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Do you re-seal hardware just because ?-gctid802456

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    Do you re-seal hardware just because ?-gctid802456

    So I have a question.

    Last year when my boat was out (6 months in and 6 out) I noticed a broken off swim grid support bolt that is under water. I replaced it as well as the other screw on that bracket. The other screw was half eroded away when I replaced it (I know electrolysis is a good possibility). They are both directly under my kicker which hangs off the swim grid so I figured after 10 years of that bouncing it took its toll.

    On this years list of to-do items before I put it back into the water was replace all swim grid support bolts that are under water. I removed one today and it was perfect shape. I figure it can't hurt to reseal it anyways but then I started looking - where do i start and stop? Trim tabs 6-7 screws each, sounder 4 screws, swim grid 8 screws, speed paddle wheel 2 screws, etc. These do not look fun to chip out and then remove with half dozen layers of anti-fouling paint covering the heads.

    How far do you go on these "maybe I should do them items" ? Am I just going to have hrs of work and the chance of a leak if I screw something up trying to reseal "just because" ? Most of the screws just go in fiberglass so am I risking stripping threads ? Would you reseal underwater hardware and such on a 10 year old boat just because or not open that can of worms until you have a problem (ie my bolt head gone) ?

    Thanks

    Dave
    Dave
    Nanaimo, BC

    2005 242
    5.7/Bravo II

    #2
    Dave, I'm resealing everything I remove and yes some things I have backed the screws out, applied 5100 and run them back in. That stuff dries to almost hard rubber texture and in addition to eliminating sources of "capillary" water intrusion will also add strength to attachments. Some will say it's borderline "anal" but others say you can't be too thorough. It boils down to how much time you are willing/ have to address details. Some things I'm not touching so it's al up to the individual. I maintain and crew '60's vintage helicopters and have the "can't be too overcautious" mindset. Sometimes what we do won't hurt anything but can be debated on how much it will help.

    Dave
    Dave
    Restoring/ upgrading: 1990 Ciera Sunbridge 2655 ST, "One Particular Harbour"
    5.7 Mercruiser Alpha 1 Gen 1 (my floating retirement villa if it doesn't kill me first)
    Sold:
    1995 SeaPro 210 C/C "Hydro-Therapy"
    Mariner 150
    Towing with:
    2002 Ford F 350 7.3L Super Duty
    Near High Rock Lake, N.C.

    Comment


      #3
      My personal opinion is that sealant is a wearable item. Over time, between the sun, cold, twisting, exposure to elements it can become compromised. We have all seen it all to often where a transom will rot, or a radar arch or bow pulpit. Those are 3 of the areas that have the most stress. On my last 3055 I removed the bow pulpit and radar arch resealed everything. Personally I attach nothing to my transom. Trim tabs are already there but that is it.
      Phil, Vicky, Ashleigh & Sydney
      1998 3055 Ciera
      (yes, a 1998)
      Previous boat: 1993 3055
      Dream boat: 70' Azimut or Astondoa 72
      Sea Doo XP
      Sea Doo GTI SE
      Life is short. Boats are cool.
      The family that plays together stays together.
      Vice Commodore: Bellevue Yacht Club

      Comment


        #4
        The boat I bought became a major project because the previous owner didn't use sealant on the screws holding the fish finder transducer. Then when the garboard drain screws needed to be redone, no sealant was used there either. This is what the transom ply looked like after splitting the two sheets of ply apart. Needless to say I am a firm believer in re- sealing ALL fasteners. -Tom.




        1977 Saratoga Sunbridge 2550. A project that I hope will be done by the time I retire. See the gory details here- https://www.baylinerownersclub.org/f...ld-gctid659768

        Comment


          #5
          The bayliner manual.says reseal through hulls at least every ten years. I just redid the through hulls on my 1979. That's almost 40 years and I don't think they had ever been done. My opinion is yeah things should be resealed but I don't know about every ten years however it wouldn't hurt especially if it's looking bad.

          On my 3450 I just bought the sealer is falling out of the rudder housings so obviously it should have been redone in years past and it only has 3 0 ( not 40 ) years on it. Things need to be resealed nothing is going to last forever.
          1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
          twin 454's
          MV Mar-Y-Sol
          1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
          Twin chevy 350's inboard
          Ben- Jamin
          spokane Washington

          Comment


            #6
            There are lots of screws on our boat. Inside. Outside. LOTS! I started a thread in the motor yacht section about Capt Tolleys creeping crack repair. I don't have much experience with it. The stuff I supposed to seek the leaks. What would be wrong with hitting the screw and surrounding area with the heat gun and putting a drop of Capt Tolleys on each screw?
            2000 4788 w Cummins 370's, underhulls, swim step hull extension
            12' Rendova center console with 40HP Yamaha
            MV Kia Orana
            Currently Enjoying the PNW

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