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I(39)m going to find out anyway! Typical scope creep-gctid377096

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    FishingFool wrote:
    Jim,

    I can tell you have the mitts.. I just had to have my fresh water pump rebuilt. As a result I spray painted the engines and the pulleys/parts that are in your oven with Chrysler blue.. They look great and it wasn't a terrible job to do except for Starboard side down in the little crawl space. Even with the respirator and eye protection it still sucked. My eyes watered uncontrollably, I might use swimming goggles next time.. Anyway mine look great but not nearly as good as that fresh powder coat!

    As far as the alternators go I just replaced both of mine as-well (and for the first time I am showing 13 to 14 AMPS)! The old Motorollas were done, the ball bearings fell out once I removed Port side! I had to weld an extender to the mounting bracket in order to make them fit correctly which also means I had to replace both belts with slightly longer ones.

    This difference is amazing and I think I will replace the Westerbeeke's ALT as a result.

    PS, to the other posters, The oven in the picture sure looks like the princess oven on my 38 ( I am a live aboard and use it daily) .. My money says the parts were baked in the Princess.

    Thanks for the post and the powder coat info!
    Nope, not a Princess... Although there is one on the boat. This is a fridgedair... I didn't even bother to clean it, left the PO food stains in the bottom. I didn't think that would be a problem, but when I baked the oil out of the parts at 500 degrees, the "grunge" certainly did smoke a lot! Extra protection for the metal! The prep was a lot of work, the powder and oven bake were easy... Also need to use a IR gun, the powder "flows" at 375 degrees for 20 minutes. Note, this is after the part is at temp... important. Baking in too short of a time can cause improper coating... and I understand getting off powder coat can be a challenge.

    I'll post a pic of them installed, and again after I do the valve covers, intake manifold and other parts.... right now, those parts look horrible, even more so with these in there!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    As far as rattle cans in the engine bay, I can see your point. I'll be "high" off that on Saturday. I need to spray the block, after of course, a good cleaning. Don't captain the boat after inhaling that stuff! Not looking forward to the headache either. Respirator is in the tool bag.

    The oven, is a Craigslist find at $25. And I built a wood stand, is raised in the air about 3' up. Also on wheels from Harbor Freight so it is moveable. Seems I'm almost geared up for production! I am willing to coat small items for folks who want that, drop me a line.

    Power coat, except for the dedicated oven (which is a must), is way more environmentally friendly than rattle cans. I sprayed the powder outdoors, with a mask, but doubt it is really necessary. I have a table stand that holds the oven rack while the parts are dangling. Multiple angle access. A soda blaster, which I also have, can be convenient, provided there is not too much rust on the parts. The vinegar water did most of the work in this area.

    Leave a comment:


  • boatworkfl
    replied
    ishiboo wrote:
    He probably picked up an oven just for powder coating. You can usually find some ratty ones on Craigslist for $25-50.
    I will have to look into that, Harbor freight has a good deal on a powder coat set up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    penguin wrote:
    Well, after reaching out on several powder coat sites, I got the consensus, that powder coating the entire pulley (except the center of the alternator pulley) would not be a problem, including the area the belt tracks in. One of the powder coaters even mentioned that he coats pulleys on engines that are blue printed and hit RPMs in the 7000 range, or close to it anyway, without any problem. So, like most of the things I do, I am second guessing the decision! Hence the title, I'll find out anyway. One thing I will say, the results (this is my first powder coat job ever), are incredible, to the point the rest of the engine now looks like... you know what. The color is mirror blue, and gives me a great deal of pride, at least until the engine hatch is closed! The pulleys shine, just like in this picture, ready to use once cool, right out of the oven.

    I got a new alternator from the suggestions of other posters here, and have a new distributor to put in as well. Out with the rattle cans and more powder coating to follow!

    Note, these pulleys were in very poor paint peel rust condition. They were soaked in vinegar / water mix at 4 parts water to 1 part vinegar. Really cleaned off the rust. Hit with drill / wire wheel in between soakings. Stick into oven at 500 degrees to burn off any oil on metal surface. Baking power and water to "garage etch", super cleaning before coating... Pre heat parts to 120 degrees for better powder adhesion.

    Now regarding the scope creep. The project started out with a port engine that would stall when idling, about 70% of the time, at most unfortunate / embarrassing times.... docking. This problem has been tracked down to a old worn fuel pump, that had low strength at idle, starving the carb. A new fuel pump, fuel line, alternator, powder coat job, distributor and plug wires later, I'll be putting this back together this week end. Just in time for a short cruise!

