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    Volvo 280 tools-gctid347312

    This spring I am going to need tools for my 280 and need to know what I must have and what I can use that will work and where to buy them cheap if possible.

    I have been studying the shop manual and BOC library and know it will not be easy to rebuild

    I want to start buying some tools now.Any info or advise is appreciated thanks.

    #2
    I think that some OEM service and work shop manuals are linked to in the BOC Library.

    If you go to the BOC Vault, there are links to threads on this subject.

    BTW, Have no fears..... this will be easier than what you are thinking it will be!

    Take your time, go slow, read some of the threads linked to via my Vault thread.

    Use the Volvo Penta OEM work shop manual... not Seloc or Clymers, unless just for the pictures.

    Too many errors in the Seloc and Clymers.

    Use the BOC email feature if you want to contact me..... I don't mind one bit!

    You'll need a good quality set of American size:
    • wrenches and sockets.
    • hex key wrench set.
    • extended loooooooong needle nose pliers with the tips modified and tweaked inward to fit the snap ring eyelets. This will work for the transmisson main seal, and for your PDS snap rings.
    • small diameter punch for the eccentric piston detent pin "Spring Pin" removal.
    • a single prop line cutter/spacer with the line cutter removed, cleaned up and polished. (this will be your eccentric piston seal installation tool.... perfect diameter)
    • for the prop-shaft and main seals, you can be creative, or have some fixtures machined for you.
    • a good quality feeler gauge set.
    • a good quality dial indicator caliper and 0-1" micrometer.
    • a bench style wire wheel and safety glasses.
    • access to a hydraulic shop press and misc fixtures.
    • an extra vertical shaft spline coupler that becomes your bench vice transmission jig/fixture.
    • a good quality torque wrench.
    • a good quality spring scale and line.
    • either a star or hex key socket for the main drive gear/yoke fastener (depends on which one you find being used).
    • a puller tool for the prop shaft bearing carrier. (you can make this tool for a few dollars..... see photo)
    • Merc's QuickSliver "Perfect Seal" or Permatex #3. I prefer "Perfect Seal".
    • a small make-shift hook tool for removing the main drive gear seal.
    • a sharp small chisel point tool for cutting and removing the eccentric piston seal.
    • a small propane torch for applying heat to the transmission gear case prior to removing the four clamping collar fasteners. Heat is your friend here.... so use it! (if these were to become rounded out, get hold of me.... I'll explain the next procedure that will keep you from ruining this $380-400 clamping collar) No Oxy-Acet.... too hot.... too much oxygen!




    Below are photos of the jig that holds the transmission in the bench vice, a puller tool for the prop shaft bearing carrier, and the small punch needed for the eccentric piston spring pin that secures the shift detent pin.

    The jig: nothing more than an extra short coupler welded to a piece of angle iron. If you need a coupler, they're a dime/dozen...... I have extras.

    The puller tool: nothing more than 7/16" NC grade #8 threaded rod, a 1/2" steel plate drilled for the bolt pattern and center prop shaft, and some grade # hex nuts.

    I prefer to use the puller rather than hammer against the prop shaft carrier and bearing with a slide hammer.

    The drift punch: not easy to find in this diameter..... you may need to have one turned down.

    Too small, and it tends to penetrate the spring pin ID..... Too large, and it won't pass through the detent pin ID.

    Attached files [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/650145=24213-Prop shaft carrier puller tool 1.jpg[/img] [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/650145=24212-Trans fixture.jpg[/img] [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/650145=24214-Volvo Eccentric piston spring pin.jpg[/img]
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

    Comment


      #3
      Not really any special tools needed, I use a fish scale for setting up the dbl bearing box. A slap hammer for pulling the prop shaft, good set of allen wrenches, feeler guages, micrometer for measuring shims. Don't forget to add a lot of patience and heat when needed.

      I'm sure rick will add some

      Good luck with the rebuild :go-

      See that he already got you while I was typing, some day I'll learn to use all my fingers

      Comment


        #4
        Wingman wrote:
        Not really any special tools needed, .................................... Don't forget to add a lot of patience and heat when needed.

