat as it was sunk prior to my buying it from the ins. company for $1100.00
          When I bonded it I used 8 ga. green jacketed Ancor marine tinned wire and 8 ga tinned copper heavy duty lugs and used heavy duty adhesive heat shrink on all terminals.
          The wire was run from all under water metal including the shaft using a shaft wipe to one engine the same on the other side to the other engine cross connecting
          Including the swim step SS supports. 10 ga would work but I got a good deal on all my Ancor wire and terminals and heat shrink.
          Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

          Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
          Twin 350 GM power
          Located in Seward, AK
          Retired marine surveyor

          Comment


            #8
            Originally posted by 88fourwinns View Post
            I've been using good crimps and then sealing it up with liquid electrical tape. Worked great on the boat trailer...
            I have been using the same with the ratcheting crimper. Wonder if I should go back to heat shrink?

            Ted G
            The Great PNW

            86 2850 Contessa SB
            Designers Edition
            Mercury 350 Mag
            290 Volvo DP

            Comment


              #9
              I use a ratcheting crimper with my adhesive heat shrink, I never use those stamped steel crimpers, the reattaching crimpers I use you need to complete the crimp or they will not release.
              I use all adhesive heat shrink in the bilge and engine room and on the FB. In the house I only use regular terminals, if they get wet some of my electronics will also get wet.
              I also put drip loops where necessary.
              I do not see anything wrong with liquid tape, I buy my terminals on eBay, much less expensive, same with Ancor wire or an equivalent.
              I was one of a few that passed the ABYC test in surveying school, been a few years though.
              Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

              Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
              Twin 350 GM power
              Located in Seward, AK
              Retired marine surveyor

              Comment


                #10
                Heat shrink connectors I use only...

                https://youtu.be/PMmgtIBqKZo
                Joon, Kathy, Jaden & Tristan
                Uniflite 42 AC, DD 671N
                93 3058 sold
                92 2855 (day boat)
                91 Fourwinns 205 (lake boat)
                Longbranch WA
                Life is Good

                Comment


                  #11
                  This is the only thing I could find on solder connections.

                  ABYC
                  11.14.5.7 Solder shall not be the sole means of mechanical connection in any circuit. If soldered, the connection shall be so located or supported as to minimize flexing of the conductor where the solder changes the flexible conductor into a solid conductor.

                  EXCEPTION: Battery lugs with a solder contact length of not less than 1.5 times the diameter of the conductor.
                  1999 Bayliner Ciera 2655
                  5.7 Bravo 3

                  Comment


                    #12
                    Originally posted by nwboater62 View Post
                    I have been using the same with the ratcheting crimper. Wonder if I should go back to heat shrink?
                    On the trailer what I do is take a good look at all my connections in the beginning of the season, if any of the old liquid electrical tape is looking like it cracked or there is an open spot I just give it another coat. That, and using good LED lights with grounds has eliminated the spring ritual of fiddling with the damn trailer lights!
                    88 Four Winns 200 Horizon 4.3 OMC
                    98 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4.0/Selectrac
                    07 Jeep Grand Cherokee 5.7 Hemi/Quadradrive II

                    Long Island Sound Region

                    Comment


                      #13
                      I have never seen one of the ratcheting crimpers - and here I thought I had about every tool I'd ever need.....but I will now once Amazon delivers my new Klein Tools crimper!
                      97 2859

                      Comment


                        #14
                        What is meant by: solder shall not be the sole means of connection: A wire must be mechanically secure by either wrapping it around the terminal or crimping a lug before soldering. Heat shrink: some are internally coated and when shrunk does indeed make a waterproof connection. However, the shrink must be the proper side for the wire.
                        Captharv 2001 2452
                        "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

                        Comment


                          #15
                          Read the ABYC site, it is lengthy. Follow the ABYC Standard in Electrical Wiring and Connections E-11

                          Wrapping the wire around a terminal is not approved!
                          If solder is used the the terminal must be crimped first, exceptions made for battery cable.
                          Solder has less current flow than a mechanical crimp.

                          Lead is not as good a conductor as copper. The resistance of copper is 13 times less than lead so why introduce it into the circuit if not necessary? The crimp will be a copper connector and a copper wire and the crimp pressure with seal out air and moisture creating a low resistance connection
                          Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                          Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                          Twin 350 GM power
                          Located in Seward, AK
                          Retired marine surveyor

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X