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Inverter on 2655 Cierra Questions-gctid386521

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    Inverter on 2655 Cierra Questions-gctid386521

    There's a lot of great information on here (trying searching for "Inverter" some time) but I just can't seem to get my head around what I need.

    I recently purchased a 1999 Bayliner 2655 Cierra Sunbridge and the family is really happy. What started as a journey for a walk-around fishing boat with my two young boys ended up with a family boat (wife and daughter got involved in the search!) but you all know how that goes. All in all, I couldn't be happier. Thankfully I'm a pretty quick learner, so backing her into the slip only took me two tries last weekend with canvas up and 10+ knots.

    One addition to the boat is a Keurig coffee maker. This particular unit draws about 1000w. On our first run out I discover the boat doesn't have an inverter (quick learner, like I said) so no go for tea for the admiral or hot cocoa for the kids until we're back on shore power.

    So, from what I've read, I'll need a 1000w-1500w inverter. Currently I've got the standard 1 & 2 battery install with the master switch (Off/1/2/Both). I understand the need to start on 1 or Both, and switch over to 2 when at anchor.

    Is this battery bank capable of pulling the 1000w for brewing a cup? Should I start the engine shortly there after?

    Would the inverter be wired directly to the 2 battery, or the master switch? Or elsewhere?

    I see that you should install close to the battery bank, but not in the engine compartment (its a gas Merc I/O). What's the Max range? Do folks run extension cords from the inverter to the appliance (s)?

    What brand of inverted? I've read Xantrex, but recently having customer support problems. Are the West Marine products ok? Any other brand?

    Anything else I should really add here while I'm risking electrocution?

    Finally, is this something I can do myself or should I Bust Out Another Thousand for the local shop? (ugh)

    Thanks in advance for all your help!

    Joe

    #2
    jkurlanski wrote:


    One addition to the boat is a Keurig coffee maker. This particular unit draws about 1000w. On our first run out I discover the boat doesn't have an inverter (quick learner, like I said) so no go for tea for the admiral or hot cocoa for the kids until we're back on shore power.

    So, from what I've read, I'll need a 1000w-1500w inverter. Currently I've got the standard 1 & 2 battery install with the master switch (Off/1/2/Both). I understand the need to start on 1 or Both, and switch over to 2 when at anchor.

    Is this battery bank capable of pulling the 1000w for brewing a cup? Should I start the engine shortly there after?

    Would the inverter be wired directly to the 2 battery, or the master switch? Or elsewhere?

    I see that you should install close to the battery bank, but not in the engine compartment (its a gas Merc I/O). What's the Max range? Do folks run extension cords from the inverter to the appliance (s)?

    What brand of inverted? I've read Xantrex, but recently having customer support problems. Are the West Marine products ok? Any other brand?

    Anything else I should really add here while I'm risking electrocution?

    Finally, is this something I can do myself or should I Bust Out Another Thousand for the local shop? (ugh)

    Thanks in advance for all your help!

    Joe
    Typically, we'll start on #1, warm engine and charge #1 while warming. It takes only several minutes to bring a cranking battery back up, unless you have starting issues.

    Then we'll switch over to #2 and charge while under way.

    This keeps #1 in "reserve".

    **********************************

    Joe, you'll first want to understand that making 120 vac from 12 vdc is rather expensive in terms of Amp Hours consumed.

    IOW, it is not a very efficient means of making 120 vac. However, when the bank is sized correctly and managed correctly, it works well.

    You'll want to consider the anticipated Inverter usage or demands in order to appropriately size your HLBB (house load battery bank).

    Do the math converting Watts used (plus time frame), figure in an efficiency deficit, and you'll see the 12 vdc Amp Hours required.

    Now you'll want to consider that these Amp Hours must be replaced sooner than later for good battery health.

    Using the stove top is much more efficient, IMO. But perhaps not as convenient!

    Inverter power:

    NO.... you will not feed this through the MBSS.

    Most Inverters will be directly connected to the HLBB, and will be fused right at the battery bank.

    If you go with a Xantrex Freedom Chrg/Inv unit, the same heavy leads that power the Inverter side, double as the HLBB charge leads.

    Powering outlets and/or S/P panel:

    With your size boat, the average/typical S/P and boat's AC electrical system is at 30 Amps... or roughly 3,600 Watt capable.

