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What is the best way to reseal bowrail stanchions on our 2003 2359 Trophy Pro?-gctid359392

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    What is the best way to reseal bowrail stanchions on our 2003 2359 Trophy Pro?-gctid359392

    I'm getting a small amounts water running down the inside of the cuddy. Number one suspect is the stanchions for the bow rails because it seems to originate around the inside fasteners.

    Number 2 suspect is now the through rub rail screws that hold the inside padded rails in place. Thanks to those answering my other post for the answer on how to remove.

    I have access to most of the hardware for the stanchions except maybe those in the anchor locker.

    What is the recommended materials and method to be sure this never leaks again. I should have enough room to raise the stanchions just enough to seal under them - even if I can't access the very front stanchions.

    My guess is they were never sealed or were sealed incorrectly. I could suspect the way they jammed the winch wiring in behind the stbd rail but that would not make the port side leak too.

    A minor tightening may have slowed the process down but after months of rain - it's time to shampoo again. I'd much sooner be proactive than reactive because it's not going to stop raining here.

    I've considered getting a full cover but it seems overkill and the wrong approach, we already have a full enclosed HT and a rear sloping canvas.

    On the bright side - all leaks are from above and not below- typical of most boats I've owned and this was the first from Brunswick Corp. We love our Trophy
    2003 Trophy Pro 2359; Rebuilt 5.7L Vortec longblock (crate) using rest of the previous owners freeze destroyed 5.0L. Now fully FWC Alpha 1 Gen 2 drive.

    #2
    Be sure not to seal the drain groove on the bottom of the rail fitting, if it fills with water and freezes, it will burst the lower rail.

    Only seal the screw holes, 3m 4200 or 5200, 4200 remains a little flexable, 5200 dries almost hard.
    Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

    Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
    Twin 350 GM power
    Located in Seward, AK
    Retired marine surveyor

    Comment


      #3
      theres the easy way and hard way. easy way is to remove all the screwes pull the stanchions, clean, re seal with 4200 and reinstall. oh wait... my fault... there is no easy way.... as for the rub rail there is in fact an easy way and hard way.... easy is to follow the same process as the stanchions which means removing all your rub rail, and easy way is using 4200 UV protected to seal the outside of the rub rail where it meets the hull, you also need to pull all the rubber out and seal each screw on the inside of the rub part of the rub rail

      Comment


        #4
        Remove the rail and seal the screw holes, this is the right way and much more permanent, caulking around the rail will not work if you have non welded base fittings.
        Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

        Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
        Twin 350 GM power
        Located in Seward, AK
        Retired marine surveyor

        Comment


          #5
          If there is any coring in the deck where the screws go through you must make sure it is clear and dry before resealing or it will rot.

          Comment


            #6
            Do you know for sure it is secured with screws ?

            Mine is secured with bolts and nylock nuts inside.
            Jim McNeely
            New Hope a 2004 Bayliner 305 Sunbridge Express Cruiser
            Twin 5.7s with Bravo2 drives
            Brighton, Michigan USA
            MMSI # 367393410

            Comment


              #7
              JimMc wrote:
              Do you know for sure it is secured with screws ?

              Mine is secured with bolts and nylock nuts inside.
              I've searched inside and never found anything, just finished upholsery with no mystery pockets for hidden screws. It either won't quit raining outside when I have time or is too cold so far to remove the inner part of rub and see. It's more pliable if warmer, so am I.

              The rails are welded at the bottom foot but not at the tops where they T. One has a split very high up but I thought that was a whack from PO. Once again not a good thing to open up until the weather improves. Would 5200 be the best choice if I do it right the first time or is this a job that needs repeating which might favour the 4200 ?
              2003 Trophy Pro 2359; Rebuilt 5.7L Vortec longblock (crate) using rest of the previous owners freeze destroyed 5.0L. Now fully FWC Alpha 1 Gen 2 drive.

              Comment


                #8
                I would drill a small hole near the bottom for drainage, I had one rail base split, and the only place water could enter was the slip joint near the bow pulpit.

                One way to see if you have screws or bolts is to try and back one screw out.

                If the base of the rail area is balsa cored it will never dry out, there are products you can squirt in to help firm up the hole, if solid just use 4200 and new ss screws where necessary.
                Pat says: DO-IT-RIGHT THE FIRST TIME!

