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    Gas Tank Safety-gctid389465

    I have an unknown quantity of gas in the factory 120-gallon fuel tank in my '83 Contessa which probably needs a sending-unit replacement given the fuel gauge isn't working, but that fix is for another day. I'm about to pull the engine and outdrive for repowering to an O/B, so for safety purposes should I provide some sorta alternate grounding for the tank? If so, any ideas how best to handle it? Thnx.

    Wayne

    #2
    Wayne, the fuel tank will/should have a Negative conductor attached to it. If not, I'd certainly add one.

    With the bow raised, and with the anti-siphon valve tempoarily removed, and with pick-up tube screen clean, you can draw the old fuel safely from the tank.

    I'd strongly suggest that you NOT use an electric pump.

    Instead, connect a long hose to the fuel tank fitting, and begin a siphon using the Tempo Oil Boy, or another form of an oil change vacuum device.

    .
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

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      #3
      2850Bounty...

      Thnx for the quick reply. Yep, I'm gonna eventually drain all the old gas outta the tank, and I intend to use a siphon protocol vice an electrical fuel pump. Since the tank is grounded to the engine block, once that's removed should I provide a temp ground (perhaps a wire from the tank to a grounding rod driven into the ground where the boat is dry slipped on the trailer)? Once she's ready to go back into the water, are there alternatives to grounding the tank other than to an engine? Thnx.

      Wayne

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        #4
        Grounding the tank during a maintenance evolution like pulling an engine isn't necessary. You should have your power disconnected during that anyhow (or battery removed) so sparks won't be a problem.

        The ground on a gas tank isn't for safety, it's so your gauge will work. A sending unit is simply a variable resistor in your tank. Believe it or not... you're actually providing voltage through your gasoline while going down the road. As the tank fills or drains, that resistor varies the ground that the voltage in the gauge is looking for.

        Crazy idea when you think about it too much, but it works.
        Custom CNC Design And Dash Panels

        iBoatNW

        1980 CHB Europa 42 Trawler- "Honey Badger"

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          #5
          bayloon2 wrote:
          Yep, I'm gonna eventually drain all the old gas outta the tank, and I intend to use a siphon protocol vice an electrical fuel pump.
          Well, be careful.

          Wayne, if you do not already own one of these, you should, IMO.



          A good siphon should remove the fuel at a decent rate.

          These work with fuel, oil, water, Ethylene Glycol, and more.

          Great for purging a closed cooling system too.

          I've even used one to pull the water from a toilet that was being removed. No spills.

          .
          Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
          2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
          Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
          Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
          Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

          Comment


            #6
            SomeSailor...

            Thnx for the education. Not a day goes by I don't learn something new about boats and boating. I was mostly concerned about lightening or static electricity making mischief with gas fumes. All the batteries are outta the boat now, so I won't obsess about unwanted spontaneous combustion. Thnx again.

            Wayne

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              #7
              Rick...

              WHOA! Now that's a serious pump. Looks way better than the way smaller hand siphon pump I've been using to change oil. Thnx for the lead.

              Wayne

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