    In order to use an Inverter Auto-Transfer system (if even equipped), or a Rotary Selector switch (i.e., Shore Power/Gen/Inverter) the Inverter really needs to supply 3,600 Watts.

    That is a large Inverter!

    If using a lessor watt inverter, it becomes somewhat tricky to bring this into the boat's 3,600 watt capable AC panel.

    The risk would be over-burdening the Inverter if too many circuits were powered up at the same time. :thumb

    (the inverter would cut-out and protect itself......, I just don't think it's a good idea to do this)

    There are some slide-bar main breaker panels that help make this work, in that you can separate circuits out.
    • ALL circuits (3,600 watts potential) are powered via AC shore power.
    • XYZ circuits ONLY (1,500 watt potential) are powered via Inverted power.




    But this gets rather involved.

    Or..... you power several new circuits for inverter used only, keeping the smaller inverters out of the S/P panel loop.

    These would be circuits powered via Inverter only.

    Bottom line.... this is going to require some careful planning and designing.

    .
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

    Comment


      #3
      jkurlanski wrote:
      There's a lot of great information on here (trying searching for "Inverter" some time) but I just can't seem to get my head around what I need.

      I recently purchased a 1999 Bayliner 2655 Cierra Sunbridge and the family is really happy. What started as a journey for a walk-around fishing boat with my two young boys ended up with a family boat (wife and daughter got involved in the search!) but you all know how that goes. All in all, I couldn't be happier. Thankfully I'm a pretty quick learner, so backing her into the slip only took me two tries last weekend with canvas up and 10+ knots.

      One addition to the boat is a Keurig coffee maker. This particular unit draws about 1000w. On our first run out I discover the boat doesn't have an inverter (quick learner, like I said) so no go for tea for the admiral or hot cocoa for the kids until we're back on shore power.

      So, from what I've read, I'll need a 1000w-1500w inverter. Currently I've got the standard 1 & 2 battery install with the master switch (Off/1/2/Both). I understand the need to start on 1 or Both, and switch over to 2 when at anchor.

      I would suggest a 1500 minimum 2000 best.

      Don't start on both batteries

      Yes use 2 at anchor and switch it out to a 31 series battery.


      Is this battery bank capable of pulling the 1000w for brewing a cup? Should I start the engine shortly there after?

      Would the inverter be wired directly to the 2 battery, or the master switch? Or elsewhere?

      Wire the inverter directly to #2 battery with a 150 amp inline fuse. Remember for 1000watts you are drawing over 100 amps

      I see that you should install close to the battery bank, but not in the engine compartment (its a gas Merc I/O). What's the Max range? Do folks run extension cords from the inverter to the appliance (s)?

      I installed mine behind the aft bunk headress and put four vents in that area, yes do not install in the engine compartment.

      The inverter must be accessible to turn on and off (it draws power at idle.

      You can plug in to the inverter with an extension cord, connect the extension cord to your shore power plug or wire it to a dedicated plug or to the ac panel with a selector switch for selecting shore power or inverter. Remember an inverter will not have the capacity the shore power has.


      What brand of inverted? I've read Xantrex, but recently having customer support problems. Are the West Marine products ok? Any other brand?

      For coffee any brand will do

      Anything else I should really add here while I'm risking electrocution?

      Finally, is this something I can do myself or should I Bust Out Another Thousand for the local shop? (ugh)

      It is a DIY project but It does require some knowledge of basic wiring.

      Thanks in advance for all your help!

      Joe
      Hope this helps

      Comment


        #4
        There are other ways to make coffee on a boat...

        Old Fart out

        Comment


          #5
          The problem you will encounter has to do with battery capacity. To pull 1000 watts (for maybe 10 minutes?) from the usual battery bank found in a 26' boat will really take a wallop out of them. No matter what your battery rating might be, you should know that the ratings are not "linear". For example, a typical 6 volt "Golf Cart" battery has a rating of 220 amp-hours, but at a "20 hour rate". What this means is that this style of battery would put out about 10 amps for about 20 hours before it were totally dead. Try taking 220 amps from this battery and it will NOT last one hour!

          You would do better to get a Honda 2000 and save the inverter for charging cell phones or other low draw items that need 120 volts.

