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Removing seawater pump pulley ?-gctid380863

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    Removing seawater pump pulley ?-gctid380863

    I will be servicing or replacing my seawater pump on my 2007 350 mpi, but need advice on removing the pulley. My manual say to "press the pulley off the shaft" and later to "press" it back on. What do they mean, does this require a special tool or skill. There is no bolt holding it on.

    Thanks!

    #2
    nightwings wrote:
    I will be servicing or replacing my seawater pump on my 2007 350 mpi, but need advice on removing the pulley. My manual say to "press the pulley off the shaft" and later to "press" it back on. What do they mean, does this require a special tool or skill. There is no bolt holding it on.

    Thanks!
    Nightwings: Our last boat, a 2005 285 that we bought new, had that 350MPI motor. In 3 years, we replaced 3 seawater impellers. Unceremonisly towed-in each time. Probably all my fault, due to running aground in the sandy bottom here in Florida. Sand into the water pick-up! The curse with that motor is the "cool fuel" filter and pump assembly that is a bit in the way of seawater pump removal. Not to mention the risky and expensive cool fuel filter replacement job. The marine techs changed those seawater impellers for me due to the cool fuel setup and tight quarters. The impeller job is easy, once the darn thing is off the motor. When we got our 07 325, I was so happy to see base engines with super easy access to both seawater pumps. And the base engines have a simple canister spin-off fuel filter/water separator, sensible non-inverted oil filters, and no more dealing with the "cool fuel" setup. Now you have heard the bad points of MPI maintenance, but I wish you the best with that seawater pump. Oh, one more thing, the MPI comes with the expensive BRASS seawater pump. If the housing is shot, hold onto your wallet! Griff

    Comment


      #3
      ..usually pressing on or off a pulley is to literally pull it off or press it on with a hydraulic press. Any garage or shop can do it, or you can get creative with a floor jack I suppose! But hard to believe you'd have to mess with the pulley to get to the impeller, I know on the BravoIII pump it disassembles from opposite side of pulley....

      Comment


        #4
        This is why I like the Johnsom pump F6B9 crank mounted pump, pull 4 screws then the impeller, replace impeller with the provided lube, replace cap and gasket-15 min.
        Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

        Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
        Twin 350 GM power
        Located in Seward, AK
        Retired marine surveyor

        Comment


          #5
          MikeMag wrote:
          ..usually pressing on or off a pulley is to literally pull it off or press it on with a hydraulic press. Any garage or shop can do it, or you can get creative with a floor jack I suppose! But hard to believe you'd have to mess with the pulley to get to the impeller, I know on the BravoIII pump it disassembles from opposite side of pulley....
          Yeah Mike, there is no need to remove the pulley to change an impeller. The only trouble is tight quarters and that pesky cool fuel setup. Griff

          Comment


            #6
            Sorry for this lengthy post, but it's a step-by-step procedure that I documented when I changed the impeller on my '05 350 MAG MPI. Your setup should be the same or very similar.

            *

            Seawater pump impeller/O-ring kit Merc Part# 47-862232A $35

            *

            A> REMOVING THE PUMP

            (1) Loosen jamnut (5/8") on tensioner pulley, release tension on serpentine belt by turning adjustment stud (5/16"), and remove belt.

            (2) Remove idler pulley directly above seawater pump by removing the thru-bolt (use 5/8" wrench to hold bolt head behind pulley and a 5/8" socket for nut on pulley face). This frees a small bracket at the top of the pump brace from the alternator bracket.

            (3) Loosen clamp and disconnect the hose that connects to the bottom of the "Y" pipe next to the seawater pump pulley.

            (4) The red 1.25" I.D. seawater intake hose has a quick-disconnect fitting midway between transom connector and pump, located below cyl #6. Pry up the retainer clip with a flat-bladed screwdriver and separate the connection. (If your setup does not have this Q-D fitting, then loosen clamp on the upper hose at the pump housing and disconnect hose from pump. If necessary, the fuel-water separator filter can be removed for better access).

            (5) Loosen clamp and remove lower hose from pump.

            (6) Using a deep 5/8" socket, remove nut from mounting stud at top of pump brace. This will release the small bracket mentioned in step (2) above. Remove the 5/8" bolt directly below the stud - the pump is now free. Carefully walk the pump out and off the mounting stud. If there is still a section of the red intake hose attached, loosen clamp and remove hose from top pump port.

            *

            B> CHANGING THE IMPELLER

            (1) Using a 10mm socket, remove the 3 bolts that hold the brace to the pump (2 on the pump housing and 1 on top of the shaft behind the pulley)and separate the brace from the pump.

            (2) Remove the remaining 4 bolts with the 10mm socket, and the backplate separates from the housing.