        1.... I'm sure rick will add some

        2... See that he already got you while I was typing, some day I'll learn to use all my fingers
        Yes.... ditto the heat!

        1.... Well, I'm doing this from memory, so if I've forgotten anything, please chime in!

        2.... Yes, and like the Adams Family, use all eleven of them! I do!
        Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
        2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
        Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
        Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
        Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

        Comment


          #5
          Wow thats great guys I dont have to spend a pile on special tools.I went to Marineparts express and they have 35 tools for the 280 Volvo,Thanks Rick for the great info.

          Comment


            #6
            You're welcome.

            If you do get into the bearing box and/or end up setting rolling torque via string line and scale...., I'd suggest a 0 to 10 lb scale that is more accurate than a fish scale.

            Perhaps one like this, or a digital, in either metric or US.... whichever you want to use.



            .
            Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
            2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
            Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
            Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
            Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

            Comment


              #7
              stripped bolt tool and lots of ratchet extensions. you'll need this to get your clamping ring bolts loose. and patience. nothing can be forced.

              Comment


                #8
                Mattmm wrote:
                stripped bolt tool and lots of ratchet extensions. you'll need this to get your clamping ring bolts loose. and patience. nothing can be forced.
                Yes very true and if you'll read the threads in the BOC Vault you'll notice how often I suggest using heat on the main gear case where the thread inserts are housed. Do this prior to removing these four cap screws. Most often this will save you from rounding out a hex socket.

                The "A" and later transmissons don't pose this issue.... usually!

                Remember.... these are American size bolts... not Metric!

                OH.......... and Do NOT try to chase any thread inserts with a cutting tap. If you must chase threads, use a roll from tap, or a very worn out cutting tap with oil.

                If you were to hook an insert with a sharp crisp cutting tap, you'll be in trouble!
                Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                Comment


                  #9
                  Ill look around and get a good dial scale thanks.Oh I will be getting into it all.The upper gear unit had no oil in it,The steering fork is shot,the whole leg is loose and the tilt trim is not working.I hope things inside are in better shape.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    On the heat thing, I've found propylene gas (yellow bottle) works way better than regular propane. The reason for this is that is seems to apply heat quicker, especially with larger thermal mass parts. This allows you to heat the part you want to heat, without putting very much heat into the surrounding parts which may be heat averse (a huge advantage!).

                    If you're like me, you'll never use propane again. Do adjust the length of time you heat for though, propylene will be much quicker!

                    Chay

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Chay, are you refering to Map Gas.............. the yellow bottles?

                      That's what I use also....... It's a tad bit hotter than Propane, yet not hot enough to damage the aluminum.
                      Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                      2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                      Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                      Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                      Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Mattmm wrote:
                        stripped bolt tool and lots of ratchet extensions. you'll need this to get your clamping ring bolts loose. and patience. nothing can be forced.
                        Thanks, got it.The stripped bolt tool I dont have and I wont cheap out on this tool.I will see what Snap On has.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Prairie Puffin wrote:
                          Thanks, got it.The stripped bolt tool I dont have and I wont cheap out on this tool. I will see what Snap On has.
                          Prairie Puffin, just a word to the wise here, if you use the heat like suggested, I doubt that you'll need that tool.

                          However, if you should stip the hex out, and can't remove one or two of these cap screws, DO NOT allow anyone to drill them out.

                          If you should run into this, get hold of me and I'll explain why and what to do next.
                          Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                          2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                          Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                          Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                          Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Will do Rick.I have tapped cast aluminum before and it wasn't pretty it seems to never chase the original threads and the bolt is sloppy after.What do you guys use as a good bolt extractor.The kit is sold by Snap On for $110.00 I need a good set for other stuff anyway.A socket style kit is this what I need like the single one shown?

                            Attached files [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/650743=24350-20866.jpg[/img] [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/650743=24349-24916.jpg[/img]

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Prairie Puffin, since this is your thread, I guess it's OK if we elaborate on this from the original tool questions.

