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    Macerator install-gctid388452

    I am installing a new macerator on my 2001 3055. I got questions. I have all the fittings, hoses and is wired up. How do you drill a hole in the side of the boat (without wrecking it) and what do you use to do that? Hole saw? Do you seal the edge of the hold afterwards and with what? What type of sealant for the fitting itself? Next how to route the hose to the above water line thru hull fitting? Does it need to be routed high above the pump so the dribble goes down hill running out the boat or downhill so the dribble returns to the pump? How about an inline valve with a lock so the Coast Guard doesn't fine me when in SF bay? HELP!

    #2
    Some ideas for you:

    http://www.c-brats.com/viewtopic.php?t=15343

    http://www.ericsonyachts.org/infoexc...ing-amp-Valves

    http://navitrol.com/WasteManagement.htm

    The outlet can be above or below the waterline. A "y" valve will be required to be in compliance with USCG requirements.

    When you determine the location for the outlet, you'll want to drill a pilot hole from inside the boat. Next, get your hole saw and go outside- find your pilot hole, put your drill in reverse, and place the drill bit of the hole saw into the pilot hole. Begin scoring the gelcoat with the hole saw- having the drill in reverse will give you a smoother hole thru the outer hull.

    I'd use 3M 4200 to seal the thru hull fitting.

    Comment


      #3
      Your boat came without one? I thought they were all stock. I've never seen one without it.

      Drilling in the SIDE of the boat or the transom are two different things. The side is pretty easy and fast. I very strongly recommend a Forstner bit over a hole saw. When I use a Forstner, I take no precautions on chipping and other issues. It just doesn't happen. I've drilled from the inside and from the outside, no problem. I just did an auxiliary bilge pump and drilled from the inside with no tape or any other effort.

      For above the waterline, I'd recommend 3M 101 or 4000 sealant. The stronger ones are not needed. Under the waterline I'd do 4200 on plastic and 5200 on metal. Apply your sealant to the through-hull and put it in place. Tighten down the backing nut until it starts to squeeze out, but not all the way. Let it partially cure. For the sealants with a week of cure time (4000, 4200, 5200) you would leave it for a day. For the "fast" versions of those, for a couple hours. Then tighten down.

      Comment


        #4
        And yes you need a lockable Y valve

        http://www.amazon.com/Jabsco-45490-1...8920546&sr=8-1

        Mr Coastie doesn't like to see boats without them, makes him grumpy and more inclined to look for other stuff.
        Boatless at this time

        A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including their life."

        Comment


          #5
          OK, all good advice. Yes, my boat did not come with a macerator, all the wiring is there and holes for the switches. The holding tank has two outlets, one to the pumpout and the other intended for the macerator. So... no "Y" valve is in the design and not shown on the drawings. So, how do I keep the costal boys happy. I have seen a key that locks out the power. On the 3055 that has this set up, what does it have and does the output from the pump slant down to the side of the boat or slant back towards the pump.

          Thanks you guys are great!!

          Comment


            #6
            My understanding is that a keyed switch on the macerator (or discharge pump) is suitable for the requirement to prevent accidental discharge. If you go below waterline with your discharge point (my suggestion) then you might be able to belt and suspenders your way to even better appearances if being boarded by a zip tie on the seacock in closed position.

            I based the simplification of my system on this and eliminated about 12' of permeated hose that ran all over my boat.

            My boat now has no Y-valve but it also has no means to directly flush overboard either.
            1999 Sandpiper Pilothouse - Current
            1989 3888 - 2011-2019, 1985 Contessa - 2005-2011, 1986 21' Trophy 1998-2005
            Nobody gets out alive.

            Comment


              #7
              SwampNut wrote:
              Your boat came without one? I thought they were all stock. I've never seen one without it.
              Nope. They were an option. I don't have one either.
              2003 Bayliner 305 - SOLD!
              Twin 5.7L, Carb'd, 445 hours
              Bravo II drives
              Closed-cooling

              Comment


                #8
                We don't have a macerator either.
                Jim McNeely
                New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
                Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
                Brighton, Michigan USA
                MMSI # 367393410

                Comment


                  #9
                  So, how do I keep the costal boys happy.
                  From the guides I've read, you need to mechanically make it impossible to open the valve. Remove the handle, zip tie it, etc.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    SwampNut wrote:
                    From the guides I've read, you need to mechanically make it impossible to open the valve. Remove the handle, zip tie it, etc.
                    The absence of a Y valve has been much discussed. Y valves are used in boats mostly of older design. The newer designs avoid them as the toilets flush directly into the holding tank without passing through a Y valve and without the possibility of discharging directly overboard. The newer holding tanks have two fittings that allow for evacuating the tank, one through a macerator (if so equipped), and the other through the deck fitting which connects to a pump out at the dock.

                    The regulations calling for a Y valve have not kept up with the new design in which a Y valve has been rendered obsolete. To satisfy the intent of the law in avoiding accidental discharge of the holding tank via the macerator builders have employed either a key lock switch on the macerator or two switches that need to be in the "on" position in order to evacuate the tank.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Love all the help! Mine has the two switches that have to pushed at the same time to activate the pump. So other than the angle of the exit hose, slant back towards the pump, or slant towards the exit on the side of the boat I have all the answers! You guys are great, Thanks!!!!

                      Dave Currie

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The absence of a Y valve has been much discussed. Y valves are used in boats mostly of older design. The newer designs avoid them as the toilets flush directly into the holding tank without passing through a Y valve and without the possibility of discharging directly overboard.
                        I was NOT talking about a Y valve. The macerator discharge should be under water. Therefore, it MUST have a proper brass seacock arrangement, and that is what you tie off to satisfy the regulations. I've never seen, in writing from the authorities, anything about an electrical cut-out. Everything I've read has talked about mechanical shut-off methods.

                        Slowstation, that does bring up a point; did you know you need a seacock for this, and do you know how to choose a proper one? I'm afraid I left out one step in my instructions, not really thinking about the seacock. You need to put a backer board for the seacock to press against, not just the hull.



                        http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey...ng-seacock.asp

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I am going thru the hull on the side, not the bottom. I am hoping that a "keyed" electrial switch will satisfy the Coasties, can't see why not. Again thanks everybody for your great help!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            So you're going to pump out into air? Sounds smelly. How far above the waterline? I think ABYC considers anything less than a foot to be insufficient.

                            I am hoping that a "keyed" electrial switch will satisfy the Coasties, can't see why not.
                            Find this in writing. The "why not" is because they follow regulations.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Slowtation wrote:
                              I am going thru the hull on the side, not the bottom. I am hoping that a "keyed" electrial switch will satisfy the Coasties, can't see why not. Again thanks everybody for your great help!
                              I think you will be fine. Many boats in the Pac NW are set up like the way you are proposing without incurring the wrath of the Coast Guard.

                              Comment

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