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    Question about DC electrical circuits-gctid385956

    I am trying to learn what I can about how the electronics on my boat works and how to repair them in needed.

    [I have a 2005 185] So I bought a book called the 12 Volt bible for boaters and a multi meter. I was trying to learn how to use the meter and a odd thing happened. I set put the meter to test DC Volts and tested the batter. It read 12.something. I wanted to test a circuit to I tried to test the accesory power socket. Here is the strange part. When I put my test leds in I didn't get a 12 volt reading like I did for the battery. Instead I got really high numbers.

    Why is this? I knbow the socket works and I know I had the polarity right. Am I wrong or Shouldn't all circuits on the boat show 12 volts. I understand that amps will flucuate depending on resitance but should voltage remain steady?

    thanks

    #2
    Without getting into a whole bunch of questions and guessing, first thing I'm going to ask is you mulitmeter a DMM (Digital Multi Meter)? If it is and it's an auto ranging type, my guess is that you actually didn't make contact with the lighter socket ans the meter was reporting "high numbers" but in mV. Until you get used to a DMM you may make that mistake a few times. When looking at the reading you have to also be sure to read the "range" in which the numbers are in... typically mV or V.

    If you have an analog meter then there must be a different cause and we can go into all sorts of questions to help you figure it out. The shortest answer I can give though is yes, most all your circuits on your boat should be in the 12V range, depending on battery charge/alternator charging, etc.

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      #3
      It is a DMM auto-ranging. I think you are right I am sure it was an error on my part.

      Can you tell me what the conversion is from MV to V?

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        #4
        1000 millivolts to a Volt

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