          Or you could buy a Kipor
          2007 Discovery 246
          300mpi BIII
          Welcome island Lake Superior

          Comment


            #6
            706jim wrote:
            The problem you will encounter has to do with battery capacity. To pull 1000 watts (for maybe 10 minutes?) from the usual battery bank found in a 26' boat will really take a wallop out of them. No matter what your battery rating might be, you should know that the ratings are not "linear". For example, a typical 6 volt "Golf Cart" battery has a rating of 220 amp-hours, but at a "20 hour rate". What this means is that this style of battery would put out about 10 amps for about 20 hours before it were totally dead. Try taking 220 amps from this battery and it will NOT last one hour!

            You would do better to get a Honda 2000 and save the inverter for charging cell phones or other low draw items that need 120 volts.

            Or you could buy a Kipor
            Is some instances such as when running an inverter is the only way to go. I would not run a portable generator or use the alcohol stove.

            A 31 battery will give a good thirty minutes of useable inverter time. Enough to make coffee, toast or cook a hotdog in the microwave.

            A deep cycle 31 will stand 80-100 amps for long enough especially when the engine is running.

            Comment


              #7


              Heres my 1750 watt inverter installed. Note the large (4/0) cables in the rear. They go to a 175 amp type T fuse located at the battery bank. You really need to know a bit about connecting LARGE cables properly to install an inverter.

              Comment


                #8
                Looking to put in a 1,500 watt inverter in my 2655....main use is a 600 watt Emerson MW8770WC microwave...

                First I thought it was an extra small microwave that only drew 600 watts, so was going to try it on my 600 watt continous load inverter portable battery box....But then realized that it is 600 cooking watts...that actually draws something like 850 watts from the battery....

                Will try my 1,000 watt inverter portable battery box...just to see what the microwave does....make sure that it likes the typical "Modified Sine Wave" Inverter, which all cheaper inverters are....

                But I think I should install a dedicated large inverter...I see Canadian Tire has a 1,500 watt on sale for $119....good price...I will just have to cough up some money for some big Cables to feed it....

                Don't forget to fuse the DC feed near the battery and then what do you do to ground the microwave?...is the inverter grounded internally back to the battery negative side....

                Comment


                  #9
                  We have a Xantex unit that puts out around 1800w steady and a bit more in surge mode. I think it cost around $300. It will run the microwave or the A/C but not both at once. the Microwave oven is one of the best uses for it - because the electricity is only required for a few mins thereby not pulling down the batteries. IMO it is not necessary to get a unit that will put out 30 amps. The panel is sized to be able to supply all electrical accessories at once. They are not normally ever all on at once. For instance one of the breakers is for the hot water heater - we rarely use this, & if we did we could heat the water up at the dock with shore power & it would stay warm all day with light usage. We also would not use the stove in summer when we might be using the ac (that stove heats up the cabin in a hurry!).

                  One thing to consider is the voltage drop you may incur in the input lines from the batteries. Our inverter shuts itself off when the voltage at the inverter gets down to 10.0V. That can happen fast with voltage drops in the wires and through the big fuze by the battery. Bottom line, you will not get to fully discharge the batteries.

                  It works real well when underway with the alternator providing energy (at a slightly higher voltage too) to keep the load on the batteries down. We used to use it when idling through no wake zones to run the AC (about a 50 amp load on the battery/alternator system with the compressor on) when the grandkids were small & wanted to watch TV up there.

                  We have its output run to a source selector switch to get the electricity into our breaker panel.

                  Finally one has to remember that once the house batteries are discharged, it will take a while to recharge them with the engine/alternator. My alternator only has about 25 amps of excess current available while we are underway. To get full current we have to be going about 3500 rpms. Therefor recharging that house battery would take about 4 hours at cruise speed (for us that is a tank of gas!). There are of course higher powered alternators ($$).

                  For the above reasons we got a Honda 2000 which will run the air conditioner for 15 hours on its 1 gallon gas tank. We still use the inverter when underway where we have constant recharging from the alternator going on.

                  Hope this helps & was not too long winded!

                  Don

                  Comment


                    #10
                    DON IS RIGHT. The system he has is the best way to go. I have both a 2000 watt inverter and a 1000 watt Honda generator. The 1000 is the EU version and was only 400 bucks on Craig's list private party. The 2000 is much better and will run most anything on a 2655 boat We use the microwave or the coffee pot or blender each separately when needed. Gary
                    GARCHAR
                    1988 2655
                    2009 Volvo Penta 5.7 300 hp DP F3s
                    Twice Past Commodore
                    Northwest Outboard Trailer Sailors, Eugene,OR

                    Comment

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