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Question for auto mechanic - Tow vehicle tranny-gctid345602

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  • boatworkfl
    replied
    Sounds just like the tranny in my 1995 F150, made the same noise and action exactly, they can be rebuilt, but I could have bought a rebuilt 4r70w tranny for $1000.00 (in 2005) but I just returned from the Arctic and could afford a good one, I opted for a genuine Ford tranny for $1800.00, it had a 3 year warranty, I was tole by a ford dealer in ND that the new warranty is much longer, better than 6 months to a year for others. Ford comes with the converter, you never know what is in the fluid that is in the old converter. If you can get a transmission jack you can do-it-yourself, I do recommend flushing the lines and radiater cooler as recomended by Ford if you do it your self. Go with the Ford reconditioned tranny. Towing in overdrive was an issue.

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  • Guest
    replied
    There are three things that will kill an automatic transmission. Abuse, lack of maintenence, and over heat. This vehicle is pretty light for towing much of anything, so---. Is your gross towing weight within the manufacturer's specifications? Have the scheduled transmission oil changes been done as per the maintenance guide? Do you have an auxiliary transmission oil cooler?

    If this transmission is from the AOD/4R70W family, they are not a bad transmission, but not particularly strong. 170,000 miles is getting up there, but with proper care an automatic will last a lot longer than that. The whining noise would make me suspect the main hydraulic pump, not the torque converter. Whatever it is, assuming that you want to keep the vehicle and continue to tow with it, my advice would be to ask around to find the most reputable automatic transmission shop that you can find. This probably won't be a dealer or a "budget" transmission shop. Have them do the initial troubleshooting and diagnosis. Depending on what they find, and given the mileage on it, you will probably need a complete rebuild or replacement, including the torque converter, if there is severe wear or if a lot of shrapnel has gone through the system. It probably won't be cheap either.

    Sorry to sound so pessimistic, but that's just the way it is.

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  • Chief_Alen
    replied
    I wonder if you have any gear oil in the diff.

    Gears could have went.

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  • itsabowtime2
    replied
    Go with a company that offers a warranty on the re-build.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    just get it rebuilt ,they are cheap to rebuid it went a fair distance//

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Good use of them

    For the OP, that trans should be available mail order for something in the neighborhood of $1500 reman + a couple of hundred for the TC. Install is pretty straightforward if you're handy with a wrench.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    replied
    The torque converter is inside the bellhousing that is bolted to the transmission. It shares the same fluid as the transmission, so problems in one will cause problems in the other.

    Transmissions really can't be diagnosed until they are off and taken apart, which is not free, and your truck will be stuck at that shop.

    There are companies that build heavy duty transmissions for towing/racing and are mail order. They probably cost about the same as what you would pay for a rebuild at Chang's AAA Transmission shop.

    Go to the ford truck enthusiasts forum and you will find a wealth of info about your expo.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Pau Hana,

    I've used Aamco for years . . .to get the absolute worst case scenario diagnosis for $0.00

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    No transmission has an expiration engineered into it- the care and feeding over the 170k miles are the determining factor for longevity. Sounds like the dealer's tech came up with a bunch of BS and took the easy way out- swapping parts. Secondly, when repairing the trans, whether a bench unit reman, brand new unit, or repairing your current trans, the TC must be replaced- if nothing else, to ensure that contaminated fluid is not recirculated into the new trans.

    As for your specific problem- it sounds like it may indeed be the TC, as you have no engagement either forward or reverse. At this point, I recommend you do both if you're going to keep the truck. To me, the 4.6 is a bit low end for towing, so that's another thing to consider.

    Personally, I avoid AAmco.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    nh boater wrote:
    the torque converter is part of the tranny.

    Ok so it needs a tranny. Now there is one more way you could go with the tranny. You can buy a used one with a life time warranty parts and labor. Should be around 1500 to 1800 bucks to do this.

    I do this all the time for my customers and it saves them alot of money plus the warranty if better than a new one or reman. Food for thought
    where??

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    boatommy wrote:
    do a google search. Torque converter is between the tranny and engine and is usually replaced/refurbed when doing a rebuild.
    where??

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    nh boater wrote:
    The Torque converter is part of the tranny.

    Ok so it needs a tranny. Now there is one more way you could go with the tranny. You can buy a used one with a life time warranty parts and labor. should be around 1500 to 1800 bucks to do this.

    I do this all the time for my customers and it saves them alot of money plus the warranty if better than a new one or reman. food for thought
    So simply replacing the torque converter won't resolve the problem? Replacing the tc and tranny is needed/recommended?

    Just want to make sure I'm headed along the right path.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    boatommy wrote:
    Do a google search. torque converter is between the tranny and engine and is usually replaced/refurbed when doing a rebuild.
    Yup, yup I knew what the torque converter is. I was wondering if replacing only the torque converter would solve my problem. Also commenting on the dealer's statement that it is "in" the tranny, verses attached to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    The Torque converter is part of the tranny.

    Ok so it needs a tranny. Now there is one more way you could go with the tranny. You can buy a used one with a life time warranty parts and labor. should be around 1500 to 1800 bucks to do this.

    I do this all the time for my customers and it saves them alot of money plus the warranty if better than a new one or reman. food for thought

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Do a google search. torque converter is between the tranny and engine and is usually replaced/refurbed when doing a rebuild.

    Leave a comment:

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