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Water leaking from inlet manifold 5.0L MPI

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    Water leaking from inlet manifold 5.0L MPI

    Hello all, I hope someone can shed a light on this problem below. Took the bayliner 260mpi out on a shallow weedy muddy saltwater lake - mistake number 1. - Ran aground - mistake number 2. Engine started stalling and I towed back to shore. Started motor at home no problem and proceeded to flush engine etc and noticed a jet of water escaping from top of manifold directly at air filter. This morning I took a photo showing the rusty area where a small square head plug seems to have let go. It seems to me maybe I have sucked up some debris from the lake and inadvertently pressurised the cooling system and this plug maybe is the weakest link. Any ideas PLEASE?

    Where should I be looking to clean out any sludge I may have sucked in?

    Many thanks in advance

    #2
    Replace the plug and flush the engine. Get an IR temp sensor and take reading at different locations on the engine and exhaust. Report the temps vs location.
    1997 Maxum 2400 SCR 5.7LX Bravo II

    Mike

    Comment


      #3
      thats just a manifold access port in to the engine cooling water... if it came out, it wasnt tight. get another plug, put some sealant on it and screw it in... pretty snug.
      and no, there is nothing you could have sucked up that caused it, it was just a coincidence that it happend at that time.... but it is true that you may have heated the engine up enough to build extra pressure in the cooling system, and helped to show the impending problem....


      NU LIBERTE'
      Salem, OR

      1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
      5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
      N2K equipped throughout..
      2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
      2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
      '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
      Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

      Comment


        #4
        Thank you for all the feedback, it is a great help. The centre of that plug seems to be missing or rusted through. It is not an allen key but some specialised tool I gather? Water is now spraying out of there like a tap as soon as motor runs with garden hose attached to the "ear muffs" on the leg. I am going to try and remove it once I can source the right tool and replace the plug somehow.

        Comment


          #5
          The square end of a 3/8 drive ratchet or extension is what I've used. PB blaster for a day or two should help also.
          What year? put ya boat details in ya signature.
          Dave
          Edmonds, WA
          "THE FIX"
          '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
          (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
          The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
          Misc. projects thread
          https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

          Comment


          • Nauti_Mike
            Nauti_Mike commented
            Editing a comment
            May require so heat as well.

          #6
          Originally posted by LakeMac@2261 View Post
          Thank you for all the feedback, it is a great help. The centre of that plug seems to be missing or rusted through. It is not an allen key but some specialised tool I gather? Water is now spraying out of there like a tap as soon as motor runs with garden hose attached to the "ear muffs" on the leg. I am going to try and remove it once I can source the right tool and replace the plug somehow.
          its supposed to be a half inch square hole to fit the end of a 1/2" ratchet drive extension... you must have seawater cooling for the plug to have corroded thru, or a VERY neglected freshwater cooling system... I suppose it could have been a faulty plug, but ive never seen one so cheaply made that it is that thin at that point.


          NU LIBERTE'
          Salem, OR

          1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
          5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
          N2K equipped throughout..
          2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
          2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
          '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
          Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

          Comment


            #7
            I tried that ....too small maybe rusted out?

            Comment


              #8
              it will take a tool called an "easy-out"... sized to fit the hole, which may need to be drilled out a little to get the corroded metal out of the way so the easy out can get a good grip in the hole... also called spiral screw adaptors... but there are square tapered ones also...


              NU LIBERTE'
              Salem, OR

              1989 Bayliner 2556 Convertible
              5.7 OMC Cobra - 15.5x11 prop
              N2K equipped throughout..
              2014 Ram 3500 crew cab, 6.7 Cummins
              2007 M-3705 SLC weekend warrior, 5th wheel
              '04 Polaris Sportsman 700 -- '05 Polaris Sportsman 500 HO
              Heavy Equipment Repair and Specialty Welding

              Comment


                #9
                Originally posted by Centerline2 View Post
                it will take a tool called an "easy-out"... sized to fit the hole, which may need to be drilled out a little to get the corroded metal out of the way so the easy out can get a good grip in the hole... also called spiral screw adaptors... but there are square tapered ones also...
                Oh those easy outs work.......most of the time. My advice to OP is buy the size that will fit from a tool store, name brand. Get one made of chinesium (harborFreight) and you may well create an even worse problem when it snaps off. One thing long suffering in the Rust Belt teaches you is patience pays when you can’t cherry it with the torch.. soak in Kroil, PB or like me Auto Tranny Oil and acetone, tap soak, twist tap. Be patient let it soak and tap twist tap soak. Time is your friend here and remember to try to tighten as hard as loosen. They often prefer to tighten just a smidge rather than loosen. once it’s budged even a tiny bit either way you’ve won. Personally I always put never seize on castings that like to keep the next time from being so interesting.

