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    Adding a fuse panel...-gctid388847

    I want to add a fuse panel inside my engine bay that will not remain constantly powered. It will only be for about 8 fuses. I think putting it there will make wiring easy for some additional items.

    the question is, where should I pull the power from?

    #2
    Gilligan wrote:
    I want to add a fuse panel inside my engine bay that will not remain constantly powered. It will only be for about 8 fuses. I think putting it there will make wiring easy for some additional items.

    the question is, where should I pull the power from?
    There is only one option............... the "Common" terminal.
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

    Comment


      #3
      Rick must have been in a hurry! Usually he has more to say.......nthego:

      The common terminal on the back of the MBSS (main battery selector switch) has 12V+ when the switch is in any position except "OFF".

      You should install a fuse or circuit breaker close to this switch sized to the wire that feeds your remote fuse panel. This will protect the wire in case it gets shorted to ground. An unfused wire will deliver the total battery fault current till the wire burns up!

      From Table IV of ABYC E11

      For wire with 105┬░ C insulation rating Allowable Amperage of conductors for systems under 50 volts

      Conductor size AWG Outside Engine Spaces Inside Engine Spaces

      18 20 17.0

      16 25 21.3

      14 35 29.8

      12 45 38.3

      10 60 51.0

      That chart didn't paste too well, but the first number is the wire size (AWG), the second number is the amperage allowed outside of engine spaces, the last number is the amperage allowed inside engine spaces.

      Comment


        #4
        CPSS wrote:
        Rick must have been in a hurry! Usually he has more to say.......nthego:

        The common terminal on the back of the MBSS (main battery selector switch) has 12V+ when the switch is in any position except "OFF".

        You should install a fuse or circuit breaker close to this switch sized to the wire that feeds your remote fuse panel. This will protect the wire in case it gets shorted to ground. An unfused wire will deliver the total battery fault current till the wire burns up!

        From Table IV of ABYC E11

        For wire with 105┬░ C insulation rating Allowable Amperage of conductors for systems under 50 volts

        Conductor size AWG Outside Engine Spaces Inside Engine Spaces

        18 20 17.0

        16 25 21.3

        14 35 29.8

        12 45 38.3

        10 60 51.0

        That chart didn't paste too well, but the first number is the wire size (AWG), the second number is the amperage allowed outside of engine spaces, the last number is the amperage allowed inside engine spaces.
        You ain't kidding... 15 cats must have Rick's tongue. :kidding

        So, the common is also labeled Feed on my switch I assume, right? Now, I'm not quite sure I'm getting your chart right. What fuse should I use if I run a size 10 wire from the MBSS the new panel?

        Comment


          #5
          Per the chart #10 in the engine bay would be rated for up to 51 Amps.

          I would fuse #10 at 30 Amps.
          Jim McNeely
          New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
          Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
          Brighton, Michigan USA
          MMSI # 367393410

          Comment


            #6
            I agree with Jim. I'm an electrician and the NEC codes say that #10 wire is good for 30 amps. The ABYC says that #10 is good for 51 amps if used inside the engine compartment. If you fuse it at 30 amps you will be safe and comply with AYBC specifications.If you have a GUEST battery selector switch the COMMON is labeled FEED

            [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/692659=28426-schematic-1_small.gif[/img]

            Comment


              #7
              CPSS wrote:
              Rick must have been in a hurry! Usually he has more to say.......nthego:
              Gilligan wrote:
              You ain't kidding... 15 cats must have Rick's tongue. :kidding
              I figure that I'd better throw in a non-Verbose post once in a while.

              Gilligan wrote:


              So, the common is also labeled Feed on my switch I assume, right?
              Common/Feed.... same thing!



              .
              Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
              2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
              Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
              Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
              Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

              Comment


                #8
                2850Bounty wrote:
                I figure that I'd better throw in a non-Verbose post once in a while.

                Common/Feed.... same thing!



                .
                Ahhh... a picture. The cats have set him free.;raseberry

                Comment


                  #9
                  CPSS wrote:
                  I agree with Jim. I'm an electrician and the NEC codes say that #10 wire is good for 30 amps. The ABYC says that #10 is good for 51 amps if used inside the engine compartment. If you fuse it at 30 amps you will be safe and comply with AYBC specifications.If you have a GUEST battery selector switch the COMMON is labeled FEED

                  http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....gif[/img]
                  You'll not find a 50 amp fuse protecting a 10 AWG wire on anything I install!Sorry, but in this case I would not go with the AYBC recommendations for overcurrent protection Vs wire size.

                  KEVIN SANDERS
                  4788 LISAS WAY - SEWARD ALASKA
                  www.transferswitch4less.com

                  Whats the weather like on our boat
                  https://www.weatherlink.com/embeddab...59665f4e4/wide


                  Where are we right now? https://maps.findmespot.com/s/36S4

                  Comment


                    #10
                    That ABYC standard is for wire rated at 105 degrees C! Most common wire is rated for something less like 105C or more commonly found is 90C wire. You can also use these wires but the current they can pass by ABYC code must comply and will be derated from the above chart info. I do not have time to find the chart right now but 30A for a #10 AWG, 90C wire is about standard.

                    I believe we all may have missed something Mike C asked for in his original post and that was a source that will not remain constantly on. Now while I agree with the above postings about the back of the MBSS for a connection and that is a not constant source if the switch is turned off, maybe Mike was asking for a source that is hot only when the key is on. If that's the case, that's a whole different response as far as where to get the power, available source current, the possible use of a higher current source and relay to gain the key on only ability, etc.

                    So, Mike C, what type of "not constantly on" power are you looking for? When would you like your buss to be powered? Just for clarification.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Nauti Knotts wrote:
                      That ABYC standard is for wire rated at 105 degrees C! Most common wire is rated for something less like 105C or more commonly found is 90C wire. You can also use these wires but the current they can pass by ABYC code must comply and will be derated from the above chart info. I do not have time to find the chart right now but 30A for a #10 AWG, 90C wire is about standard.

                      I believe we all may have missed something Mike C asked for in his original post and that was a source that will not remain constantly on. Now while I agree with the above postings about the back of the MBSS for a connection and that is a not constant source if the switch is turned off, maybe Mike was asking for a source that is hot only when the key is on. If that's the case, that's a whole different response as far as where to get the power, available source current, the possible use of a higher current source and relay to gain the key on only ability, etc.

                      So, Mike C, what type of "not constantly on" power are you looking for? When would you like your buss to be powered? Just for clarification.
                      I would like it powered when the MBSS is one 1 or 2 (or both). I will use the Common as suggested.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Good. Just wanted to be sure we didn't miss what you were truely looking for.

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