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Installing FLoat Switch for Bilge-gctid373867

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  • 2850Bounty
    replied
    I just read the article and read the last section on battery power.

    I have to disagree with his recommendation for a direct battery connection. But we've already covered that in this thread.

    He goes on to mention not fusing this circuit, and mentions that there's no history of bilge pump wiring causing fires, etc. That may be true... I don't actually know what the stats on that are.

    But he then goes on to suggest the 3-way switch mounted at/near the helm. This would be the Manual/OFF/Auto switch, and he suggests powering so that power cannot be interrupted.

    Of course we all know NOT to use the Manual/OFF/Auto helm switches... right?

    But let's say that we did. Is this not increasing circuit distance for a circuit that he just said did not require circuit protection???

    I know.... that sounds rather harsh on my part here... but dang it, some of that just doesn't sound like good advice to me.

    There is absolutely no reason what-so-ever for any float switch wiring to originate from the helm.... period!

    This circuit can be short and within the confines of the engine bay... or if a midship pump, the distance would increase some, but no need to originate from the helm.

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    rc42a wrote:
    I've posted this link in another thread some time ago but it was the single most useful site that I found when planning my own bilge pump setup.

    Highly recommended reading:

    http://www.yachtsurvey.com/bilge_pumps.htm
    Just read it. I thought it was an excellent article.

    I hate reading articles like this because it creates more work! I now feel compelled to go back and redo my entire bilge pump system...

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Mine runs directly from the battery; I'm in the process of installing both a pos and neg buss to clean things up. The PO had wires run all over the eingine compartment including ground wires run with red wire.

    I also installed a small solar charger to keep the battery topped off from the bilge pump drain. Just a cheap one from the local auto parts store, but it seems to be doing the job.

    Leave a comment:


  • 2850Bounty
    replied
    I fully agree with John.

    I'm among the NAZIs that hate seeing direct battery connections being made (other than battery cables).

    Here's one of my typical images for dramatic shock 'n awe emphasis. ................


    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffw
    replied
    Thanks Jonh and Harv, makes sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • captharv
    replied
    I wrote this to answer these type of questions

    http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...ad.php?t=35339

    Leave a comment:


  • johnrupp
    replied
    jeffw wrote:
    I don't disagree, but why?
    Jeff,

    There are a few reasons why it is better not to connect right on the battery. Just to name a few.

    1-Batteries are very corrosive, the small wire sizes and their connectors used to feed devices such as bilge pumps, CO detectors etc. corrode very easily. When these wires corrode it increases the resistance in the wire there by lowering the voltage that the device needs to properly operate.

    2-Wires with to much resistance can overheat and cause a fire.

    3-For those that remove their batteries during winter lay-up it makes it more confusing to properly reinstall the batteries.

    Most competent marine electricians will use the battery side post on the battery switch for always powered devices. If you have enough devices or just want to get fancy, some will power a positive buss from battery side post and make all connections there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffw
    replied
    johnrupp wrote:
    I agree with the posts above. However I would wire it to the "always hot" battery side of the battery switch, not to the battery.
    I don't disagree, but why?

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    hey jmess im from wappingers falls also. what marina do you keep at? im at whites

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    I've posted this link in another thread some time ago but it was the single most useful site that I found when planning my own bilge pump setup.

    Highly recommended reading:

    http://www.yachtsurvey.com/bilge_pumps.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • 2850Bounty
    replied
    Long as we're on topic... make certain that any float switch is mounted at an elevation higher than the pump's lowest draw down abilty, so that it will drop the float and turn the pump off.

    Float switches that are too low, may tend to keep a pump running.

    A small amount of remaining water is much better than a dead house bank.

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • JimMc
    replied
    I agree in wiring it at the battery switch and not the battery.

    My original advise was meant to be generic but not literal.

    Leave a comment:


  • 2850Bounty
    replied
    johnrupp wrote:
    I agree with the posts above. However I would wire it to the "always hot" battery side of the battery switch, not to the battery.
    + 1

    Leave a comment:


  • johnrupp
    replied
    I agree with the posts above. However I would wire it to the "always hot" battery side of the battery switch, not to the battery.

    Leave a comment:


  • 2850Bounty
    replied
    I agree with both Jim and Jeff.

    We want the ability to shut down our 12 vdc power when the boat is unattended, and yet still have power to the float switch.

    IOW, no bilge pump switch that has anything to do with the power that supplies the float switch.

    Leave a comment:

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