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    Transom Repair-gctid372608

    My motor and outdrive have been removed. Transom hole looks solid from visual inspection and poking with a screwdriver. Banging transom with various objects makes me believe it's solid. The problem is with the lower two bolts. It appears as though PO torqued them down too far - the metal transom support even shows some bending (thin one below the inner transom plate). Torquing them down, trying to get them to 20-25 ft pounds caused some unsettling sounds. Can the section of the transom around the hole be repaired without replacing the whole transom?

    Greg

    #2
    Greg, unfortunately, the lower most section is where these generally go first.

    The lower most section also takes the greatest torque load as the prop pushes the lower unit in a downward and forward direction against the hull (transom).

    If you were to replace a section only, I'd take out the bad area in a lateral direction Port/Stbd, perhaps several feet in either direction, and build it back from there.

    Once you get into it, you'll realize the factory layers.

    You may be able to separate somewhat at the factory layers, and use this to your advantage.

    One layer could over-lap another, for example.

    Tough to say until you get into it.

    Worst part is the engine and drive removal and the demo.... building it back is the fun part.

    .
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

    Comment


      #3
      The amount of time and the cost of materials involved in replacing the entire transom versus a section makes it worthwhile to do the entire transom. You will also have peace of mind knowing you're completely home safe.

      Comment


        #4
        Astral Blue wrote:
        The amount of time and the cost of materials involved in replacing the entire transom versus a section makes it worthwhile to do the entire transom. You will also have peace of mind knowing you're completely home safe.
        That is true!

        He really won't know the extent of the damage until he gets into it.

        Good news is, he's half way there in terms of the mechanical work.

        In terms of the hard stuff, the old core material removal is yucky and nasty. But once past that, it can be rather fun!

        Cover your skin with baby powder... it closes off the pours, and helps with the itchiness.

        And wear glooves and a good mask.

        .
        Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
        2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
        Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
        Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
        Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

        Comment


          #5
          2850Bounty wrote:
          That is true!

          He really won't know the extent of the damage until he gets into it.

          Good news is, he's half way there in terms of the mechanical work.

          In terms of the hard stuff, the old core material removal is yucky and nasty. But once past that, it can be rather fun!

          Cover your skin with baby powder... it closes off the pours, and helps with the itchiness.

          And wear glooves and a good mask.

          .
          having been a pipe insulator most of my life, I learned to take a cool shower after working with any fiberglass, a hot shower opens the pours.
          Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

          Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
          Twin 350 GM power
          Located in Seward, AK
          Retired marine surveyor

          Comment


            #6
            I was afraid you guys would say dig into the transom. :-( I was holding out hope for a quick repair.

            Greg

            Comment


              #7
              wefivehodges wrote:
              I was afraid you guys would say dig into the transom. :-( I was holding out hope for a quick repair. Greg
              Greg, you were hoping that this would be simple and easy???????

              http://"http://www.pacdv.com/sounds/.../> Click here! :kidding
              Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
              2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
              Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
              Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
              Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

              Comment


                #8
                2850Bounty wrote:
                Greg, you were hoping that this would be simple and easy???????

                http://"http://www.pacdv.com/sounds/.../> Click here! :kidding
                Of course there is an easy fix, it's called Seacast. :drama

                Comment


                  #9
                  Yes. :-) I was hoping for something to go easy.

                  I am planning on doing an inspection by removing the inside fiberglass skin. I intend on using my router, using the hull as a guide. Does this make sense?

                  Once through the inside skin, will it come off easily or is it glued to the wood beneath?

                  Thanks,

                  GReg

                  Comment


                    #10
                    A router with a straigth flute bit (set to depth) can be used to cut the core into square sections.

                    The square-ish smaller sections are much easier to remove.

                    I've also had good luck with a pneumatic chisel and straight cut chisel blade.

                    It's nasty work at first, but will become much easier as you go along.

                    .
                    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                    Comment


                      #11
                      wefivehodges wrote:
                      Yes. :-) I was hoping for something to go easy.

                      I am planning on doing an inspection by removing the inside fiberglass skin. I intend on using my router, using the hull as a guide. Does this make sense?

                      Once through the inside skin, will it come off easily or is it glued to the wood beneath?