    Anybody else suffer from scope creep lately?
    Jim,

    I can tell you have the mitts.. I just had to have my fresh water pump rebuilt. As a result I spray painted the engines and the pulleys/parts that are in your oven with Chrysler blue.. They look great and it wasn't a terrible job to do except for Starboard side down in the little crawl space. Even with the respirator and eye protection it still sucked. My eyes watered uncontrollably, I might use swimming goggles next time.. Anyway mine look great but not nearly as good as that fresh powder coat!

    As far as the alternators go I just replaced both of mine as-well (and for the first time I am showing 13 to 14 AMPS)! The old Motorollas were done, the ball bearings fell out once I removed Port side! I had to weld an extender to the mounting bracket in order to make them fit correctly which also means I had to replace both belts with slightly longer ones.

    This difference is amazing and I think I will replace the Westerbeeke's ALT as a result.

    PS, to the other posters, The oven in the picture sure looks like the princess oven on my 38 ( I am a live aboard and use it daily) .. My money says the parts were baked in the Princess.

    Thanks for the post and the powder coat info!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    boatworkfl wrote:
    I had a friend that tried making something illegal in his oven, first and last try, He could not run his oven up past 320 deg or so before the fumes drove him and me out.

    Be carefull what you bake in the oven, and yes the oven was replaced, and damaged so no one could use it.

    I would be interested in your project if your oven is still useable without noxious fumes.

    Powdered coating sounds like it would be more effecient in protecting metal parts on a boat than the thin paint they come with, I wonder about water cooled manifolds.

    I cannot believe you powdered the grate in the oven, I bet your wife had something to say about it!
    He probably picked up an oven just for powder coating. You can usually find some ratty ones on Craigslist for $25-50.

    Leave a comment:


  • boatworkfl
    replied
    I had a friend that tried making something illegal in his oven, first and last try, He could not run his oven up past 320 deg or so before the fumes drove him and me out.

    Be carefull what you bake in the oven, and yes the oven was replaced, and damaged so no one could use it.

    I would be interested in your project if your oven is still useable without noxious fumes.

    Powdered coating sounds like it would be more effecient in protecting metal parts on a boat than the thin paint they come with, I wonder about water cooled manifolds.

    I cannot believe you powdered the grate in the oven, I bet your wife had something to say about it!

    Leave a comment:


  • SomeSailor
    replied
    You're gonna be suffering more than that if the wife catches you curing paint in her oven.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    The parts look great!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest started a topic I(39)m going to find out anyway! Typical scope creep-gctid377096

    I(39)m going to find out anyway! Typical scope creep-gctid377096

    Well, after reaching out on several powder coat sites, I got the consensus, that powder coating the entire pulley (except the center of the alternator pulley) would not be a problem, including the area the belt tracks in. One of the powder coaters even mentioned that he coats pulleys on engines that are blue printed and hit RPMs in the 7000 range, or close to it anyway, without any problem. So, like most of the things I do, I am second guessing the decision! Hence the title, I'll find out anyway. One thing I will say, the results (this is my first powder coat job ever), are incredible, to the point the rest of the engine now looks like... you know what. The color is mirror blue, and gives me a great deal of pride, at least until the engine hatch is closed! The pulleys shine, just like in this picture, ready to use once cool, right out of the oven.

    I got a new alternator from the suggestions of other posters here, and have a new distributor to put in as well. Out with the rattle cans and more powder coating to follow!

    Note, these pulleys were in very poor paint peel rust condition. They were soaked in vinegar / water mix at 4 parts water to 1 part vinegar. Really cleaned off the rust. Hit with drill / wire wheel in between soakings. Stick into oven at 500 degrees to burn off any oil on metal surface. Baking power and water to "garage etch", super cleaning before coating... Pre heat parts to 120 degrees for better powder adhesion.

    Now regarding the scope creep. The project started out with a port engine that would stall when idling, about 70% of the time, at most unfortunate / embarrassing times.... docking. This problem has been tracked down to a old worn fuel pump, that had low strength at idle, starving the carb. A new fuel pump, fuel line, alternator, powder coat job, distributor and plug wires later, I'll be putting this back together this week end. Just in time for a short cruise!

    Anybody else suffer from scope creep lately?

    Attached files [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/680544=27151-Pulleys.jpg[/img]
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