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    My brother sank his Sea Ray-gctid394980

    I need your help. My brother sank his Sea Ray.

    First, I apologize for having a brother who owns a Sea Ray, but he's my brother and I have to accept him as he is.

    Second, I'm a bit short on details. I asked my brother what engine he has; he said "it's black". I asked if he had a manual. He said, "no - it's automatic".

    It's a 5h drive to his cottage. I want to save the boat. You can assume he has nothing on hand but beer.

    What work should I plan on doing? What tools and equipment/supplies should I take?

    Here's the little that I do know:
    • A big storm took his tonneau cover off
    • The boat sank at a mooring, about 30' from shore on a sand bottom in about 3-4ft of water
    • The boat is a mid- to late- 2000's Sea Ray 18' bow rider
    • It sat in fresh water, on the bottom, for about 3 days
    • It's pumped out and on a trailer now.
    • He talked to our dad first, and Dad told him not to turn it over, not under any circumstances. My brother said he thought it was too heavy to turn over. (Really)




    Thanks in advance.

    #2
    whiskywizard wrote:
    I need your help. My brother sank his Sea Ray.

    First, I apologize for having a brother who owns a Sea Ray, but he's my brother and I have to accept him as he is.

    Second, I'm a bit short on details. I asked my brother what engine he has; he said "it's black". I asked if he had a manual. He said, "no - it's automatic".

    It's a 5h drive to his cottage. I want to save the boat. You can assume he has nothing on hand but beer.

    What work should I plan on doing? What tools and equipment/supplies should I take?

    Here's the little that I do know:
    • A big storm took his tonneau cover off
    • The boat sank at a mooring, about 30' from shore on a sand bottom in about 3-4ft of water
    • The boat is a mid- to late- 2000's Sea Ray 18' bow rider
    • It sat in fresh water, on the bottom, for about 3 days
    • It's pumped out and on a trailer now.
    • He talked to our dad first, and Dad told him not to turn it over, not under any circumstances. My brother said he thought it was too heavy to turn over. (Really)




    Thanks in advance.
    Can't pick your family :beer-

    Shop vac, several cheap ($10) department store box fans, motor oil and filter (and a funnel or oiler), new spark plugs, spark plug socket/ratchet for removing spark plugs, T-9 or WD40 (WD40 might be better for displacing water?).

    #1 priority is the engine. You'll want to remove all spark plugs, and THEN and only then turn the engine over to blow out any water. Dump a tablespoon of oil in each cylinder and turn over again. Drain ALL the oil out of the block, then drain some more. Replace with the oil you brought - that will be thrown out too. I'd disconnect major connectors like the cannon plug, spark plug wires, etc. and WD-40 just about everything on and around the engine.

    All carpet needs to be shop vacuumed out, bilges, etc., and you need to keep a ton of ventilation on the whole boat for several days. Remove all cushions, wring out. How high did the water get in the boat?

    Comment


      #3
      OH, the number of wise cracks I could fit into this thread....

      Anyway, since this is a technical discussion, let's have at it. We don't know if it's an outboard, 2 stroke or an inboard/outdrive, so the limitations I'm talking about will be generic.

      1 Most long term damage will be to the electrical equipment. It depends on how many hours you want to invest in his boat, but every single electrical connection should be taken apart, blown off, and then sprayed with De-Ox-It or a similar electrical conductor cleaning agent, then reassembled. Every one. Including the ones under the instrument binnacle.

      2 Outboard engine: Drain all fluids, gas tank, drive lower unit, and take out the plugs. Spray WD-40 or another rust inhibitor in the cylinders right away, and crank the engine over BY HAND a few times. If there is a lot of deposits in the cylinders, clean with Varsol first, and get the carbs as clean as you can get them. Remove the fuel filter. Flush the fuel system, starting from the tank with Varsol, do the lines, then the carbs. Get a new fuel filter and air filter, and install. Clean the engine with Varsol in a siphon spray, replace the lower drive fluid, put the plugs back in and give it a try.e

      3. Tilt trim system: Drain old fluid, drain fluid from trim servos on the outdrive/lower unit. Blow out the lines while you have it off, and operate the drive up and down a few times by hand to clear as much of the crud as you can. If the reservoir was full, it should be drained out from the reservoir bottle, and not through the lines to the servos. Refill and purge the air.

