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    Repack trailer bearings?-gctid388427

    How often to you all repack your trailer bearings? I have the EZ-lube spindels with a zirk fitting, so a couple times a year I jack up the trailer and spin each wheel while I squeeze in new grease until all of the old grease is pumped out (if you don't spin it while you pump, you can blow out the rear seal). This seems to do a good job at repacking the bearings, but I'm just wondering if there would be a benefit to pulling the hubs every so often and repacking by hand. I know it's not that hard, but it's messy and time consuming.

    #2
    I pop them and at least check them every year.

    Just cause you pump grease in them doesn't kep them from wearing out or getting loose.

    It only takes a hour of so to do, Not sure how far you tow but here it can be anywhere from a hour to 5 hours one way depending on where I drag it.

    I also let them cool before I back it in the water (not that they get hot, but it is a good idea to stop every now and then and feel them to make sure they are cool)
    Boatless at this time

    A veteran is someone who, at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including their life."

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      #3
      once a year before the first freeze.

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        #4
        I repack mine every other year. Additionally, I have the ez-lube spindles and give each one a few pumps of grease a couple times per season. I probably would not repack mine so often, but the real reason I go in there is to check the brakes. Since I have everything opened up, I re-pack the bearings as a preventative measure.

        I also keep a close eye on the temperature of the hubs after towing. If the hubs are relatively cool, I assume everything is ok. If something is unusually hot, then I investigate.
        Mocoondo
        2002 Bayliner 195 Capri
        Mercruiser 5.0L V8 / Alpha I Gen II
        MMSI: 338091755

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          #5
          I pull both inner outer and repack every spring. Better to do in the fall just because if you have a bad seal you may have water freeze over winter and rust. I put on about 5500-6500 kilos on my trailer every year, it needs to be reliable and safe on the highways.

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            #6
            With the ez lubes you don't have to repack. Just pump it through like you have been doing and it's a repack. That's the whole idea! Ezlubes and bearing buddies are NOT the same thing, for those who are not aquainted with the system.

            What I would do is jack up the wheels one at a time and spin them. Are they nice and quiet and smooth? If so, carry on. If not, replace them. I tend to do a set of bearings every 1-2 years. The main issue is the inner axle seal surface. If it's good, the bearings last a decent length of time. If they are rough, the water leaks by the seal and the bearings go very quickly.

            I've been on the side of the road screwed enough times that I carry a full set of bearings and tools to change them roadside:

            1) Grease

            2) Garbage bag (For old grease)

            3) Lots of paper towel

            4) Small hammer and screwdriver (To tap off bearing caps/bearing buddies, and tapping off brake drums if necessary)

            5) Medium size crescent wrench

            6) Cotter pins

            7) Vice grips for pulling out old sotter pin

            8) Jack/jackstand of course

            9) Hand wash

            Re-re is down to about 30 min roadside!! Ha!

            Also, a spare tire is a really good idea (I never had one for the longest time...feel much better now).

            I'm a bit touchy when I trailer...my boat has been good to me...my trailer's name is 'impending disaster'.

            Chay

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              #7
              Not that you asked, but I would suggest you carry an extra complete hub. If you burn your bearings and races it's easier to just change out the hub on the side of the road than it is to remove and replace the old races.:arr

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                #8
                Yea, and the best part is that all the goodies are already packed and ready to go inside the spare hub. Changing the hub is easier than bearings in the dark, rain, mud ect

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                  #9
                  Wayne, I agree. Not only to have one ready to go, but in the event of damage to the original hub.

                  These systems make it easy by mounting hub/bearings/wheel/tire all in one.




                  Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                  2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                  Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                  Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                  Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

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                    #10
                    2850Bounty wrote:
                    Wayne, I agree. Not only to have one ready to go, but in the event of damage to the original hub.

                    These systems make it easy by mounting hub/bearings/wheel/tire all in one.



                    Where could I pick one of those up?

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                      #11
                      Nursecarmen wrote:
                      Where could I pick one of those up?
                      Any good full service trailer building supply company.

                      It's a great idea, isn't it?

                      http://"http://www.google.com/#hl=en...ch result.</b>
                      Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                      2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                      Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                      Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                      Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

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                        #12
                        E Z lube gif of how it works.

                        Attached files [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/692306=28411-lube_demo.gif[/img]

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                          #13
                          Yep, I've used that GIF before. That's a good one!

                          Also, notice the grease purge area and the rubber cover.

                          This cover is designed to flex, and will/should account for any contraction that occurs when the hub cools from being submerged.

                          .
                          Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                          2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                          Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                          Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                          Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

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                            #14
                            Alaskanmutt wrote:
                            I pop them and at least check them every year.

                            Just cause you pump grease in them doesn't kep them from wearing out or getting loose.

                            It only takes a hour of so to do, Not sure how far you tow but here it can be anywhere from a hour to 5 hours one way depending on where I drag it.

                            I also let them cool before I back it in the water (not that they get hot, but it is a good idea to stop every now and then and feel them to make sure they are cool)
                            To do my tandem, it takes at least 6 hours. Of course this means replacing several suspect bearings, pounding out races without a press and lubing up 8 disc brake pins. The easy lube system is great, two or three times a year is plenty - note what old grease comes out and it'll tell you if you have a seal problem or water has penetrated your system. If it's water broken down grease, it's time to tear that hub and bearings apart, inspect/replace parts as necessary. At each trailering stop, I check the temperature of the sidewall of the tires, the rim and the hub. Warm to the touch or even slightly hot on hot days is okay. I mostly make sure each is running the same temperature. Note the sunny side of the trailer will be running warmer than the shade. Excessive heat (from say sticking surge brakes) will burn the grease seal and melt the grease. This means the grease flows out and water flows in. Look for grease residue on the rim.

                            The most important lesson here is to watch the old grease - it will tell you what's inside the hub. It's probably overkill, but I use blue silicone caulk when putting the hub covers on. I also keep the trailer hubs/bearings above the water line as much as possible. In other words, when launching, I back the trailer so the rear tires are in maybe 3-4" deep, I unhook the nose, have the dock lines on the cleats and in the admirals hands. I quickly back to a depth just deep enough to hit the brakes and launch the boat. The hubs are only under 16" of water pressure for a couple seconds. When landing, it takes a little more time, but I have everything ready and keep the hubs/brakes high and dry as much as possible.
                            1999 Ciera 2655 5.7L BIII "Brenda Lou"
                            1996 Skeeter 1850DV 175 Mariner 9.9 Mariner. sold, sold, sold
                            1975 Lund 14' 25 HP Mercury. sold, sold, sold
                            2008 Dodge Ram 2500 4x4 6.7L Turbo diesel Quad Cab
                            Green Bay, WI on the Fox River
                            South Bay Marina

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