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Installing FLoat Switch for Bilge-gctid373867

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    Installing FLoat Switch for Bilge-gctid373867

    Hello Everyone

    As much as I love my boat in the marina 6 months out of the year, I hate it also! Im in Ny and as i type It has been raining all day. Sometimes i have to go check out my boat or lose sleep. thinking it will be under water from the rain!!! lol. Dont laugh Im sure you guys feel the same....

    I did have a float switch when i first bought the boat but the problem was it was not installed properly. As of right now the bilge pump for down in the cabin area is on a two way switch, Up is for the livewell and down is for the bilge pump. I hooked the float to the wires for the bilge, but i couldnt turn on the bilge at any time to pump the water out. It would have to fill up until the float rose and the pump turned on.

    i want to install new float tomorrow. Here is how Im going to do it, advise me if there is any other way. Install the float and bilge pump to a new two way switch, pigtail the wires from the float to the bilge pump. When I leave the boat turn the switch down to power the float and when im on the boat turn the switch up to turn on the pump at anytime.

    thanks

    joe

    #2
    Joe

    I am going to suggest a different approach.

    Wire the float to an uninteruptable power source (Battery). You want the float to be able to run the bilge pump any time it is needed.

    Then you add a helm switch that allows you to manually turn the pump on. But the switch does NOT disable power to the float. The float must always be able to power the pump.

    The Bilge Pump ON/OFF or ON/AUTO/OFF both are considered a potential disaster in the making. You want ON/AUTO.

    I would seperate the bilge pump switch from the livewell.
    Jim McNeely
    New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
    Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
    Brighton, Michigan USA
    MMSI # 367393410

    Comment


      #3
      I agree with Jim's advice. I would lose sleep wondering if I flipped the right switch the right way. With the float switch wired to the battery directly, the only way it fails is battery drain.
      Jeff & Tara
      (And Ginger too)
      Lake Havasu City, AZ

      2000 Bayliner 3388
      "GetAway"
      Cummins 4bta 250s

      In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. July 2, 2010

      Comment


        #4
        I agree with both Jim and Jeff.

        We want the ability to shut down our 12 vdc power when the boat is unattended, and yet still have power to the float switch.

        IOW, no bilge pump switch that has anything to do with the power that supplies the float switch.
        Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
        2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
        Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
        Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
        Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

        Comment


          #5
          I agree with the posts above. However I would wire it to the "always hot" battery side of the battery switch, not to the battery.
          John Rupp
          1989 2455 Ciera Sunbridge
          5.8 OMC Cobra

          1989 3288
          Starshine
          Hino 135

          Comment


            #6
            johnrupp wrote:
            I agree with the posts above. However I would wire it to the "always hot" battery side of the battery switch, not to the battery.
            + 1
            Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
            2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
            Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
            Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
            Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

            Comment


              #7
              I agree in wiring it at the battery switch and not the battery.

              My original advise was meant to be generic but not literal.
              Jim McNeely
              New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
              Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
              Brighton, Michigan USA
              MMSI # 367393410

              Comment


                #8
                Long as we're on topic... make certain that any float switch is mounted at an elevation higher than the pump's lowest draw down abilty, so that it will drop the float and turn the pump off.

                Float switches that are too low, may tend to keep a pump running.

                A small amount of remaining water is much better than a dead house bank.

                .
                Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                Comment


                  #9
                  I've posted this link in another thread some time ago but it was the single most useful site that I found when planning my own bilge pump setup.

                  Highly recommended reading:

                  http://www.yachtsurvey.com/bilge_pumps.htm

                  Comment


                    #10
                    hey jmess im from wappingers falls also. what marina do you keep at? im at whites

                    Comment


                      #11
                      johnrupp wrote:
                      I agree with the posts above. However I would wire it to the "always hot" battery side of the battery switch, not to the battery.
                      I don't disagree, but why?
                      Jeff & Tara
                      (And Ginger too)
                      Lake Havasu City, AZ

                      2000 Bayliner 3388
                      "GetAway"
                      Cummins 4bta 250s

                      In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. July 2, 2010

                      Comment


                        #12
                        jeffw wrote:
                        I don't disagree, but why?
                        Jeff,

                        There are a few reasons why it is better not to connect right on the battery. Just to name a few.

                        1-Batteries are very corrosive, the small wire sizes and their connectors used to feed devices such as bilge pumps, CO detectors etc. corrode very easily. When these wires corrode it increases the resistance in the wire there by lowering the voltage that the device needs to properly operate.

                        2-Wires with to much resistance can overheat and cause a fire.

                        3-For those that remove their batteries during winter lay-up it makes it more confusing to properly reinstall the batteries.

                        Most competent marine electricians will use the battery side post on the battery switch for always powered devices. If you have enough devices or just want to get fancy, some will power a positive buss from battery side post and make all connections there.
                        John Rupp
                        1989 2455 Ciera Sunbridge
                        5.8 OMC Cobra

                        1989 3288
                        Starshine
                        Hino 135

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I wrote this to answer these type of questions

                          http://www.baylinerownersclub.org/fo...ad.php?t=35339
                          Captharv 2001 2452
                          "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Thanks Jonh and Harv, makes sense.
                            Jeff & Tara
                            (And Ginger too)
                            Lake Havasu City, AZ

                            2000 Bayliner 3388
                            "GetAway"
                            Cummins 4bta 250s

                            In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. July 2, 2010

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I fully agree with John.

                              I'm among the NAZIs that hate seeing direct battery connections being made (other than battery cables).

                              Here's one of my typical images for dramatic shock 'n awe emphasis. ................


                              Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                              2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                              Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                              Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                              Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                              Comment

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