                              You know me..... I like to keep things as short as possible! :right

                              On a serious note, I'd like it if all of us could do our own work on these. It would save lots of money and would encourage us to do the preventative maintenance.

                              These are very easy to work on, but there are some Do's and Don'ts that I try my best to explain.

                              I routinely see the costly mistakes that people make, and it always ends up costing them much more then had they done it correctly in the first place.

                              The "Heat" for example.... if it proves to have been unnecessary, then what are we out? Nothing but a few minutes and a few cents worth of Map Gas.

                              But if it did prove to have been necessary (and we did NOT use heat), then we can be out the cost of new parts and/or machine work.

                              NOT replacing PDS bearings is another one. You've probably seen some of the photos that I've posted. Not pretty!

                              All of the owners with single bearing PDS (and this includes the Fords and some of the later GM V-8's) can replace these from AFT.

                              They do NOT need to pull the engine.... yet they defer this, and pay the price later on.

                              The owners of V-8's w/ double bearings must pull the engine, but they too defer this and pay the price later.

                              The little eccentric piston detent spring pin for another example.

                              I read where guys can not remove the detent as to replace the eccentric piston seal. The reason for this was because the last guy in did not remove the previous spring pin from the piston. There is no way to remove the current spring pin if a previous pin is down inside of the bore.

                              This likely cost these owners a new or used shift mechanism. :sorrow:

                              So it's often the little things that can get us into trouble.... and these are so easy to avoid if we just educate ourselves a bit.

                              That's my goal if I can help!

                              Prairie Puffin wrote:
                              Will do Rick.
                              • 1 wrote:
                              • I have tapped cast aluminum before and it wasn't pretty it seems to never chase the original threads and the bolt is sloppy after.
                              • What do you guys use as a good bolt extractor.



                              • 1 wrote:
                              • Well, this is part of why I caution everyone when working on these.

                                First.... there are only two actual aluminum female threads (that I can think of right now) on these drives. The rest are all "Thread Inserts".

                                The inserts are pretty darn tough if we treat them correctly.... hence my comment re; NOT chasing them with a cutting tap. A sharp thread cutting tap may hook the insert and will want to wind it up. Often the tap will stick and will want to back or wind the insert out.

                                Heat is your friend when initially removing any of these fasteners, IMO.
                              • Several options depending on how/where and whether broken or cut and/or machined out, etc.

                                If broken, EDM is about the only option (EDM = Electric Discharge Machining) unless we're left with enough bolt shank to grab onto later!

                                If the hex is rounded out then Milling the head/shank out is an option (not drilling).

                                Drilling is NOT an option unless you plan to purchase a new $380+ clamping collar..... and I hate to see anyone have to do that!




                              Here are some images that may help explain what we can run into on a Pre-A transmission, such as your 280.

                              Any of these transmssions are considered "wet area" bolt bores.... and are prone to corrosion..... hence the HEAT being used when removing them.

                              And BTW, heat doesn't always work!

                              First one shows how the cap screw heads are pretty much in-set and flush with the surrounding aluminum surface. Not much room for any type of extractor tool.

                              Second one shows the delicate washer shoulder that seals this area off. These must remain pristine.

                              This is why we don't dare drill these out, even on a good machine shop drill press.

                              Instead, we have these milled out on a milling machine by a qualified machinist.

                              Further disassembly is required so the machinist can lay it flat against the machine table!

                              Third one shows the FWD pocket for the steel bearing box collar and O-ring.

                              Note the break-thru on one bolt bore. If this cap screw is sealed well at the washer shoulder, it will be OK.

                              The FWD O-ring seals off the other area.

                              Forth one is the Pre-"A" transmission steel BB showing the control collar and two O-ring grooves.

                              No special importance for the image....... just thought I'd throw it in also.

                              Not shown would be all of the control shims in this area and the two O-rings.

                              Attached files http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img] http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img] http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img] http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]
                              Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                              2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                              Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                              Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                              Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                              Comment

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