                Comment


                  #10
                  If the plug has rusted through causing the leak it may be pretty rusted inside the cooling jacket as well. Might be hard to get the plug out without basically drilling it out. A quick but temporary fix is to use some JB weld on the leaky area of the plug.
                  Dave
                  Edmonds, WA
                  "THE FIX"
                  '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
                  (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
                  The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                  Misc. projects thread
                  https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Be careful with that. If that plug is that rusted then the manifold itself may be close to rusting through. Any water in the oil? Those plugs are normally very difficult to remove. If you can't budge it, the options are remove the intake and take it to a machine shop to have them remove the plug and replace it, or if the manifold is rusted to the point of near failure, replace it. They can look great on the outside and be all rotted on the inside. If you try to remove it yourself, you may have to try heating the area around the plug (VERY CAREFULLY) to get the cast iron release its grip.

                    is it this one:
                    http://www.michiganmotorz.com/mercru...d-p-11192.html
                    88 Four Winns 200 Horizon 4.3 OMC
                    98 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4.0/Selectrac
                    07 Jeep Grand Cherokee 5.7 Hemi/Quadradrive II

                    Long Island Sound Region

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Wow, more great advice, thanks very much! There is a trace of water/oil mix inside the oil filler cap but hard to say if it is just condensation in the really humid weather we are having here in Australia. The dipstick looks nice and full of clean oil.
                      If the rust internally is so bad that the plug has perished, is it safe to just fix the plug or take it as a sign the whole inlet manifold needs to be removed and serviced etc? in other words am I at risk of doing more harm using the motor like this?
                      I have only recently had it serviced and replaced the riser manifolds.
                      Many thanks in advance.

                      Comment


                        #13
                        Originally posted by LakeMac@2261 View Post
                        Wow, more great advice, thanks very much! There is a trace of water/oil mix inside the oil filler cap but hard to say if it is just condensation in the really humid weather we are having here in Australia. The dipstick looks nice and full of clean oil.
                        If the rust internally is so bad that the plug has perished, is it safe to just fix the plug or take it as a sign the whole inlet manifold needs to be removed and serviced etc? in other words am I at risk of doing more harm using the motor like this?
                        I have only recently had it serviced and replaced the riser manifolds.
                        Many thanks in advance.
                        Short answer: if the cooling jackets in the intake are "rusting away" the cooling jackets throughout the entire engine will be nearly the same. You can pull the t stat housing to get a visual inside that cooling jacket. Kind of where I was going in post 78 here.
                        https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...id815795/page6
                        What year is this boat?
                        Dave
                        Edmonds, WA
                        "THE FIX"
                        '93 2556 5.7 Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P
                        (.030 over-Vortec top end-part closed cooled)
                        The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                        Misc. projects thread
                        https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Pour a little Pepsi on it let sit a day or 2.
                          Be good, be happy, for tomorrow is promised to no man !

                          1994 2452, 5.0l, Alpha gen. 2 drive. Sold ! Sold ! Sold !

                          '86 / 19' Citation cuddy, Merc. 3.0L / 140 hp 86' , stringer drive. Sold ! Sold ! Sold !

                          Manalapan N.J

                          Comment


                            #15
                            One way to gauge how much corrosion there is in the water passage is to remove the thermostat housing and drain the block down a bit, let it dry out and then poke around in there with a screwdriver just gently. If its just a bit of flaking cast iron fine, but if comes off in big chunks, maybe not fine. The water passage is just at the front of the manifold, under the stat housing, and provides a crossover to each cyl head. The rest of the manifold has no water passages in it.
                            88 Four Winns 200 Horizon 4.3 OMC
                            98 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4.0/Selectrac
                            07 Jeep Grand Cherokee 5.7 Hemi/Quadradrive II

                            Long Island Sound Region

                            Comment

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