                Bayliner 3870 "ALASKA33)
                Twin 350 GM power
                Located in Seward, AK
                Retired marine surveyor

                Comment


                  #9
                  http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3...esive_Sealant/

                  3M does not recommend 4200 for sealing hardware to decks (SS to fibreglass). They recommend 5200, 4000UV, 101 and silicone. I would use 5200, or an equivalent other brand.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I was having a slight problem with leakage from the rub rail screws holding the top to the bottom hull. I removed the rub rail, pulled the screws one at a time and replaced with a slightly larger screw. Before putting each screw in I dabbed a bit of 5200 in the hole. Once I completely went around the boat I applied clear corning 732 silicone and installed the rub rail back into the slot while the silicone was still plyable. It has not leaked or creaked for 3 years now.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      whiskywizard wrote:
                      http://"http://solutions.3m.com/wps/...esive_Sealant/

                      3M does not recommend 4200 for sealing hardware to decks (SS to fibreglass). They recommend 5200, 4000UV, 101 and silicone. I would use 5200, or an equivalent other brand.
                      Thanks Mike. What would you use to clean up the stuff that squeezes out when I tighten the stanchion bases back down. They are thru bolted with nylocs and washeers inside.
                      2003 Trophy Pro 2359; Rebuilt 5.7L Vortec longblock (crate) using rest of the previous owners freeze destroyed 5.0L. Now fully FWC Alpha 1 Gen 2 drive.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        nottingham88 wrote:
                        Thanks Mike. What would you use to clean up the stuff that squeezes out when I tighten the stanchion bases back down. They are thru bolted with nylocs and washeers inside.
                        3M sells a solvent specifically for that. See instructions here. http://"http://multimedia.3m.com/mws...6EVs6E666666--? I use acetone for cleaning. Wipe quickly with it and don't let it pool on gelcoat for any extended period.

                        After you remove the stanchions and clean the surfaces, apply the adhesive sealant and put the stanchion back in place. Put some 5200 on each screw and push the screws down into place. Hold the screw heads to prevent them turning, and install backing plates or fender washers, lock washers, and nuts, or nylock nuts. Try to turn on the nuts without letting the cap screws turns. Tighten everything just until it's all in place and positioned, but do not snug it up. Let the 5200 set up and then snug down. This way, you don't squeeze all the 5200 out of the assembly, starving the joints. Very little cleanup will be needed.

                        Try to do it his way, and there isn't as much cleanup.

                        Edit, re acetone.... Some people feel acetone will soften gelcoat. This is definitely true for freshly laid gelcoat, but I believe that's only true on uncured gelcoat. I have used acetone as my "go to" cleaner for every boat I've owned and not had any problems on gel that is well set up.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Thanks Mike, that sounds easy enough to follow properly and it makes much sense to allow it to set up before snugging down. I'll read the manufacturers instructions you linked to and have appropriate cleaner and 5200 on hand before I start.

                          I've used acetone before and found if you're quick enough all you lose is the wax from the area. It's also great for getting the wax off rubstrips, the stuff the PO let build up that seemed impossible to remove. Subsequently I found that Collinites's fibreglass boat cleaner # 920 works well for that too and is less agressive. I seriously doubt that would clean 5200 though.

                          Of course this job will require some dry weather. We've been hit by another storm, both here and where our RV is parked on upper Vancouver Island. We were lucky this time but many weren't.

                          I appreciate all the responses and help provided on this forum - Thank You to all..

                          Rick.
                          2003 Trophy Pro 2359; Rebuilt 5.7L Vortec longblock (crate) using rest of the previous owners freeze destroyed 5.0L. Now fully FWC Alpha 1 Gen 2 drive.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I had the same minor leak issues on my 2452. I dribbled Captn Tolly's creaping crack cure around every screw, fitting and piece of glass I could find and got an instant fix with hardly any work involved. This has lasted for 3 years now!

                            The only issue is if you let surplus 'tolly' harden on the your gel-coat. It is a bu99er to get off once it has cured. When you apply it you have to give it a minute to work its way in (capillary action) and then wipe off all surplus.

                            It is amazing stuff.

                            http://www.captaintolley.com/
                            Terry (Retired Diving Instructor and Part Time IT Consultant)
                            1998 Bayliner 2452. 5.7l V8 - Edelbrock 1409 4bbl - Alpha1Gen2 - Solent UK.
                            MMSI 235061726

                            Comment


                              #15
                              TerryW wrote:
                              I had the same minor leak issues on my 2452. I dribbled Captn Tolly's creaping crack cure around every screw, fitting and piece of glass I could find and got an instant fix with hardly any work involved. This has lasted for 3 years now!

                              The only issue is if you let surplus 'tolly' harden on the your gel-coat. It is a bu99er to get off once it has cured. When you apply it you have to give it a minute to work its way in (capillary action) and then wipe off all surplus.

                              It is amazing stuff.

                              http://www.captaintolley.com/
                              I've used Captain Tolley's with success too. I think it's the first thing to try on a leaky windshield. (Sorry Terry - I meant windscreen)

                              One thing to think about ... What if the Captain Tolley's seals part of the leak path, and stops the water running in at the stanchion so that it no longer makes its way into the boat's cabin, but it's leaking still, but only into the deck core? When the threat is water seeping into the core, I think you should do the fix as well as you can, as soon as you can.

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