Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Testing which battery is on which switch setting-gctid808662

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Testing which battery is on which switch setting-gctid808662

    After changing out my batteries this past winter, I realized I have no idea which battery switch setting goes to which battery. I have a dual battery set up for my 2455. I assumed, up until now, that switch setting #1 is for the starting battery and #2 was for the house battery but I really don't know given the "fancy" wiring job I inherited with the boat. I went out for my first over night trip ever on the hook the past weekend. Any other overnight has been at a marina somewhere with shore power, so I didn't really think about having to switch to the house battery when the engine isn't running. I want to test to see which battery is on which switch. Being a complete noob on batteries, my idea is to switch to one setting, have someone crank the engine and test the draw on each battery to see which one is being used. Is that a good idea? Is there a better way to test this? Thanks.
    2001 Bayliner Ciera 2455 5.7 Merc MPI, Bravo 3
    2009 Subaru WRX STI
    2017 stick with a nail on the end of it


    Victoria, BC

    #2
    You shouldn't have to test the draw on each battery. If the switch is on battery 1 and the engine cranks, then you know that is your starting batttery. To be sure, move the switch to battery 2 and the engine should not crank, therefore, battery 2 would be your house battery.
    Two C's 1990 3888 MY, 175 Hinos, Hurth 630 Trannys
    Past Commodore Emerald Rose Yacht Club
    Member International Order of the Blue Gavel
    MMSI: 338030604

    Comment


      #3
      "jmcannonball" post=808664 wrote:
      You shouldn't have to test the draw on each battery. If the switch is on battery 1 and the engine cranks, then you know that is your starting batttery. To be sure, move the switch to battery 2 and the engine should not crank, therefore, battery 2 would be your house battery.
      Not so with a single engine cruiser. The common lug on the MBSS will feed the starter lug, so either bank will crank the starter. A simple test would be to remove a positive cable from just one battery and see witch selection at the MBSS still supplies power to the boat.
      Dave
      Edmonds, WA
      "THE FIX"
      '93 2556
      Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

      The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
      Misc. projects thread
      https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

      Comment


        #4
        "builderdude" post=808666 wrote:
        "jmcannonball" post=808664 wrote:
        You shouldn't have to test the draw on each battery. If the switch is on battery 1 and the engine cranks, then you know that is your starting batttery. To be sure, move the switch to battery 2 and the engine should not crank, therefore, battery 2 would be your house battery.
        Not so with a single engine cruiser. The common lug on the MBSS will feed the starter lug, so either bank will crank the starter. A simple test would be to remove a positive cable from just one battery and see witch selection at the MBSS still supplies power to the boat.
        [color]blue wrote:
        No offense jmcannonball, but Dave is correct.

        Either selector position (#1 or #2) will allow him to crank the engine and/or to power the house loads.

        If #1 selection does not draw from the Start Load Batt Bank only, then simply switch the Positive cables at the batteries or at the rear of the MBSS terminals #1 and #2.

        MBSS selection #1 will pull from the dedicated cranking battery.

        MBSS selection #2 will pull from the Deep Cycle bank.

        MBSS selection ALL/BOTH will pull from both battery banks.

        Regardless of which MBSS selection is made, you will be powering the common cable, of which in turn will power the engine harness and hull harness.

        .[/color]
        Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
        2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
        Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
        Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
        Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

        Comment


          #5
          Hey thanks guys. I was pretty sure I could start on both settings as well as the BOTH setting. I'll try taking the positive lead off and test. Sounds like a better idea than my original one.
          2001 Bayliner Ciera 2455 5.7 Merc MPI, Bravo 3
          2009 Subaru WRX STI
          2017 stick with a nail on the end of it


          Victoria, BC

          Comment


            #6
            "jmcannonball" post=808664 wrote:
            You shouldn't have to test the draw on each battery. If the switch is on battery 1 and the engine cranks, then you know that is your starting batttery. To be sure, move the switch to battery 2 and the engine should not crank, therefore, battery 2 would be your house battery.
            Thank you, I stand corrected.
            Two C's 1990 3888 MY, 175 Hinos, Hurth 630 Trannys
            Past Commodore Emerald Rose Yacht Club
            Member International Order of the Blue Gavel
            MMSI: 338030604

            Comment


              #7
              I have a 2003 2455 and the number one battery is the outboard one and number two is the inboard one. Hope yours is the same.
              2003 245 5.0L Alph 1 Gen II
              Libertyville IL.

              Comment


                #8
                There is no official rule regarding the #1 and #2 battery banks relative to the MBSS #1 and #2 selections for a single engine boat.

                However, the below is commonly used and is easy for average Joe Boater to understand and to remember which is which.

                Battery Bank #1 is typically made up from a single dedicated cranking battery.

                In other words...... 1 single battery is synonymous with MBSS selection #1.

                Battery Bank #2 is typically made up from multiple Deep Cycle batteries (2 or more).

                In other words...... 2 (or more) batteries is synonymous with MBSS selection #2.

                So........if following the above, we would start up on Batt Bank #1, and then while at anchor, we would switch to Batt Bank #2 for house loads, keeping #1 in Reserve!

                Any of us could reverse this configuration, and there would be no issue as long as we remember which is which.

                For example......... we would then crank on #2, and while at achor, we would then operate House Loads on #1, keeping #2 in Reserve!

                .
                Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks for all the feedback folks. Great info.

