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1986 2450 Sunbridge ignition circuit on 11 volts; but 13 at fuse panel-gctid359586

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    1986 2450 Sunbridge ignition circuit on 11 volts; but 13 at fuse panel-gctid359586

    1986 2450 Sunbridge ignition circuit on 11 volts; but 13 at fuse panel

    1986 2450 Ciera Sunbridge Bayliner - I'm the original owner

    Volvo-Penta AQ225A V8 with 275 outdrive and electric tilt (not electic trim)

    I do not have shore power installed. My system is 12 volt only.

    Problem: ignition circuit 11 volts at voltmeter, but 13 volts at main fuse panel behind control panel for boat wiring.

    New alternator with regulator didn't solve the problem.

    New voltmeter installed by Bayliner/Volvo dealer didn't solve the problem. It was also hard-wired (eliminated the "push on" quick connector, which didn't tightly fit the narrower bolts on the new meter)

    New ignition switch installed, didn't resolve the problem.

    Main engine/ignition fuse tests okay with multimeter (continuity) and under load (voltmeter.)

    With engine running at 1,500 RPM, voltage at batteries is 12.8 to 13 volts on digital voltmeter.

    I've cleaned every ignition circuit connection I can find, including the ground bolted to the engine.

    When I use a jumper from the fuse panel to the voltmeter, it reads 13 volts. Otherwise it reads 11 volts. It reads the same with a digital multimeter in the 0-20 volt range.

    An experienced mechanic told me that Bayliners have an engine wiring harness with a connection at the engine and a second connection in the hollow void space near the throttle and gear shift levers, on the starboard side of the cockpit. I have access to this space at three locations:

    1. Removing the throttle/gear assembly (4 screws)

    2. Where the wires from the control panel enter

    3. An access hole under the vinyl trim panel on the starboard side, just behind the helmsman's seat area.

    The wiring bundle appears to the fastened with clamps to the floor in the hollow void, slightly beyond my reach. I cannot find this "other connecter" visibly or by gently pulling on the wire bundle. Does anyone have an experience in locating this connector, or whether it may even exist?

    Is anyone familiar with this low voltage electrical problem; Has anyone fixed it? If so, how?

    I do have the 1986 Volvo Penta by Clymer with the engine wiring schematic.

    Thanks for your help

    Gary

    "Prelude"

    1986 2450 Sunbridge with Volvo AQ225A and 275 Outdrive

    Long Beach Island, NJ and Florida snowbird

    #2
    Gary Koerner wrote:


    An experienced mechanic told me that Bayliners have an engine wiring harness with a connection at the engine and a second connection in the hollow void space near the throttle and gear shift levers, on the starboard side of the cockpit. I have access to this space at three locations:

    1. Removing the throttle/gear assembly (4 screws)

    2. Where the wires from the control panel enter

    3. An access hole under the vinyl trim panel on the starboard side, just behind the helmsman's seat area.

    The wiring bundle appears to the fastened with clamps to the floor in the hollow void, slightly beyond my reach. I cannot find this "other connecter" visibly or by gently pulling on the wire bundle. Does anyone have an experience in locating this connector, or whether it may even exist?

    1986 2450 Sunbridge with Volvo AQ225A and 275 Outdrive
    Gary, the only wiring that you'll find within the throttle/shift unit, should be the neutral safety switch.

    This switch interrupts the circuit for the starter motor solenoid until the shift unit is in neutral.

    It does nothing else.

    The mechanic is probably talking about Bayliner's hull harness. Since each engine harness is unique to the engine, Bayliner's harness connector changes with each engine type.

    Volvo's engine harness uses a white, rectangular multi pin connector.

    This connector uses flat male/female wire terminals.

    The connector will be at the inside of the transom, and will be covered with a 2 pc black flexible boot... one folded over the top of the other.

    Peel this boot back and gain access to this connector.

    Unplug the connector, examine the terminals, spray a corrosion blocker on them, then re-insert.

    Pull back apart and repeat this several times.

    This should regain continuity.... if there was an issue here in the first place, and that is rather likely on a boat of this age!

    All of your engine data circuits run in this harness and forward to the helm panel.

    The ignition and start circuits run rearward to the engine harness.

    In this harness, will also be your helm power and negative circuits. These are important ones!

    As for a second harness connector... I'm not sure that a 24 footer used one. Check to make sure.

    If so, do the same at this connector.

    Now, this may not clean up the voltage reading differential that you are seeing, but it's ceratainly a place to start.

    .
    Rick E. Gresham, Oregon
    2850 Bounty Sedan Flybridge model
    Twin 280 HP 5.7's w/ Closed Cooling
    Volvo Penta DuoProp Drives
    Kohler 4 CZ Gen Set

    Comment


      #3
      The engine requires about 4 amps average while running. The 2 volt drop across whatever is causing it will cause about 8 watts of heat to be there. If the molex connector is corroded, the plastic around the corrosion will be tan, brown or black, and the heat should be obvious. Run the engine at high idle for 10 minutes and try the braile method of troubleshooting.

      The wiring from the key switch to the coil should be purple.

      Now, as far as the alternator. Most of the older boat engines used Motorola alternators. They had 2 small wires attched and a large orange for the output.

      There was a purple, which tells the altenator that the engine is running, and turns on the voltage regulator. The other small wire is a voltage sense wire which tells the alternator how much voltage yto put out. The motorola has the volt reg on the rear. If you remove the regulator, there is a small wire going from it to the alternators rotor winding (armature). Disconnect this wire. Use a clip lead and clip the rotor terminal to the + battery. Connect the digital VM across the orange wire to ground. start the engine. Even at 1000 RPM the alternator should put out >14 volts. shut down afetr reading the meter. Reconnect the regulator. start again. if it does not put out > than 14 at 1000, the regulator is bad.

      Then troubleshoot te small wires and make sure they have voltage on them.

      IMHO: The Motorolas were better alternators than the Korean Mando now being used.
      Captharv 2001 2452
      "When the draft of your boat exceeds the depth of water, you are aground"

      Comment


        #4
        my 1986 2750 read the same, has for years. but runs fine.

        Comment

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