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2850 Teak Bulk Head removal-gctid348305

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    2850 Teak Bulk Head removal-gctid348305

    Has any one removed the teak bulkhead on their 2850? Some one has had this one out before but I have no idea what they used to seal the bottom of the wall. It is white in color, and very hard. I thought it might have been glass resin but it's some type of sealant or cement. I thought about using a heat gun, but not really sure I want to do that unless I really have too. If you have any ideas or suggestions let me know.

    I have the top and sides loose but the bottom will not move, thanks for the help.

    Thanks,

    Mark

    #2
    Blueox wrote:
    Has any one removed the teak bulkhead on their 2850? Some one has had this one out before but I have no idea what they used to seal the bottom of the wall. It is white in color, and very hard. I thought it might have been glass resin but it's some type of sealant or cement. I thought about using a heat gun, but not really sure I want to do that unless I really have too. If you have any ideas or suggestions let me know.

    I have the top and sides loose but the bottom will not move, thanks for the help.

    Thanks,

    Mark
    Look for hidden screws.
    Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

    Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
    Twin 350 GM power
    Located in Seward, AK
    Retired marine surveyor

    Comment


      #3
      I thought that too, but I am not seeing anymore screws. I looked under the deck this morning, there is a support board for the engine room bulkhead I will take out tonight to make sure there are no screws hiding under there. I would not have pulled it out, but I figured it would be easier to fix the leaks if I pulled it out and resealed everyting and brought the wood back to life. :hammer The Admiral told me I had to fix the leaks before she would recover the seats. :worth

      Comment


        #4
        Maybe Marine Tex??

        It is white and hard - can be a real pain to remove, chisel and hammer kind of thing.

        Comment


          #5
          Blueox wrote:
          I thought that too, but I am not seeing anymore screws. I looked under the deck this morning, there is a support board for the engine room bulkhead I will take out tonight to make sure there are no screws hiding under there. I would not have pulled it out, but I figured it would be easier to fix the leaks if I pulled it out and resealed everyting and brought the wood back to life. :hammer The Admiral told me I had to fix the leaks before she would recover the seats. :worth
          Check for wood plugs hiding the screw heads.
          Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

          Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
          Twin 350 GM power
          Located in Seward, AK
          Retired marine surveyor

          Comment


            #6
            I went to Home Depot tonight after work and got 2 wonder bars and was able to get the bulkhead loose. I am still on the fence about if this was a good idea to take it out or not. The bottom board is rotten and will need to be replaced and I have some glass repair to do on the bottom lip. I will also repair a couple of the screw holes on top that have cracks coming from them. Now back to work I go.... :arr

            Comment


              #7
              Like others said, you are very likely to have hidden screws. In removing one of my bulkheads, I found several screws that were glassed over. It almost makes sense to get a stud finder and run it across the bulkhead to see if there are any hidden screws.

              But as for removing it, this tool is your best friend! With the proper attachment, it will slice through your bulkhead like a hot knife through butter. The metal/wood attachment will go through screws seamlessly, unless they are stainless steel.

              The beautiful thing about working with an oscillating tool is your ability to cut through cornered edges with a lot of accuracy. It also makes a minimal amount of dust compared to a reciprocating saw.

              Comment


                #8
                Hey everyone - I am looking to replace the port side of my bulkhead. I just purchased 1984 Bayliner explorer with the teak alaskan bulkhead. but the starboard side has some peeling just under the window :thumb so I am looking for the best way to repair or replace the damaged piece.

                I am assuming that my bulkhead is going to be similar to yours (I may be wrong), but if it is, I was wondering if you had any tips or advice from your experiences!

                Thanks!!
                David W. PDX, OR
                2002 Bayliner 2452XE Ciera
                5.0L Mercruiser (carbed) w/ A1 gen 2 drive
                (14.5"x15" 4-blade Solas Aluminum Prop)
                1984 2070 Explorer w/ Alaskan Bulkhead (SOLD)

                Comment


                  #9
                  If you replace the bulkhead with teak plywood be sure you seal all the edges very well, teak plywood is not exterior plywood.

