Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Where to mount on demand water heater... installation help please.-gctid342457

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Where to mount on demand water heater... installation help please.-gctid342457

    Hello,I am almost ready to install a similar water heater as shown some where on my 2750.I am thinking on the side across from the flybridge helm up top but it would be close to the propane tanks? I also want to pipe the Atwood Everest furnace exhaust into the same pipe if possible.If I mount the W heater up top I would have to pump water up to the bridge and would this be a problem.I could use some ideas on how and where to mount these appliances on a cruiser.The cabin is empty of beds and cabinets At this point,I am still restoring so I can build around them.I have a little experience with these I put one on the side of my camper last year and plumbed it in.thanks

    Attached files [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/645045=23524-$(KGrHqJ,!lQE6B-v(Vf5BOpCdJWOsQ~~60_12.jpg[/img]

    #2
    I would not advise to use both exhaust pipes into one, if both on there would be back pressure issues, if only one on there would be exhaust pressure into the silent one.

    Depending on your water pump pressure and volume you can push up hill.

    You should get more feedback on this one.
    Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

    Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
    Twin 350 GM power
    Located in Seward, AK
    Retired marine surveyor

    Comment


      #3
      Please let us know how the product works. I have been toying around with the idead of one myself.

      Thanks,

      Phil
      Phil, Vicky, Ashleigh & Sydney
      1998 3055 Ciera
      (yes, a 1998)
      Previous boat: 1993 3055
      Dream boat: 70' Azimut or Astondoa 72
      Sea Doo XP
      Sea Doo GTI SE
      Life is short. Boats are cool.
      The family that plays together stays together.
      Vice Commodore: Bellevue Yacht Club

      Comment


        #4
        Will do Phil.I dont think its going to be easy.I hope a couple BOC members can lead me in the right direction.I would hate to mount and plumb it all in and find out I cant insure the boat or something and have to pull it all out LOL...

        I just pulled this off the net and its informative looks expensive

        http://www.boatus.com/boattech/propane.htm

        http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey/18.htm

        Selinoids,sniffers,braided lines oh my. throw in another thousand

        Comment


          #5
          I can give you some advice based on my research and install. First, my insurance company is ok with the install being a 'marine certified' unit. I would be comfortable installing a 'residential' unit if it were vented to the outside though (combustion intake and exhaust). What I mean by this is that the unit stays outside (I would be surprised if that unit is designed for exterior use although they do exist) or is built into your boat inside a cabinet where the cabinet is sealed off from cabin air. You'll need the solenoids, propane control panel, sensors and all that of course but that is the easy part. Also, you'll need special bulkhead fittings for both gas and electrical (propane shop made up the fittings, electrical fittings available at our local marine shop). The only thing I think I did wrong is the use of gas line. I used rubber hose but I believe copper should be used or re-enforced rubber hose (very expensive). You'll also need to consider the location of your propane tank (outside is best or in a cabinet in boat double vented to exterior).Gary.

          [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/645188=23548-IMG_1293.jpg[/img]

          [img]/media/kunena/attachments/vb/645188=23549-IMG_1332.jpg[/img]

          Comment


            #6
            itsabowtime2 wrote:
            Please let us know how the product works. I have been toying around with the idead of one myself.

            Thanks,

            Phil
            [SIZE]4 wrote:
            The 6L I use on my camper is just large enough for a shower I dont open the cold water tap on at all just the hot and regulate the temp by the amount of water flowing through the unit.I have used it many times without any issues very reliable.No external power needed just two DD batterys for the electronic ignition. It can make really hot water but at a low flow.I am glad I ordered a larger unit for the boat the 10L but the size of the unit could be difficult to mount.[/SIZE]

            Comment


              #7
              We have the same boat. Like yours, mine was gutted and restored. The PO started the process and I finished it. I did extensive research on water heating options. Given spave constraints, the heater you mentioned would not be practical for this boat, in my opinion.

              Here is what I did:

              I installed an Ariston 4 gallon water heater in my engine compartment, on the starboard side. This serves the galley sink only. When under way, the unit is powered by the house battery bank via inverter.

              For the shower, I'm using a Coleman tankless camping water heater. It sits on the counter in the head. It uses one pound cylinders and each cylinder gives about 40 gallons of hot water. Make sure the head porthole and starboard side window are open while showering.

              Hope this helps.

              Comment


                #8
                Astral Blue wrote:
                We have the same boat. Like yours, mine was gutted and restored. The PO started the process and I finished it. I did extensive research on water heating options. Given spave constraints, the heater you mentioned would not be practical for this boat, in my opinion.

                Here is what I did:

                I installed an Ariston 4 gallon water heater in my engine compartment, on the starboard side. This serves the galley sink only. When under way, the unit is powered by the house battery bank via inverter.

                For the shower, I'm using a Coleman tankless camping water heater. It sits on the counter in the head. It uses one pound cylinders and each cylinder gives about 40 gallons of hot water. Make sure the head porthole and starboard side window are open while showering.

                Hope this helps.
                Thanks for the info I looked at your heaters on line and I like them,seems more practical, I might have to go that way.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I'm a HVAC service tech and on demand water heaters fall into our bailywick. I don't know if there is a specifc marine approved on demand tank, but I feel comfortable making the following general statements. 1. as far as combining vents, NO. Most units are direct vent meaning there's an inner and outer tube one is the intake and one is the exhaust. 2. If the unit isn't rated for marine use there could be corrosion issues, I've seen a few units get all corroded up and the burners all plugged up from being with in a couple blocks of Puget Sound and pulling in salt air.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    For those that read this that might want something more portable, I got this unit:

                    http://www.campingworld.com/shopping...r-heater/37786

                    When camping on the boat on clean water such as here on Havasu, I hook this up to my raw-water washdown hose and a BBQ size propane tank, and I have hot shower water on the swim step for as long as the propane lasts.
                    Jeff & Tara
                    (And Ginger too)
                    Lake Havasu City, AZ

                    2000 Bayliner 3388
                    "GetAway"
                    Cummins 4bta 250s

                    In memory of Shadow, the best boat dog ever. Rest in peace, girl. July 2, 2010

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X