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    Soft cabin floor-gctid368047

    So upon my poking around the boat, noticed the floor at the base of my steps is "soft". Is it from moisture not being pumped by the bildge or water from wet feet? Or combination of both? Looking to get to the root of it before replacing the floor... should i check the pumps to see if they are doin their job or assume thats its from water above prior to the top being installed... ??

    #2
    Soft spots are from rot. When moisture enters wood and stays there, it turns into an environment conducive to fungal growth. You need to replace the rotted wood and check all the wood around it as well. If the fungus is still present and moisture continues to reside there, the wood will prone to rotting.

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      #3
      YUp, i understand that part sir. What im curious is how it got there... and then, can i just replace one spot in the floor? Or can i just run a dehumidifier?

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        #4
        apexaro1 wrote:
        YUp, i understand that part sir. What im curious is how it got there... and then, can i just replace one spot in the floor? Or can i just run a dehumidifier?
        Fungus spores reside in the environment. If there is a place where moisture stays, conditions become ripe for a fungus festival. After replacing the wood, make sure there is adequate ventilation. If you replace the rotted wood and fungus spores still have an environment to grow and multiply, you will find yourself back at step one. After replacing the wood, you need to eliminate the conditions that are conducive to fungal growth.

        I personally despise the idea of placing carpet over wood because it restricts the airflow and creates conditions ripe for fungal growth. In addition to ensuring proper airflow, ensure water is not collecting under there.

        A dehumidifier is a great thing to have. I personally use a peltier dehumidifier and keep it on whenever I'm not at the boat. It hardly uses power and extracts a considerable amount of moisture from my cabin. It is a worthwhile investment.

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          #5
          Look for cracks in the fiberglass or any screw holes from mounted accessories or railings where water could get it. Water can also travel far from where it actually enters the boat. It could turn into a major project once you get into it. I had a Larson one time where the deck was soft in one small area but when I started poking around I found that the whole deck needed to be replaced. It's tough to say but I don't think a dehumidifier would do much good.

          Matt

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            #6
            Ding Dang wrote:
            It's tough to say but I don't think a dehumidifier would do much good.

            Matt
            A dehumidifier is useless after the fact. But in a situation where you have wood that is already free of rot, the dehumidifier is an invaluable tool for preventing fungal growth. Fungus that rots wood cannot grow in the absence of moisture.

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              #7
              Astral Blue wrote:
              A dehumidifier is useless after the fact. But in a situation where you have wood that is already free of rot, the dehumidifier is an invaluable tool for preventing fungal growth. Fungus that rots wood cannot grow in the absence of moisture.
              A better overall solution im my opinion is to eliminate the possibility of rot in the same area again from the get go. . One of the reasons boat builders use wood in some areas is to reduce costs and ease of manufacture. If I were in the same situation I would make any repairs using something other than wood or by using as little wood as possible. Starboard and glass would be my choice of repair materials. It could get a little expensive though. Although a dehumidifer has it's uses on a boat, I personaly don't see it as the best way to prevent or cure rot. Keep it dry, proper maintainance, building materials, and ventilation are my personal choices.

              Matt

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                #8
                When you say soft, have you inspected the wood? Or is it just flexing? On my boat of I stand at the very edge of where the floor and the step meets there is a bit of flex there. Looking at it, there is no support there as my water tank sits about 12" from there.
                Phil, Vicky, Ashleigh & Sydney
                1998 3055 Ciera
                (yes, a 1998)
                Previous boat: 1993 3055
                Dream boat: 70' Azimut or Astondoa 72
                Sea Doo XP
                Sea Doo GTI SE
                Life is short. Boats are cool.
                The family that plays together stays together.
                Vice Commodore: Bellevue Yacht Club

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                  #9
                  apexaro1 wrote:
                  So upon my poking around the boat, noticed the floor at the base of my steps is "soft". Is it from moisture not being pumped by the bildge or water from wet feet? Or combination of both? Looking to get to the root of it before replacing the floor... should i check the pumps to see if they are doin their job or assume thats its from water above prior to the top being installed... ??
                  Hello, I thought I would share this with you; I think I can safely state that all Victoria's and even most boats that are 33 years old will experience deterioration of the wood floors, the transom, and the engine compartment stringers etc. from rot. So yes, it's from moisture trapped under the floor as well as the constant pounding that spot gets every time someone steps into the cabin. Pull the lid off the shower bilge next to the helm and tap the stringers with a hammer. I'd bet it's rotten there as well.

                  The proper repair is to replace the entire floor and while the floor is out and you are replacing the floor joists, re-design/improve the bilge drainage so less water sits trapped. That being said, you can make partial floor repairs. The key is to remove all the rotten wood because rot is a cancer and will spread to the new wood. The problem is when you start digging in you will probably find the rot extends a lot further than you thought.

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                    #10
                    Fish-a-Palooza wrote:
                    Hello, I thought I would share this with you; I think I can safely state that all Victoria's and even most boats that are 33 years old will experience deterioration of the wood floors, the transom, and the engine compartment stringers etc. from rot. So yes, it's from moisture trapped under the floor as well as the constant pounding that spot gets every time someone steps into the cabin. Pull the lid off the shower bilge next to the helm and tap the stringers with a hammer. I'd bet it's rotten there as well.

                    The proper repair is to replace the entire floor and while the floor is out and you are replacing the floor joists, re-design/improve the bilge drainage so less water sits trapped. That being said, you can make partial floor repairs. The key is to remove all the rotten wood because rot is a cancer and will spread to the new wood. The problem is when you start digging in you will probably find the rot extends a lot further than you thought.
                    Maybe ill just use this one as it is and save for something different down the road... would like to be in the 32ft range for my idea boat.. not too far from where im at now... thanks for all the great ideas and advice... greatest tool in my box is the BOC!!!

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