            (3) Remove and discard the O-ring

            (4) Using 2 flat-bladed screwdrivers on opposite sides, carefully pry the old impeller up and out of the pump housing.

            (5) Thoroughly wipe clean all surfaces, including the recess for the O-ring, and inspect front housing wall and backplate for excessive wear or scoring. If okay, smear some petroleum jelly onto the housing front wall.

            (6) Take a 1/4" wide plastic ziptie and wrap it around the middle of the new impeller, getting it as tight as possible, while folding the impeller vanes down. Using a squirt of dish detergent and some water, coat the impeller to get it nice and slippery.

            (7) With the pump housing standing upright on the pulley, firmly twist the impeller counter-clockwise while pushing it down into the housing, at the same time ensuring that the impeller vanes are squeezed into the housing. As the impeller lines up with the flats on the shaft, it will slide down into the housing, and the ziptie will ride up and off. Make sure the impeller is seated all the way down into the housing.

            (8) Dab some petroleum jelly into the recess for the O-ring and press the O-ring into place. Dab PJ on backplate where it contacts impeller.

            (9) Position the backplate on top of the housing and start the 4 bolts fingertight to ensure proper alignment. Position the brace and start its 3 bolts. Tighten down all 7 bolts with the 10mm socket.

            (10) Re-attach the red inlet hose to the upper pump port and clamp securely. Pump is now ready to be re-installed, following section A in reverse order.
            Ted
            2005 288 Command Bridge
            350 Mag MPI / BRAVO III

            Every Day Is Saturday

            Comment


              #7
              boatworkfl wrote:
              This is why I like the Johnsom pump F6B9 crank mounted pump, pull 4 screws then the impeller, replace impeller with the provided lube, replace cap and gasket-15 min.
              I think that Doug C. considered converting to this pump after finding that a Merc replacement was weeks out.

              Not sure what he ended up doing.

              But I certainly agree..... if you have the space for this pump, it sure makes life easier.

              .
              Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
              2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
              Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
              Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
              Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

              Comment


                #8
                2850Bounty wrote:
                I think that Doug C. considered converting to this pump after finding that a Merc replacement was weeks out.

                Not sure what he ended up doing.

                But I certainly agree..... if you have the space for this pump, it sure makes life easier.

                .
                When using the F6B9 pump be sure to slip a new belt in place so the hose does not need to be removed.
                Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                Twin 350 GM power
                Located in Seward, AK
                Retired marine surveyor

                Comment


                  #9
                  I finally found a gringo (I am in Mexico on the Sea of Cortez) mechanic familiar with this job and had the tools to do it. I do need to replace the shaft assembly and seals, at least, and will replace the impeller and serpentine belt as well (preventative). We will then do a sea trial to check the pressures in the coolant system since corrosion build-up can cause a lot of related issues and I have 830 hours , mostly in sea water on the 2007 engine. Then do a chemical flush of the heat exchanger system if necessary (probably).

                  Yes, I agree the cool fuel module is really in the way and I have tried to remove the pump last time I had the impeller replaced. Mucho BOAT Bucks for this job.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    2850Bounty wrote:
                    I think that Doug C. considered converting to this pump after finding that a Merc replacement was weeks out.Not sure what he ended up doing.But I certainly agree..... if you have the space for this pump, it sure makes life easier..
                    Correct...The Cool Fuel Gen II is in the way. The raw water pump comes off by feeling for the two bolts at the back of the very expensive brass pump (if it has the air purge system). MSRP is $658 for the pump plus another 35 for the impeller. Merc has found that the pump lasts about 250-300 hours before the brass wears down to the point where a new impeller will NOT help. I am in this position right now and converting my 6.2 to the Johnson pump as described by BoatworkFL. The Johnson is 1/3 the cost and mounted directly on the crank shaft. Has four bolts easily accessible at the front of the engine and the impeller is also 1/3 the price of the Merc impeller. I just received my bracket special made in Louisiana. The Johnson pumps are made in Sweden and last two to three times longer than the Merc ones. When I am done changing over, I will post a completed project on the design. Basically the merc raw water pump comes off, I replace the serpentine belt with an Alpha belt and I am done after extended hose plumbing to the new pump on the front of the engine...BAD NEWS: the merc raw waterpump I was going to order four weeks ago was back ordered to 1 May and is now backordered from the factory to mid June. There are no third party manufactures. If anyone says they have one in inventory, they are fibbing...My OEM raw water pump had about 350 hours on it and it looks worn out inside... I will post photos as part of my completed projects...

                    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]

                    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]

                    http://baylinerownersclub.org/media/....jpg[/img]
                    Doug ;}
                    MMSI: 338068776
                    "Go Aweigh to" Photos < click on red letters... 2001 Bayliner 2452 w/6.2 HO (paid for)


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