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    tight steering-gctid385532

    Hey guys, well i took my boat out today and the steering wheel was very hard to turn what could be causing this? Thanks

    #2
    I'll let the more experienced members walk you through the troubleshooting steps to diagnose it, but I'd bet a pretty big stack of dollars that your steering cable needs to be replaced. I'm going g through the same thing on my 1990 2651. Its not an expensive repair as far as bots go, but it is a pain in the ***.

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      #3
      Mac, disconnect the steering cables at the drives. Now turn the drives port/stbd.

      If the drives turn freely with the cables disconnected, then it's likely one of the helm units, and/or one of the cables or all!

      If they are still stiff to turn, then your problem is with the collar steering fork bushings.

      Your location suggests salt water. When the transom shield ears for these bushings become wet, the space between the bushings and the aluminum ears will corrode. The corrosion expands as small crystals develop, and will eventually cause the bushings to compress against the collar steering fork shafts. This will cause very stiff steering.

      The transmissions ONLY will need to be removed.

      Watch for the shims.... keep the shims separated from Port/Stbd.

      Make sure that the same transmission goes back onto the same Intermedaite housing.

      Stake or somehow mark the spindle arm and fork shaft for re-alignment when going back together.

      (the spindle arm controls Stop-to-Stop steering... not the fork! One spine off, and the drive angle will be limited)

      Now remove the pinch bolt for the spindle arm.

      You may need to drive a small steel wedge into the pinch slot to expand the "pinch"!

      Now you'll drive wooden wedges in between the top of the fork and the transom shield, forcing the collar steering down and out.

      The bushings are very easy to replace once the fork is out of the transom shield.

      Replace the two V-ring seals while at it.

      Purge the grease ports of old dreid up grease while the forks are removed.

      When finished, she'll steer like new again!

      .

      .
      Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
      2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
      Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
      Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
      Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

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        #4
        Had the exact same problem on mine when I bought the boat. CSR marine had to replace the fork because it broke when they tried to pull it out. New part was over $500 FYI. Pulled out the fork last week to check on it and replace the seal. Seal must go up tight against transom shield when fork is at rest.

        Gary

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          #5
          I'd only recommend the follwing with the engine out. On my 'new to me' sadly neglected boat, I had both drives extrememly stiff. It was the bushing areas corroded on both of them. I got the forks loose, but the shafts would NOT budge!

          With the steering fork loose, I still had to use a tonne of heat to get the shaft out. It destroyed the bushings...when they start to melt the shaft slips out easily...the good news was you can still get the bushings so I just replaced them (As long as they are the larger shaft size...On mine I have two different units and one was small so I had to custom turn a new bushing, so check this out with the parts guy before torching the old ones!). It actually makes more sense to do it this way than risk killing you shaft, although really I was more woried about the transom fitting collars breaking. One shaft was ok, but the other needed to be replaced anyway-it was way too pitted. the nice part was the extremely minimal force required for removal. Keep on mind though, mine must have been like the worst case scenario.

          DO NOT hammer directly on the top of the shaft, no matter how tempting this is. The shaft is soft and will mushroom, then you have to cut it out somehow.

          I really like the wedge idea, just be carefull with the amount of force you apply. Wedges are extemely powerfull!

          Anyway, if you use this, be sure to have wet rags stuffed in on the plywood of the transom so it doensn't ignite. The proximity is very close.

          The 'seal' on the shaft is called a 'v-seal' and is really more of a splash guard than a seal, which is why this corrosion happens in the first place...

          Chay

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            #6
            Mac, here's somewhat of a break down on the components that may be causing your tight steering.

            The collar steering fork is SEQ # 2.

            The V-ring seal is SEQ #4.

            The spindle arm and pinch bolt are SEQ #'s 47 & 48.

            The two plastic bushings are SEQ #'s 11 & 12.



            The PDS is SEQ #65, and is supported by two bearings.

            In your complete projects thread, I think that I mentioned the importance of replacing these bearings.

            For SEQ #'s to OEM p/n's, see this.

            .
            Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
            2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
            Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
            Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
            Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

            Comment


              #7
              Mac, I had the same problem on my 2850. Before you start tearing everything apart, disconect the stering cable from the linkage on the transom. try stering and try moving the outdrive. if the outdrive moves and the stearing doesn't start with the grease fitting on the bracket just aft of the motor. The cable connects to a rod that goes thru this bracket. depending on how often and what grease was used it will lock your steering up tight. if it is that and you keep trying to turn, you will mess up the cable. I was ready to buy a whole new system then realized all it was, was some old grease. Good luck

              Jim

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                #8
                Thanks guys i will try all this out as soon as this storm passes

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                  #9
                  Hi again Guys I have found the issues with my steering, Now am at the point of trying to remove the steering fork(Yoke) but with no luck the damn thing wont come out, I've tryed tons of heat andcans of PB blast. Are there any more ideas?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    mac0ne01 wrote:
                    Now am at the point of trying to remove the steering fork (Yoke) but with no luck the damn thing wont come out, I've tryed tons of heat andcans of PB blast. Are there any more ideas?
                    I thought that the thread I linked you to mentioned this, but apparently not.

                    Cut yourself two wooden wedges.

                    Gently drive the wedges in between the collar steering fork and the transom shield.

                    With the spindle arm pinch bolt loosened, the wedges should pull the fork down and out.

                    Don't forget that the indexing between the fork and the spindle arm control lock-to-lock steering stops.

                    One spline off will make quite a bit of difference, and you will not like it.

                    Attached files http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]
                    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                    Comment


                      #11
                      thanks for the great pic 2850Bounty that helps a lot. I will try this in the morning. Sorry did not get the link thanks again

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