                  Another way is to buy BC fully plugged exterior plywood, and you can buy teak veneer with a water proof paper backing and laminate it, I have used this method often, you need to use contact cement and have a rubber roller commonly used for laminate counter tops.

                  I used to use teak oil, now I use solvent based polyurethane, a dust free area helps, or buy a $10-15 dollar top loader spray gun from harbor freight, I get them for $9.99 on sale.

                  polyurethane eliminates the mold issue and is easy to clean and somewhat waterproof.

                  For some repairs I switched from real teak lumber to Jotoba, teak is 3+ times more expensive than jatoba and the color is close, a ting more on the red side, and it has a fantastic grain, harder than teak and takes a finish better as it is not waxy like teak.

                  I re-did my helm sides with teak veneer, looks like new.

                  My 3870 cockpit teak has been drilled and filled a number of times, and I intend to use Jatoba, bought Jatoba for under $8.00 a board ft in Anchorage at Hardware Specialties, even less expensive in Florida.

                  Just some ideas.
                  Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                  Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                  Twin 350 GM power
                  Located in Seward, AK
                  Retired marine surveyor

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Blueox wrote:
                    Has any one removed the teak bulkhead on their 2850?
                    What bulkhead are you referring to? I am in the process of repair the bulkhead between the engine and the fuel tank. I intend to cut the existing one off at the hull with an ocillating tool. I can tell you in a week on the removal process.

                    I intend to make a replacement piece with ACX plywood and glass all sides, including the bottom. I will attach the piece to the hull and sides with fiberglass. I believe the side toward the engine is gel coat. Can someone confirm this? Does this process sound okey or is there anything I should do differently?

                    Thanks,

                    Joe

                    Attached files http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]
                    1986 2850 Commend Bridge on hydrohoist
                    A260 and AQ280 with DP lower unit

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Just a little follow-up. After exploring the options I have decided to go with the Jabota wood and just try to stain it as closely as I can to the other (Thanks Boatworkfl). It seems to be the most durable and relatively inexpensive option and fish don't care if you're off a shade or two. I have bought the wood, now just need to find the time to tear it all out and get it done.

                      jmcajmca - I was talking about the cabin bulkhead, but I hope your engine compartment bulkhead replacement went well!!

                      Will follow-up again after I've made more progress.
                      David W. PDX, OR
                      2002 Bayliner 2452XE Ciera
                      5.0L Mercruiser (carbed) w/ A1 gen 2 drive
                      (14.5"x15" 4-blade Solas Aluminum Prop)
                      1984 2070 Explorer w/ Alaskan Bulkhead (SOLD)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Hey guys -I went in to talk with some wood guys to see if they had any advice on the Jatoba paneling replacement. They said, that perhaps an easier place to start would be to try to repair the existing wood. They said to try a CPES Sealer to see if it would just bind the fibers back together and also seal the rest of the wood. If that didn't work they wanted me to try an epoxy resin in the hole to seal the gap. I also finally snapped some pictures of the actual problem, so you can see what I am dealing with! ANY advice on the CPES/resin approach versus the full replacement would be greatly appreciated!

                        [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/750963=34749-photo (6).jpg[/img]Here you can see the location: just under the starboard side window leading into the cabin

                        [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/750963=34750-photo (7).jpg[/img]Here is a little closer up where you can see the splitting and some of the damaged fibers inside

                        [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/750963=34751-photo (8).jpg[/img]Here is my attempt to get a picture of the damage inside the wood (sorry not very clear)
                        David W. PDX, OR
                        2002 Bayliner 2452XE Ciera
                        5.0L Mercruiser (carbed) w/ A1 gen 2 drive
                        (14.5"x15" 4-blade Solas Aluminum Prop)
                        1984 2070 Explorer w/ Alaskan Bulkhead (SOLD)

                        Comment

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