                      Thanks,

                      GReg
                      Where it is wet it will come of easy, if dry you will need to peal it off.
                      Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                      Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                      Twin 350 GM power
                      Located in Seward, AK
                      Retired marine surveyor

                      Comment


                        #12
                        So step 1 will be to make it look like this, correct?I am reposting this very helpful photo from the Astral Blue transom repair thread. Thanks Ed.

                        [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/676134=26635-Transom-repair.jpg[/img]I want to make sure I understand this. Can I build the replacement piece as one piece outside the boat and fit it into that space? How does it attach to the boat? Is it tabbed in or is it screwed in at some place? Does it attach to the stringers in some way?Also I know that the transom will be made up of several layers of fir plywood. Do I fiberglass each layer and then glass them together or assemble all three layers and glass around the outside?Thanks, in advance. You guys are a life saver.Greg

                        Comment


                          #13
                          As far as tools go, an air powered oscillating tool fitted with a half moon shaped wood cutting blade was used to remove the skin. It went through it like a hot knife through butter. Corners and tight spots were no problem whatsoever. Harbor freight sells a similar tool, which is electric powered. I have one and have used it to cut glass; and have wondered why the heck I didn't buy it 4 years ago!

                          As far as the plywood panels.. The original plan was to do three layers. I took the advice here that it was excessive; so I had two thicker layers put in. The only instance where screws were used was to hold the panels together until the epoxy cured. The screws were subsequently removed.

                          Make sure you use marine plywood made from fir. While oak and other hard woods are stronger, they are more prone to rotting.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            wefivehodges wrote:


                            1.... I want to make sure I understand this. Can I build the replacement piece as one piece outside the boat and fit it into that space? How does it attach to the boat? Is it tabbed in or is it screwed in at some place? Does it attach to the stringers in some way?

                            2.... Also I know that the transom will be made up of several layers of fir plywood. Do I fiberglass each layer and then glass them together or assemble all three layers and glass around the outside?
                            1... You will do your initial cutting outside of the hull. You'll be doing many dry fits. The dry fitting is critical.

                            It may take three.... it may take seven fits in and out of the boat. It can become laborsome.

                            2... Best to install each piece individually.

                            First section (after many dry fits and corrections) will take advantage of every existing hole in the transom for your temporary fasteners.

                            You will washer down the larger holes for the transom housing, you'll be using each and every swim platfrom bracket hole avialable, etc, even if this means making a few new holes. They can be repaired later on.

                            The key to the first layer, is getting it pulled up tightly to the existing hull's transom skin. NO VOIDS if you can help it.

                            Once the first layer has been pulled in tight, and all checks out, then you disassemble, and apply your resin wet matting, and proceed from there.

                            NOTE: the transom cut out is done last, so run your plywood core right on through this area.

                            NOTE: build yourself a stiffner or backer brace so that the hull skin does not flex at the area where the transom unit bolts on.

                            This is important to be very flat and straight during the curing of the first layer.

                            If this were to become convex/concave, you may have issues when reinstalling the transom housing re; the sealing area.

                            Second layer screws to the first layer (resin wet matting in between) from within the engine bay side.

                            Screws can even be left in place.

                            Greg, your hull is a Polyester built hull. You can use either Epoxy or Polyester resin.

                            Glass matting and roving is the same.

                            IMO, no need for Marine plywood unless you want to use it.

                            The factory used Fir CDX, and it held up for XX years... and this was done by those good balls at the factory with a Chopper Gun.

                            You will be doing a much better job than what those goof balls did during the original construction.

                            The plywood core forms a box beam..... and does not entirely rely on diaphragm strength from the plywood.

                            Yes... Marine grade is a much better quality than CDX.

                            The box beam affect will be where it receives it's structural integrity.

                            .
                            Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                            2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                            Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                            Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                            Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                            Comment


                              #15
                              If you use epoxy on the outside layer you will not be able to use gelcoat, I recommend using an iso type resin or vinyl ester, vinyl ester is waterproof and you can gelcoat over either one, do not use general purpose resin! The gelcoat should be of the iso type, more chemical resistant (gasoline).

                              They make a patch putty that is nothing more than thickened resin, this can be used to smooth out the fiberglass prior to installing the wood after fitting.

                              I agree that workind from the outside would be much easier, a little more finish work though, but you can stand up to work.
                              Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                              Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                              Twin 350 GM power
                              Located in Seward, AK
                              Retired marine surveyor

                              Comment

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