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VHF Antenna Choices and Length on 2858 Radar Arch-gctid805613

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    VHF Antenna Choices and Length on 2858 Radar Arch-gctid805613

    Hello group, I find too many choices for some VHF antennas and want to see what others decided, I'm not sure I need twin 8' antennas off the sides of the radar arc. Thinking about 2 4' masts, and I may need an extension cable form the port side antenna to get to the lower helm radio. There is no room in the tube from the fly bridge.
    Brett & Elise, Sammy + Wilson
    New Addition - 2002 Trophy 2002WA FF Optimax 135
    GO HAWKS!

    #2
    "aluxury1" post=805613 wrote:
    Hello group, I find too many choices for some VHF antennas and want to see what others decided, I'm not sure I need twin 8' antennas off the sides of the radar arc. Thinking about 2 4' masts, and I may need an extension cable form the port side antenna to get to the lower helm radio. There is no room in the tube from the fly bridge.
    The only real reason for the longer whips is to gain the height for a greater line of sight, longer range of the VHF radio. Since you already have the height with your radar arch, I would use two 32" stainless steel antenna.

    Do you have or will you be getting AIS? If you get an actual AIS radio(s), they use the same antenna. But if you want to use the dAISy like I did, you will need to add another antenna for the best results. (...though, some have used an antenna cable splitter to run both off one.)

    My 2 cents.
    "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
    MMSI: 367637220
    HAM: KE7TTR
    TDI tech diver
    BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
    Kevin

    Comment


      #3
      Are the stainless whips better performance or just more indestructable? The 3 VHF's I currently own are not AIS but it sounds like a good idea down the road, or at least a Epirb


      Attached files

      Brett & Elise, Sammy + Wilson
      New Addition - 2002 Trophy 2002WA FF Optimax 135
      GO HAWKS!

      Comment


        #4
        The antenna's gain determines the radiated pattern and max distance. In most cases gain is directly related to antenna length. Sailboats use short whip antennas because they heel. If they had a high gain antenna while heeled they my not be able to communicate with far stations. Powerboats don't normally heel, so high gain antennas are used.

        Here's a good article: https://www.westmarine.com/WestAdvis...-a-VHF-Antenna
        1999 3788, Cummins 270 "Freedom"
        2013 Boston Whaler 130 SS
        Anacortes, WA
        Isla Verde, PR

        Comment


          #5
          "aluxury1" post=805628 wrote:
          Are the stainless whips better performance or just more indestructable? The 3 VHF's I currently own are not AIS but it sounds like a good idea down the road, or at least a Epirb
          We are talking three different animals: EPIRB, DSC and AIS.

          An EPIRB is a good back-up, but for a different purpose. It is STRICTLY used in a life and death circumstance.

          DSC - Digital Select Calling - is a way to communicate with boats and USCG both in the event of an emergency, and to communicate with another DSC boat digitally through your VHF, so other boats won't know you are connecting. DSC is based around an MMSI number that is tied to your boat and radio, and it is used for 2 purposes. The first is for use in an emergency; the little red emergency/distress button on the radio. When pressed, DSC sends out your MMSI number and your location, and every boat within your VHF range will accept that information and pass it to an ever growing network. Only the USCG can cancel that signal, which only happens when they receive it. But when they receive it, because the number is registered to your boat, the USCG can see your location, who owns it, what it looks like, and any other information you wrote into your MMSI application. The second is to call other DSC boat by digital signal rather than by voice.

          AIS is very different. It has two features. The first is to receive AIS information. Once connected to your chart plotter, all AIS transmitting vessels will show up on your chartplotter. The information includes the name of the vessel, destination, speed and the direction it is steering. So, if you are sitting in the path of a tanker heading toward you, you can either call them by name on your VHF radio, or you can use the information received from their AIS to get out of their way.

          The second feature of AIS is to send out your information, like the tanker did. Personally, I only have AIS reception on my boat, as I have no desire to show other boats where I am fishing. Also, many international recreational boats - like sailboats - opt not to broadcast their location and destination to avoid the possibility of piracy.

          The West Marine article Norton Rider highlighted is very well written. dB has to do with how strong your signal can be ....up to 25W. But it also states that height is more of a determining factor than signal strength. The big question then is whether you will be in a high traffic area where you will be crossing channels with other boats. A stronger dB antenna will send a stronger signal, but it will also pick up more chatter. The squelch control can cut most of that out, but because the line-of-sight is the same for a 3dB, 6dB or 9dB antenna, antenna selection all comes back to how high it is and how clear you want your signal to be.
          "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
          MMSI: 367637220
          HAM: KE7TTR
          TDI tech diver
          BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
          Kevin

          Comment


            #6
            I had a SS whip on my 2858, it came apart, not sure why. I installed a 4 ft. fiberglass, outstanding reception.
            Jeff & Tara (And Ginger too)
            Lake Havasu City, AZ
            |
            Current: 2008 Playcraft 2400 MCM 350 Mag B3
            2000 Bayliner 3388 Cummins 4bta 250s (SOLD 2020)
            2000 Bayliner 2858 MCM 7.4 MPI B3 (SOLD 2018)
            2007 Bayliner 305 MCM twin 350 Mag B3s (SOLD 2012)
            2008 Bayliner 289 MCM 350 Mag Sea Core B3 (SOLD 2009)
            And 12 others...
            In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. 7-2-10

            Comment


              #7
              "Jeffw" post=805648 wrote:
              I had a SS whip on my 2858, it came apart, not sure why. I installed a 4 ft. fiberglass, outstanding reception.
              I've had all three, a 32" SS, a 4 and 8' fiberglass, and except for height, I found very little difference between them.

              Now, if we were talking VHF radios, that's a whole different topic.
              "B on D C", is a 1989 2459 Trophy Offshore HT, OMC 5.7L, Cobra OD, Yamaha 15hp kicker. Lots of toys! I'm no mechanic, just a blue water sailer and woodworker who loves deep sea fishing.
              MMSI: 367637220
              HAM: KE7TTR
              TDI tech diver
              BoD Puget Sound Anglers North Olympic Peninsula Chapter
              Kevin

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks guys. Since I don't plan on being offshore with this boat, I was looking for good performance and convenience because I have several bridges in the river to contend with and thinking I probly need to put any antenna down, so there is a 9db antenna here, and I am thinking of using an automatic antenna switch, 1 antenna, 2 radios, makes sense to me. Pacific Aerials LongReach Pro 9dB 8.2' VHF Antenna

                VHF 2.5m (8.2') UltraGlass Colinear Antenna

                A high gain antenna which gives exceptional performance - essential equipment for boats which need to contact more distant stations.

                Pro Series Antennas are a breakthrough: the only marine antennas in the world which can be removed and remounted on the boat at the user's convenience. The cable is hardwired to the Pro Series mount, so the antenna can be removed without pulling or cutting the cable.

                LongReach Pro Series antennas are superbly finished, with glossy UltraGlass and stainless steel ferrules to enhance the appearance and strength of the antenna. LongReach Pro Series antennas are designed for customers who demand the best.

                LongReach Pro Series antennas must be used with LongReach Pro Series Mounts, which give the options of side, deck or pipe mounting your antenna.


                Attached files

                Brett & Elise, Sammy + Wilson
                New Addition - 2002 Trophy 2002WA FF Optimax 135
                GO HAWKS!

                Comment

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