      4 Inboard engine: Drain all fluids, remove carb and spark plugs. Get a shop vacuum and a small piece of clear plastic hose that will fit in the spark plug hole. Tape the plastic hose onto the end of the crevice tool attached to the vacuum. Use the tube to get as much water out of the cylinders as possible. Once you have all the cylinders vacuumed, go in with compressed air, and blow it out. Spray WD-40 into the cylinders liberally. Reinstall new plugs. Remove the oil fill cap and fashion a connector to the output of your vacuum so that you are pushing warm air into via oil fill into the engine. If there is a breather on the same valve cover, block that one off, and leave the other one open. If there is no other breather, you can block the one breather off. Leave the vacuum run for 4-6 hours pushing warm air into the block. This will evap much but not all of the water inside the engine. Refill with fresh oil and a new filter. Have carb cleaned or rebuilt, and reinstall. Crank the engine for 20 seconds, several times with the plugs out to discharge any remaining water and prime the oil galleries. Reinstall plugs, get a fresh water supply to the outdrive and try to start it. If it has electronic ignition, you may have to replace that. If it's older with a points condensor, just clean under the cap and blow out with air.

      5: Upholstery and carpet are marine, and can take a fair amount of water ingress. I would just wash it with fresh water, and be done with it unless the seats start to smell from mildew. If that happens, plan on replacing all the foam in the upholstery soon.

      Comment


        #4
        First thing is if its going to include an insurance claim he needs to take pictures and take notes.

        Next you need to get the water out of the engine and drive asap and run the engine enough to get the water out of the engine.

        Your dad was right dont turn over the engine. Remove the spark plug then pump out the water by turning over the engine. Problem #1is engine may not turn over due to wet starter. Either dry out the starter first before attempting to turn over or replace the starter. I am going to contend its going to need replaced.

        With plugs removed and engine oil changed turn over engine. Pump out water in cylinders. Dont forget to check or replace thethe oil in the outdrive.

        You will need enough oil to change rhe oil in the engine a couple of times until it stays clean of water.

        You will need to dry the ignition system what ever that will intail. I would might be inclined to spray some diesel into the cylinders before i run it.

        The engine needs to be ran asap and oil changed a couple of times so that rust soesnt build up. Spray every thing with wd40 gonna need a few cans.

        Dont forget oil for the drive lift and tabs. Most importan dry and clean every thing.

        Most lonely gauges are already gone. You may need to hot wire and or use a different key switch to get things to work.

        Tools? Plug wrench screwdrivers lots of oil. Might not hurt to run some marvel mistery oil in the first couple of changes. Several new oil filters.

        Clean all oil tanks and gas tanks before firing over. I would maybe fun the engine from a seperate fuel tank to get it going as to not bring crap gas into the engine. If its carburated you will need to remove and clean float bowl on carb.
        1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
        twin 454's
        MV Mar-Y-Sol
        1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
        Twin chevy 350's inboard
        Ben- Jamin
        spokane Washington

        Comment


          #5
          Most of all go find a bayliner decal when hes not looking put it on hks searay boat. It will now ne safe for future use. I like the vacuum idea from doc although not sure its necessary.
          1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
          twin 454's
          MV Mar-Y-Sol
          1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
          Twin chevy 350's inboard
          Ben- Jamin
          spokane Washington

          Comment


            #6
            Engine oil and filters - enough for 2 or 3 oil changes

            Fresh fuel and fuel filters

            outdrive oil

            fogging oil

            spark plugs

            new battery

            new starter

            new alternator

            fuses

            Basic hand tools to complete the above, and a good supply of cuss words....

            Remove the old battery. Remove the plugs and check the electrodes for water intrusion into the cylinder. If no water, I would fog the cylinders. Then, install the new battery and spin the motor (if it doesn't spin, replace the starter and alternator). Next, after you find the engine spins freely, and you're sure there is no water remaining in the cylinders, wait a while (have a beer). Now, change the oil, oil filter, and fuel filters, drain the old fuel and replace with fresh. You may have to crack the carb open, as there may be water inside).

            Replace the plugs and attempt to fire the engine. If she fires, DO NOT go above idle- you just want to ensure she's still alive. Change the oil again. Fire her up again. Change the oil again.

            Comment


              #7
              So on top of buying a SR, he also doesn't have any insurance? WTF?!?

              Search the internet for "pickling an engine." Follow those instructions to possibly save the motor. Three days in water, and now it's gonna be a couple days out...might not be able to save it. Pickling should be done immediately.

              The interior needs to be dried out as quickly as possible. Remove fabric from cushions, put the foam and fabric in the sun. Remove carpets and dry. Etc. All non-sealed electrical items will be damaged. You can open starters, alternators, and other items and clean them with WD-40 first, then with contact cleaner.

              What year is the boat?

