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Pulling Engine - Hoist?-gctid385098

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    Pulling Engine - Hoist?-gctid385098

    So unless I get a firm date from the mechanic today, it looks like I have an engine to pull next weekend.

    My 2003 285 will be up on sticks in the yard. I'm guessing the top of the engine will be about 4' above the ground, and the bottom of the arch will be about 14'. The transom is probably another 3' above the top of the engine, and so I'd have to clear that.

    Looking at the usual auto supply outlets, I'm not seeing an engine hoist that can go from 4' to 14'. The specs are all in inches, between 70" and 88".

    I guess I don't need to pull it all the way up to the arch and out. I really just need to get it far enough up to remove the oil pan. But the higher the better, as I'd like to be able to do some other jobs while it's up. Totally out of the way would be ideal.

    Ideas?

    #2
    Give a phone call to a local sign contractor, or a company that uses a boom truck of sorts. Should be someone near you that has one.

    See if they'd shoot you a price for one pull, and one re-install. Shouldn't take more than 15 minutes each way, plus perhaps travel time.

    This would be so much easier and safer than messing around with an automotive type engine hoist, IMO.

    With the automotive hoist, you still need to figure out a way to either move the hull out from under the hoist, or move the hoist with an engine hanging from it.

    You mentioned that the boat will be on sticks, so moving the hull is not an option.... yes/no?

    Don't forget Mike C's recent issue with his boat being cribbed incorrectly. If you did not see his thread, the yard broke his hull via impropper cribbing/blocking underneath the forward keel.

    Insist upon the use of correct Marine Cribbing or Boat Stands!

    .
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

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      #3
      CaptTom wrote:
      So unless I get a firm date from the mechanic today, it looks like I have an engine to pull next weekend.

      My 2003 285 will be up on sticks in the yard. I'm guessing the top of the engine will be about 4' above the ground, and the bottom of the arch will be about 14'. The transom is probably another 3' above the top of the engine, and so I'd have to clear that.

      Looking at the usual auto supply outlets, I'm not seeing an engine hoist that can go from 4' to 14'. The specs are all in inches, between 70" and 88".

      I guess I don't need to pull it all the way up to the arch and out. I really just need to get it far enough up to remove the oil pan. But the higher the better, as I'd like to be able to do some other jobs while it's up. Totally out of the way would be ideal.

      Ideas?
      I pulled mine with a back hoe, just took the bucket off.

      It was a 2859 up on blocks.

      They can lift pretty high and then turned and put it on my trailer to take home.

      Comment


        #4
        There ya go! A back hoe will work also. That may be more expensive due to unloading/loading time to/ from the trailer, but certainly worth asking.

        Does the yard have a fork lift at their disposal?

        .
        Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
        2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
        Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
        Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
        Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

        Comment


          #5
          2850Bounty wrote:
          There ya go! A back hoe will work also. That may be more expensive due to unloading/loading time to/ from the trailer, but certainly worth asking.

          Does the yard have a fork lift at their disposal?

          .
          Rick,

          Where I live every other farmer has one. Never thought about having to truck one to the site.

          Out and in cost me a 24

          Comment


            #6
            Some of the larger tow trucks have to booms on them. It probably wouldnt cost too much to get one out there. You could also rent a fork lift for half a day. Either one of those options are going to be a couple hundred dollars. There may be a business close by that has a fork lift some one might do it for a case of beer.
            1989 Avanti 3450 Sunbridge
            twin 454's
            MV Mar-Y-Sol
            1979 Bayliner Conquest 3150 hardtop ocean express.
            Twin chevy 350's inboard
            Ben- Jamin
            spokane Washington

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              #7
              Just got a call from the mechanic, they can get me in next week and have the job done before I could even start it next weekend.

              But now that you mention it, the yard has a loader that might work if the mechanic can't meet the schedule he committed to.

              Thanks guys!

              Comment


                #8
                If you rent the right boom truck, it's a great way to remove a boat engine. You can be very precise because besides going up and down, the boom will telescope and rotate right or left, all without moving the truck. You can make and remake very minor adjustments while you're lifting or replacing the engine and you can slowly set the removed engine on a dime. It's tough to get a gantry lift exactly over the engine compartment so that there is no swing once the engine breaks free, but a boom truck allows you to compensate an inch at a time and even remove the engine without touching the sides of the engine compartment. At most tool rental yards, you can rent the truck, drive it home and operate it yourself, usually with a four hour minimum charge.

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