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Which is the recommended inflation pressure PSI-gctid360947

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    Which is the recommended inflation pressure PSI-gctid360947

    Trailer galvanized, swing tongue, tandem axle, brakes

    tire st 185-80-13

    boat bayliner 215 2012 v8 5.0

    #2
    I fill to the PSI printed on the tire and have not had any problems.

    Comment


      #3
      Ditto John, or pull the trailer into a reputable tire shop and ask them what pressure to use.
      Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
      2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
      Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
      Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
      Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

      Comment


        #4
        Despite what hurricane said, the pressure marked on the side of the tire is the MAXIMUM pressure to be used in that tire under the tires listed MAXIMUM load. Putting that much pressure in a tire running significantly less, or even slightly less than the max rated load will cause the tire to run on the centre of the tire's tread, resulting in excessive wear, heat and reduced traction. Conversely running the tires significantly under the rated max pressure while loading them close or at the max load will cause the tires to run on the outer edges of the tread with the centre portion pushing up into the tire, again resulting in excessive wear, heating to likely failure and poor handling.

        All this said, you will need to know the weight of boat and contents as it sits on the trailer, plus or minus a couple hundred pounds, plus the weight of the trailer and as bounty said, go to a reputable tire shop to have someone knowledgeable there calculate the proper pressure.

        James

        Comment


          #5
          James has a point.

          Your boat is 2838 Net Wt, plus engine fluids, gas and whatever, plus trailer. 4000#s or so. Your max load at max pressure is [email protected] psi per tire. That's 6000 lbs of capacity at max pressure. Definitely seek a pros advice. Over inflation could lead to premature wear and tear. JMO

          Comment


            #6
            Iv always went with the PSI on the tire. Im not an engineer but im sure they given a +- factor when giving that rating. On a short distance trip I wouldnt worry but if you do allot of towing and your paranoid call a trailer joint.

            In Illinois we have to get safety inspected over I think it's over 3501lbs (so a double axle better have one) if you have the same regulations ask the folks at the safety lanes when getting your inspection.

            Comment


              #7
              You wont pull your trailer enough miles to worry about treadwear. they will wear out from age long before you wear them out from mileage.

              from lots of experience, with that sized boat, just go with the stated pressure on the tire. This is MUCH better and will not generate heat like an underinflated tire will. Heat is generated by the sidwall flex from an overloaded or under inflated tire. Heat is the killer.

              If you want to try something. Try running one tire at 50 psi, and one at 25 pis, and drive on the freeway for 30 miles or so in the summer, and then touch each tire. You WILL feel the heat difference.

              Air them up, and go. Been there done that. Small boats, big boats, I have done it all.

              Keep them at the rated pressure and you will rarely, if ever have a tire problem, except for the age thing, that changes everything.

              Comment


                #8
                Tire pressure will depend on the tire rating-C,D,or E and the load weight.
                Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                Twin 350 GM power
                Located in Seward, AK
                Retired marine surveyor

                Comment


                  #9
                  I'll toss this into the mix here if I may.

                  Typically, not always, but typically I will see people with smaller boats, like yours, load them up with most of their gear, rather than using the tow rig to haul the gear. This can mean an extra 1k lb or so in the hull and on the trailer.

                  This may place the load at/near, or even over, what the trailer, springs, axles, bearings, wheels/tires were designed for.... not to mention the added stress on the hull.

                  Then look at what 13" wheels/tires may mean in terms of wheel bearing size.

                  13" typically dictates four or five lug hubs.... perhaps four. Four or five lug hubs typically dictate a smaller bearing assembly...... and believe me, these are just on the border line of being sized adequately for even a smaller boat.

                  Good thing is.... you have a tandem axle trailer!

                  I guess my point is, look at wheel bearings as importantly as you look at tire pressure.
                  Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
                  2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
                  Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
                  Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
                  Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Excellent point about the bearings, and for goodness sake keep them full of grease with Bearing Buddies. A small amount of water (especially salt) getting to your bearings and they will weld themselves together. Yup, been there and done that too!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I appreciate your opinions, thanks

                      Comment


                        #12
                        cbraint wrote:
                        I appreciate your opinions, thanks
                        Thanks for the thanks, but my comments are not opinions they are fact.

                        To any of the responders that said 'just air'em up and go', should be shot firstly. Check the load and pressure ratings on your car or truck tires, then check the pressure specs from the manufacturer, I will guarantee none of the recommended pressures are anywhere near the max pressure rating on the tires. Same with the truck tires, it will have a pressure for no or light load, and a higher pressure for max vehicle load which will be less than the max combined tire load rating.

                        And as dpoelstra suggested, run one tire at max rated pressure and one obviously low (definitely not recommended because it will seriously overload the higher pressurized tire) and see which one has the hot sidewall. Obviously the low pressure one will have hot sidewalls from excessive flexing, but the over pressure tire will be just as hot right down the centre of the tread because only a small portion of the tread will be taking the load. On a tire with a 5 inch tread, being over pressured could mean as little as 2 inches of that tire is loaded.

                        It doesn't matter the load rating of the tire; c,d or e, that only has to do with the LOAD rating of the tire. It still has to be inflated to the correct pressure, not the max pressure rating on the sidewall.

                        Think of it like this, your 1/2 ton truck is rated with a GVW of 7000lbs, does that mean that you load it to 7000 lbs every time you go out for a drive?

                        James

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