              Comment


                #8
                FWIW: Take the boat to a shop and let them try to resurrect it. If your brother is really that ignorant about boats/etc.. you will be far better off letting him continue to shell out $$. The main reason I say this is - once you leave you are bound to have missed something, or something unexpectedly failed and he will still need to take it to the shop. You are just plain better off taking it to the shop and let them go thru the boat - and build a relationship with the shop.

                There are other systems in the boat that may need attention - alternator, bilge pumps ( which clearly did not work ). 10 hours of driving, in this case, will only be the first of several trips.

                Dont worry about the $$ - Searay owners are used to that.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Marine alt and starters should be able to withstand a dunking for a few days and still work a little while. It depends on if bearings got water ingress. They'll likely work for a while, but will fail later on in the season. For now, the starter should crank, and the alt will likely put out current until the bearings die.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    So which one of you is adopted?

                    Mike was this suppose to be posted on the first of April?

                    Ken
                    300SD all options sold.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      SwampNut wrote:
                      So on top of buying a SR, he also doesn't have any insurance? WTF?!?

                      Search the internet for "pickling an engine." Follow those instructions to possibly save the motor. Three days in water, and now it's gonna be a couple days out...might not be able to save it. Pickling should be done immediately.

                      The interior needs to be dried out as quickly as possible. Remove fabric from cushions, put the foam and fabric in the sun. Remove carpets and dry. Etc. All non-sealed electrical items will be damaged. You can open starters, alternators, and other items and clean them with WD-40 first, then with contact cleaner.

                      What year is the boat?
                      Dont pickle the engine if you can get it started.

                      For the first two oil changes add two liters of varsol to the oil to actually overfill it. That way the crank will splash oil up into the top of the crankcase and clean out the oil/water mix that is now up there. Do not run above idle with this mixture.

                      The sooner this is done the better.

                      If you pickle it it will still have to be run within two weeks to save it.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        pugetmike makes a great point....

                        'There are other systems in the boat that may need attention - alternator, bilge pumps ( which clearly did not work ). 10 hours of driving, in this case, will only be the first of several trips.'

                        If this is insured it is very likely better to let the 'experts' handle this project which will grow in time and expense rather quickly.

                        If there is no insurance it is best to calmly weigh the likely value of a rasied and slavaged mid 2000's 18 foot bowrider vs the cost , risk and work of salvaging it.

                        Just in parts, lubricants, and travel expenses this will easly go into the $1,000's - so perhaps consider what the final product is worth at the end of that long journey before you start.

                        Around these parts that year and size of boat in excellent shape does not command much of a price at this time.

                        Hope this helps
                        Northport NY

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Mike, I can't tell when you are serious or joking, but I'll take this one as being serious.

                          Most importantly, IMO, would be to take the necessary steps in order to get the engine running.

                          You need engine heat to boil the water from behind the piston rings.

                          The bearings and cam followers (if 4 stroke) will clear themselves almost immediately upon start up, and during several oil changes.

                          The starter motor is destine to fail unless disassembled and cleaned out.

                          May as well install a new one right now.

                          Fresh lake or river water is certainly much better than if salt water.

                          .
                          Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                          2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                          Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                          Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                          Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Mike over the summer our marina gets about 5 of these either cottagers or boats right in their slips. The marina follows the same process for carbed in boards.

                            Drain the oil

                            Remove the spark plugs

                            Take an air line with a blow gun and blow the water out of each cylinder. (you can do the alternator, carb and starter)

                            Turn motor over (throw some rags over the spark plug holes) 5 seconds. Water will come shooting out.

                            Change filter

                            Fill with oil

                            Turn motor over 5 sec rest and do again

                            Check oil for water

                            Clean spark plugs with quick start check gap.

                            The fuel tank might have to be emptied before you can do the next step, there is a special filter that you can buy that will separate the water from the fuel and make the fuel reusable. I saw it demonstrated on todays boating a few weeks ago.

                            Put spark plugs in try to start, if it starts let it run for about 10 seconds (it should start, might have to use quick start).

                            Check oil, most likely you will have to change it now, (not filter)

                            Start the motor again let it warm up, shut off and check oil, (change oil and filter)

                            Start it again let it warm up and do the same thing till the oil stays nice and clean.

                            You might have to do this up to 5 times but it sure beats the price of a new motor.

                            Ken
                            300SD all options sold.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Hey, a good first step would be to take the starter off and dry it out. It will hold water long after the engine has dried, DAHIK. If it wasn't in the drink for long, it might be still be saved, but probably not.

                              Comment

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