                  I tried your suggestion today, builderdude, by removing the positive lead on my starter battery, set MBSS to #1 and then went and threw the key. I didn't even have to turn the engine. I just turned it the first click and I didn't get the regular alarm chirp nor did did the fuel pump prime. I went and tested the other settings on BOTH and #2, the alarmed chirped and the fuel pump primed. Reconnected the positive lead and the chirp and prime both fired off on setting #1. Case solved!
                  2001 Bayliner Ciera 2455 5.7 Merc MPI, Bravo 3
                  2009 Subaru WRX STI
                  2017 stick with a nail on the end of it


                  Victoria, BC

                  Comment


                    #10
                    "rossi45" post=808917 wrote:


                    I tried your suggestion today, builderdude, by removing the positive lead on my starter battery,

                    1..... set MBSS to #1 and then went and threw the key. I didn't even have to turn the engine. I just turned it the first click and I didn't get the regular alarm chirp nor did did the fuel pump prime.

                    2..... I went and tested the other settings on BOTH and #2, the alarmed chirped and the fuel pump primed. Reconnected the positive lead and the chirp and prime both fired off on setting #1.

                    3.... Case solved!
                    [color]blue wrote:
                    By doing #1, you would have powered all 12 vdc on board.

                    By doing #2, you would have also powered all 12 vdc on board.

                    I'm not understanding why doing #2 would have chirped the alarm and primed the fuel pump, whereas #1 would not have done the same!!!!!![/color]

                    .
                    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Rick I understood the op had previously removed the possitive cable from what he believed to be his starting battery (MBSS selection #1) before he did the testing. He was trying to confirm which selection at the MBSS was actually the start bank. So selecting #1 with the cable removed would give him no juice
                      Dave
                      Edmonds, WA
                      "THE FIX"
                      '93 2556
                      Carbureted 383 Vortec-Bravo II 2.0:1 18 1/4x19 P

                      The rebuild of my 2556 https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...76?view=thread
                      Misc. projects thread
                      https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...56-gctid789773

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Glad you got it figured out - and kudos for at least understanding it's important to know what powers what!

                        That said, I can't imagine why anyone nowadays doesn't take advantage of the technology that's been available for many years to safely and independently separate start batteries/loads from house battery/loads on small boats. They are two DISTINCTLY different systems, with different purposes and different demands. I understand why manufacturers build them this way; because it's cheap and simple ( and also gets around some ABYC requirements concerning circuit protection for non-starting loads). But combining start and house functions in a traditional single switch is far from ideal. Sooner or later (perhaps after a couple beverages), you're going to forget to move that battery switch from one to the other (or worse, out of both), and wake up to two dead batteries (You DO have a fully charged handheld marine VHF radio on board for this type of issue, right?)

                        Instead, why not treat yourself to one of these:

                        https://www.bluesea.com/products/601...y_Switch_-_Red

                        And also, one of these:

                        https://www.bluesea.com/products/761...12_24V_DC_120A

                        For about $100, you get SEPERATE, dedicated switching for Start and House loads, and simple combining, all in one switch. And the ACR takes ALL the worry out of battery management - it automatically combines the batteries when a charging source is available on EITHER side (House battery via shorepower & battery charger, or Start battery underway from the alternator), and SEPARATES the batteries when NO charging is available - preventing your start battery from being unintentionally drained by house loads.

                        This is any easy retrofit for any small cruiser, and has other benefits like Start isolation and remote monitoring/switching that will really save a lot of headaches. Highly recommended (and no, I don't work for Blue Seas - but they make great stuff).
                        Grant
                        Seattle, WA
                        2004 305
                        350 MAG MPI, Bravo 3

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Yup this ÔêåÔêåÔêåÔêåÔêåÔêå

                          I just installed the switch and ACR and now can put my mind at ease.

                          You can get both as a kit and save a couple bucks too.
                          Wet'ever
                          1989 Avanti 2955
                          460 Cobra

                          Comment


                            #14
                            "Car2n" post=809005 wrote:
                            Yup this ÔêåÔêåÔêåÔêåÔêåÔêå

                            I just installed the switch and ACR and now can put my mind at ease.

                            You can get both as a kit and save a couple bucks too.
                            There is no sure-fix solution to all possible user errors and/or device mal-functions. The dual-circuit switch is a good solution against unintentional depleting of both batteries but this prevents combining the two batteries if/when needed. The ACR is a good solution for combining the batteries so a single alternator (or charger) can charge both WHEN THE ENGINE IS RUNNING. However, a combination of the dual-circuit switch and ACR can still leave you stranded if your start battery is dead.

                            As a first order of solution you should add a remote switch to the ACR so you can force-combine the batteries; Yes, you may be able to do this directly on the ACR if you have the right model of ACR but that requires you to reach into wherever the ACR is installed just to start the engine. Furthermore, if the start battery is damaged and/or completely drained it may not be a good idea to combine it with the house battery. The bottom-line is it may be desirable to have manual control over which single battery or both batteries, is used to start the engine.

                            Whichever solution you choose you can not replace the need for the captain to be knowledgeable and careful about how s/he operates the boat!

                            Enjoy,
                            Retired, computer expert / executive
                            Bayliner 285 Cruiser / Mercruiser QSD 4.2L 320 HP Diesel
                            Live in the Bay Area, CA, USA, boat in Turkey
                            D-Marin @ Turgutreis in Bodrum/Turkey
                            [email protected]
                            [email protected]

                            Comment


                              #15
                              The switch does allow combining the batteries and yes, certain models of ACR do allow you to lock it on or off.

                              Also, it would take a matter of three minutes to swap batteries from one spot to another as a last resort.
                              Wet'ever
                              1989 Avanti 2955
                              460 Cobra

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X